tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-3379593058926087592019-05-21T10:53:31.259+01:00Melissa Moore Television JournalMelissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.comBlogger338125tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-84432544663161526452019-05-08T16:39:00.000+01:002019-05-10T07:33:29.257+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Project Evaluation<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Production</b></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">My aim for this major project unit was to further develop the aspects of production which I had written about in the pre-production package. These included crew, props, costume, budget, locations, schedules and marketing. I undertook more research that helped me further develop aspects of production such as how to handle the budget during this stage, editing and marketing techniques. Throughout my research, I learnt the importance of a script read through and how to evaluate the casts' performances. Another benefit of the read through was so I could give out all the necessary forms required for filming, such as artist contracts and bank information. After creating an estimated budget in the pre-production unit, I had to continue managing this throughout production. I carried out some research into way in which I could handle this and learnt about money expenditure logs. These ended up being really helpful in recording outgoings and keeping track of the travel fares. I also used this time period to look further into aspects of production that didn't quite work in the pre-production unit. For example, I look at alternative locations to carry out the dog hit, and from Alex's requirements of a mixed residential and rural area, I found an adequate location in Margate. In addition to this, as a group we worked out how to conduct and film the dog hit. We did this by practicing the different methods we had in mind, whether to run over a big bag and carpet or simply move in a certain way to imply the fact we had just hit something.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I gained additional crew on board with our project - an on-set dresser and a photographer. Throughout the shooting period, I realised how beneficial it was to have the extra members of crew. They allowed the shooting period to become smoother by taking roles away from Katie, Alex and myself so we could concentrate on our own. I prepped a lot for each shoot day, checking we had all props and the cast knew about their costumes. I also filled out the required risk assessments to a good standard so I knew about the control methods to keeping my cast and crew safe on set.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I believe I worked well as a creative producer on the shoot days. I made sure we had all the shots we needed for each day by crossing them off the refined shot list. Due to this I believe I took my research into the shoot days by becoming "ringleader, seeing to it that all the elements come together as planned" (Martin, 2013). In addition to this,</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;I also found that I could act as a 'second director'. While not getting in the way, I was there simply for support for Alex if he needed it. I also constantly made sure the original vision for the film was realised while shooting. This was possible by having the shot list with the initial plans on it. I listened, looked and reacted, as advised by Blaine Deutsch, on the shoot days to ensure everyone was happy and help out if there were any problems. I had to put this into practice at one point in production on the second shoot day. We were taking scenes 7 &amp; 9 slowly because we had time before shooting the night scene, however, I could notice that the cast members were getting cold and bored from standing around while decisions were being made regarding filming and blocking, so I reacted by pushing the filming along slightly so we could get going. Even if we did a few more takes of the same shot, at least the cast weren't stood around getting cold.</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;I was available on every shoot day to ensure all elements came together as planned. I felt this was important advice to take forward from my research into creative producing. While Alex and Katie were concentrating on blocking and filming, I was making sure everything was captured and we were on time shooting specific scenes each day, which ultimately meant that all elements came together by the final shooting day.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I was prepared with the make-up aspect to the film as this is such an important part to our visuals, particularly the blood. I conducted a trial run with the make-up artist I had got on board in the pre-production unit. The results we gained from the trail run were beneficial for the shoot days as I was able to liaise with Alex and explain what we created. This made the day simpler for all of us as we weren't spending loads of time deciding what make-up to do. Beth was able to get straight on with the make-up and blood when she was required to do so.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I&nbsp;organised and conducted the re-shoot and&nbsp;voice over day in the exact same way that I&nbsp;approached the main shooting period to&nbsp;maintain professionalism throughout the whole project. I also took the creativity through to the re-shoot, by again taking control and making sure everything was captured and we were on schedule. This allowed all the elements to come together as planned prior to the test shoot, i.e. shot lists, blocking.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Post-production</b></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the post-production&nbsp;stage I was the rough cut editor. Throughout my research I&nbsp;found that this means I had to resemble the edit to look like the&nbsp;final product. I followed the script and storyboard while assembling the initial footage and audio&nbsp;together. As I was making sure the&nbsp;original vision was being realised in the shoot days, I had to&nbsp;continue with this and make sure the&nbsp;edit was also resembling the initial plans, as a&nbsp;result of this, I constantly checked the script and storyboard. I understood from other research that the structure of the film may need to change. Just&nbsp;because the story worked&nbsp;in a script, doesn't mean it'll work on the screen. Fortunately, I&nbsp;didn't feel the need to change the structure and this maintained throughout the entire project, from plans to final&nbsp;product. I added&nbsp;parts in to the edit that&nbsp;weren't initially thought of, for example, the voice over and GVs but these&nbsp;didn't change the structure of the story, just added to it.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In addition to my research, I also looked into editing comedy and in particular the editing of&nbsp;<i>The Thick Of It,&nbsp;</i>our inspiration for VET-MAN which helped me edit the rough cut. I made sure to follow their techniques of using camera movements like zooming and panning to my advantage, and I also held on appropriate reaction shots, as long as they added to the comedy aspect of the film. I initially took on Anthony Boys' advice about watching every frame by sitting with Katie when she briefly cut the first two shoot days together. His explanation of how timing is instinctive, I cut the specific shots when I felt it was right and then to get a second opinion, I asked other students with fresh minds to the project when they would cut it. As I learnt, there is not set way or time in which to cut something in comedy, it is purely down to when it feels right to do so. I took on the advice of not being afraid to cut something, if it wasn't working, such as some of the voice over we had planned, then it was cut. The storytelling of the film is the priority when creating a rough cut. The refinement of the film continued into the fine cut when Katie took it over with a fresh mind, allowing the comedy to flow better.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To continue with my creative role of producer, I scheduled fine cut viewings with Alex and Katie to view the progress of the film. As producer, I need to make sure&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">everyone is on task to help "</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">bring the creative vision to life" (Martin, 2013). As a result of this, I need to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">be involved with the whole production, from beginning to the final product so it was necessary that I had the opportunity to give feedback as well as Alex, as the director.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What went well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- During my research of the script read through, I discovered that it was known to organise first meetings like this in someones living room. While reading this, I had already decided that without a doubt the meeting would be held at the Studios, due to the more professional environment and ease for everyone to get to. During the main shoot week, I found out that this was the correct choice, as I was talking to one of the cast members about meeting with new people at the beginning of projects and they explained that they are always weary if the first meeting is scheduled in someones house. They found this uncomfortable as they haven't met the new group yet and to meet at someones house first could be dangerous for all they know. Once I had heard about this, I immediately realised that organising the script read through for the Studios was the best possible scenario. If I had arranged it for someones house, it sounds as if we might have lost that cast member as they wouldn't be comfortable for the first meeting to be at someones house. Although, Alex and I met with all the cast members at the auditions, they didn't meet each other until the script read through, so I can understand where the uneasiness would have come from. Thinking back to that shoot day, I am very pleased with myself for following my mind and agreeing that the Studios was the best place to meet.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The blood splatter in the re-shoot went really well. We managed to get the splatter in one take and we were really happy with the result. The blood stained hands also looked effective, especially when Tim touches Sheila and Luke's arm and gets a hand print on their clothes. As the blood was a vital part of the story, it had to look right in order to help the story along. In this sense, it was worth putting more money into the budget to allow the re-shoot to happen, as we didn't have the same reaction on the first rough cut than we did on the third when the new footage was in place.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The production&nbsp;schedule stayed the same throughout the&nbsp;whole of the shooting period. We either finished on time or earlier, we didn't have to stay later on any of the days unexpectedly. I believe that this shows I created an achievable schedule, and the fact that I created it at the beginning of the project before the shooting period makes me believe that I thought ahead and correctly decided how long we would take to shoot each scene. By keeping to schedule we were able to complete additional tasks with the cast, such as capture the poster photos.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- In terms of shooting locations, I only had to change one of them from the pre-production package, however, this didn't interfere with any other aspects in production. For example, I didn't have to let down a location and try to contact another. As the location I changed was only a road, I simply just had to contact the residents and let them know what we were planning on doing. I also contacted the Kent Film Office, but as I hadn't done this yet with the initial location, I didn't have to do it twice. As a result of this, changing the location was simple. The other locations didn't change. We had doubts about one location in the pre-production stage (Tess' house), however, we were able to use this in the end with no problems. Although I was constantly updating The Bell Inn throughout pre-production and production, they easily could have contacted me and explained that we couldn't use it anymore. Fortunately, they didn't and we had a successful shoot day on their premises. I was confident that the Owl Academy wouldn't turn us down as Alex is good friends with the owner, however, it was still a possibility for them to say that we couldn't film there, so I was grateful that we were allowed throughout production. The access we had on site was also really beneficial for the shots we wanted and for the promo photos.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- During the shoot days I realised how much we benefited from having the additional crew. Gina and Harriet were very helpful in terms of doing jobs so we didn't have to. BTS photos and production stills are a requirement for the major project hand in so it was helpful to have someone there taking high quality photos for us. We wouldn't have been able to get as many as she did if we had to take them ourselves. Harriet was also really helpful in terms of making sure the props were in place ready for shooting. If we didn't have her I can imagine that we would have needed to reset more takes than normal because we probably would have had realised that a prop was out of place for the character to use.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I believe I successfully helped us keep to the shot list and production schedule on the shoot days. We captured everything we needed by the end of each shoot day. Even on the Margate shoot when we felt rushed, we managed to get all the footage we needed, it just wasn't up to the standard we wanted which was why a re-shoot was required. Keeping everyone on track on the shoot days was originally Simon's suggestion, and as it went well, I believe that I followed and carried out his advice accordingly, creating a number of smooth-running shoot days.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I worked on the edit as a whole like I was advised to. This made the edit process easier when it came to viewings. The only time when a part of the edit may have been more developed than the rest was just before the re-shoot. I worked on the scenes that didn't need re-shooting and then worked just on the new footage after the re-shoot, however, I didn't do a lot to the other scenes just a bit of refining until I was able to work with the new footage. Once it was all on the timeline, I was able to carry on refining the edit as a whole.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- When aspects of filming didn't quite go to plan, I was able to think quickly as producer or editor in order to help resolve them. An example being during the night scene when we found out about the sensor light, we all thought quickly about how it could work by using it in the story. This worked really well in the end and we didn't lose any production value over it.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- In the end, all 8 shoot days were very productive, including the re-shoot and GV pickups, I was there primarily to make sure the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">shoot days went smoothly under the control of the director. To ensure we had all the shots that were listed in our pre-production package, and to make sure the production schedule was followed. I believe I took on the role of producer well during the production stage and incorporated some of my research of essentially being a second director and just making sure everything was controlled. I suggesting ideas to Alex where I could which were beneficial in some places of the story. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I actually enjoyed budgeting for the film. I found a simple way of doing it by reading through the script drafts and noting down items and costumes that would be needed. In terms of travel, I was able to get an estimate of everyone's travel costs just by knowing where they lived. When it came to reimbursing the money back to the cast and crew, I believe I carried this out professionally. I reimbursed the cast and crew the day after we wrapped on the main shoot week, and I reimbursed them again the day after the re-shoot and voice over day, without fail. I explained from the start that I would reimburse on the following day after the wrap and I followed this through on both occasions. In addition to this, the reimbursement process was mentioned in the feedback form, explaining that it was '</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">simple, transparent, and prompt'.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I believe that I created achievable production schedules for what&nbsp;needed to be completed on each shoot day. There wasn't an occasion where we ran late, only on time or&nbsp;earlier than&nbsp;scheduled. Again, the feedback&nbsp;form reflected this as one of the answers explained&nbsp;that we 'always finished on time or sooner, which was especially helpful for planning travel home'. The successful schedule was helped by&nbsp;liaising with Alex to find out what specific scenes he wanted to do on&nbsp;what days. Once I had this information, I was able to find an achievable way of doing what he&nbsp;envisioned for his shoot days.&nbsp;</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- In terms of the feedback form, o</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">verall the answers were very positive. The questionnaire was&nbsp;anonymous so we couldn't tell who said what answer but I was grateful for the good feedback. My questions were&nbsp;primarily about the&nbsp;organisation of the project, whether they felt kept in the loop throughout production, food choices and&nbsp;reimbursement method. Generally, they felt that they were kept updated throughout the production. One answer&nbsp;mentioned the voiceover day which were&nbsp;weren't quite prepared for, however, Alex and I made sure the day wasn't a waste and thankfully, the cast member&nbsp;acknowledged this. We were able to conduct other work to do with the film on this day. After reading this answer, I was grateful that they understood the fact that Alex and I tried our best to make the day worth it for them coming in. Another answer&nbsp;detailed that 'c</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">ommunication was professional, polite, and friendly'. This was an&nbsp;important point for me, as the producer, I need to make sure everyone knows what is happening and&nbsp;feels comfortable throughout production, and&nbsp;after reading this comment I&nbsp;believe I did this well.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">All of the questions aimed at the organisational side and production of the film were answered with a 4 or 5 (5 being the&nbsp;highest) so I was pleased with this.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I believe I got the last rough cut to a good standard ready for Katie when she took over. My reasoning for this is that the final film doesn't look too far off from my last rough cut. Katie also only made minimal changes to the visuals which means I took on the role of rough cut editor well throughout the post-production stage to get it to a good standard. I believe that getting it to the stage it was before passing it on was also down to the good relationship with Alex. A</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">s editor and director, we worked well&nbsp;throughout the edit. By having good&nbsp;communication skills I believe I was able to get it to it's best before passing it on.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I believe I referred back to the pre-production package many times throughout this unit. This was beneficial in the fact that I didn't have to research again into aspects of production, I was able to spend that time wisely by further researching and reflecting back on the package, instead of re-doing the research.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- As I mentioned previously in my comparison of the final product to our&nbsp;initial plans, I believe I took on the creative side to producing&nbsp;well, ensuring we had every shot which was&nbsp;originally planned to make sure our&nbsp;final product matched with our&nbsp;initial plans and ideas. When it came to passing on the edit for the fine cut, I scheduled regular viewings with Katie and Alex to see how the edit was going. I was there predominantly to ensure our initial vision was coming across in the edit, which it did really well. The fact that our final product isn't far off the latest script draft is evidence of this.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What didn't go so well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I was really&nbsp;disappointed with the doctors bag. As shown in <i>Shoot Day 1 &amp; 2</i>&nbsp;blog&nbsp;post, I had ordered and paid for a second hand, leather doctors bag which would have been perfect for the father's work bag. However, it&nbsp;didn't arrive. The night before the first shoot day I was still waiting and tracking the postal service but unfortunately it&nbsp;didn't turn up. As a result of this, we had to improvise and re-design one of Katie's bags. The bag was a leather briefcase bag, but it was slightly smaller which gave off a feminine look to the bag. From the script, the bag seemed as if it was big, bulky and manly, so when we decided to use the smaller bag, I knew it wouldn't give off the same impression the bag on order would have. Nevertheless, Dan explained that the small&nbsp;briefcase bag actually looked quite comedic. The fact that we built up the tension for the bag in the first scene and then it turns out to be a small, more&nbsp;feminine&nbsp;type of bag made the idea of the iconic bag&nbsp;funnier in his opinion.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The make-up didn't look quite the same in the trial as it did on camera. This wasn't the make-up artists fault, if we had known that the black and red eyes looked slightly unrealistic on the camera then she could have easily changed them as she is experienced in that type of make-up. Unfortunately, I didn't think to review the footage that day, as long as the shots were crossed off I was positive about the day. Nevertheless, the make-up looked better once the colour grade was complete.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Simon suggested that we should have kept Tim in his blood stained costume and mask rather than getting him changed. Having Tim attend the Owl Academy in blood stained clothes would have added to the comedy aspect more. However, none of us thought of this&nbsp;during the shooting period. Initially, it was my job to&nbsp;source the costumes&nbsp;that Alex wanted for his cast. He wrote in the script&nbsp;that Tim changes into a hoodie, and as a result of that, I told our cast&nbsp;member to bring clothes to change into.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Although I said budgeting and scheduling went well, I also lacked on these skills slightly as we ended up going over the budget and we didn't follow the post-production schedule well. I struggled to think of every single aspect we were going to have to pay for when I first planned the budget in the pre-production stage, however, I made sure we were on track throughout the whole of production and I made sure these extra costs were affordable for us. I also checked with Katie and Alex to see if they were happy spending the extra money as well. These extra costs allowed us to create the best quality film that we could.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We&nbsp;didn't keep to the&nbsp;post-production&nbsp;schedule during the beginning of the edit&nbsp;because I&nbsp;didn't&nbsp;schedule everything which needed to happen in the edit, and therefore we went over the schedule. I found it hard to plan something so far in advance and as I was very busy during the pre-production stage, I wasn't focusing on the post-production as much as I should. I know schedules are&nbsp;inevitably going to change and develop, however, we would have been on&nbsp;schedule more if I had considered time to sync the audio and given more time&nbsp;in-between rough and fine cuts for re-shoots. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- In terms of actually writing the blog post, I wasn't entirely sure how to approach the shoot day posts. As director and DoP, I understand that Alex and Katie would have a lot more to write about, however, I struggled to write a detailed piece. I am taking on the creative role and organisational role of producing but</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;in terms of being creative, I had to make sure we had all the correct shots from the shot list and make sure we had all costumes and props ready for the shoot day. I was also able to act as a second director as I found&nbsp;throughout my research, but as Alex had it&nbsp;under control and had his own ideas, I&nbsp;didn't need to intervene as much as I thought I might. As a&nbsp;result of this, I used the time in the blog post to explain and evaluate my producer tasks from the pre-production&nbsp;package, such as crew, props, costume, location etc.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Marketing was definitely my weakest point within the producer role. I struggled with this in the pre-production unit as well. Although contacting Oscar and Emily helped me think of additional ideas and more creative ways to tackle advertising, especially on social media as this was my main marketing method, I still didn't quite feel satisfied with my final advertising methods. Advertising and marketing my work was a new experience for me in the final year of University and it's not something I did for previous work. I think my lack of experience shows in my marketing attempts as I wasn't confident in them from the start. Contacting different people did help and give me inspiration for ideas I wouldn't have otherwise thought of, however, I am unsure whether my marketing techniques were as expected.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What would I do differently next time?</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;Throughout my research I learnt to&nbsp;conduct the script read through as&nbsp;early as possible in case I felt that one of the cast members wasn't quite right for the film. However, due to everyones busy timetables, I could only schedule the script read through for a few weeks before we were due to start filming. Luckily, as I thought, all our cast members were perfect for their parts, however, if we weren't as lucky, we would only have had a couple of weeks in which to find someone to replace them which would have been&nbsp;difficult and possibly impossible given the short amount of time the new member would need to get on board and learn their lines. As a result of this, if I was to do a&nbsp;project like this again I would try harder to arrange a suitable time in which to conduct the script read through,&nbsp;giving me a sizeable amount of time before the filming period where I could&nbsp;have changed cast if it was needed.&nbsp;</span><br /><div><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I felt that some aspects of my marketing methods went well, such as the cast and crew introductions for social media, however, if i was to&nbsp;promote a film again, I would have introduced the cast first before posting BTS and promo photos. Essentially the followers saw the characters first without&nbsp;being introduced, but this should have happened the other way round. On the other hand, we&nbsp;didn't have any professional looking photos until the shoot days so that had to come first. In this sense I could have got the photos from the shoot days and then introduced the cast, but the only problem with that is that the social media wouldn't then be up-to-date like I would prefer.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What did I learn?</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Make sure I give time for every aspect of production. We struggled to follow the post-production schedule because I hadn't given enough time for the rough cut or any room for re-shoots. These are vital areas of post-production and I have now learnt how long they take to perfect. To do them correctly, they need more time to be scheduled for them.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Although I ordered the doctors bag well in advance, I have learnt to order items even further in advance to prevent them not turning up. If I had done this even further in advance then I would have had more time finding out where the parcel had got to, and I may have been able to amend it before the shoot day.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I have learnt to check&nbsp;the footage&nbsp;myself on the&nbsp;camera. Reflecting back on Tim's make-up, I was&nbsp;surprised as the&nbsp;difference to how it looked on camera to how it looked in person. If it looked terrible on camera I have no doubts that Katie would have said something, I&nbsp;think I still should have looked to see if it could be made better. This wasn't a&nbsp;big issue as it was corrected in the colour grade, however, it may have saved some time in the edit.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I have learnt a lot of&nbsp;valuable things about producing. I&nbsp;didn't realise how much responsibility the producer had on shoot days as their job is primarily in the pre-production&nbsp;stage. I also&nbsp;didn't quite&nbsp;comprehend the role of creative producer in our previous unit, but I believe that I have learnt from further research&nbsp;and I took to the creative side of producing well, helping to bring the creative vision to life.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>References:</i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Martin, G. (2013).&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Why Producers Are More Important Than Any Good Photographer. Available at: </span><a href="https://fstoppers.com/interview/why-producers-are-more-important-any-good-photographer-1525" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">https://fstoppers.com/interview/why-producers-are-more-important-any-good-photographer-1525</a><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">. Last accessed 3rd Feb 2019.</span></i></div></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-77547151781130095542019-05-07T23:32:00.000+01:002019-05-10T07:34:14.187+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Submission<div style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The following components complete the submission of VET-MAN, along with the research and development journal:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Production stills x3</b></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ggTkdpytlww/XNK1d_7eZ1I/AAAAAAAAD8E/8L14HRj7JVMVRoZfYjlCVuq0bLwYFtolgCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0197.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ggTkdpytlww/XNK1d_7eZ1I/AAAAAAAAD8E/8L14HRj7JVMVRoZfYjlCVuq0bLwYFtolgCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_0197.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HLZHmIerZYY/XNK09L-kQRI/AAAAAAAAD70/TOGxedOqLloPFcql6EESscN2Qt8mMqipQCLcBGAs/s1600/Action%2B3.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HLZHmIerZYY/XNK09L-kQRI/AAAAAAAAD70/TOGxedOqLloPFcql6EESscN2Qt8mMqipQCLcBGAs/s640/Action%2B3.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-2VDBg_uewus/XNK1Be3icVI/AAAAAAAAD74/bV9brZ_Bue0vqD3zCKNvRvnfdo8-MACoQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screenshot%2B2019-03-26%2Bat%2B11.47.32.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-2VDBg_uewus/XNK1Be3icVI/AAAAAAAAD74/bV9brZ_Bue0vqD3zCKNvRvnfdo8-MACoQCLcBGAs/s640/Screenshot%2B2019-03-26%2Bat%2B11.47.32.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><br /></div><div style="text-align: left;"><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">BTS photos x2</b><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-m2LlpHMpxsY/XNK1e77AUeI/AAAAAAAAD8I/LL6v_UmbljQPe4rLuASYelpDx0VCjQZ7wCLcBGAs/s1600/BTS%2B1.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1068" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-m2LlpHMpxsY/XNK1e77AUeI/AAAAAAAAD8I/LL6v_UmbljQPe4rLuASYelpDx0VCjQZ7wCLcBGAs/s640/BTS%2B1.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-OAVTv0d_fmA/XNK1jXY8ylI/AAAAAAAAD8M/XxlifXzuZpwyWWxNhQkt-E2wu2jngfxngCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0176.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-OAVTv0d_fmA/XNK1jXY8ylI/AAAAAAAAD8M/XxlifXzuZpwyWWxNhQkt-E2wu2jngfxngCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_0176.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><div><br /><br /></div><div><div style="text-align: center;"><div style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>A1 poster</b></span></div></div></div><div><br /></div><div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_AQJETT6RqI/XNKxwz_iCwI/AAAAAAAAD7o/FY95bv3tRx4gtj7_PqJeHEF8XjpJiVFSgCLcBGAs/s1600/VERT%2BPOSTER%2B5.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="1132" height="640" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_AQJETT6RqI/XNKxwz_iCwI/AAAAAAAAD7o/FY95bv3tRx4gtj7_PqJeHEF8XjpJiVFSgCLcBGAs/s640/VERT%2BPOSTER%2B5.jpg" width="452" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="font-weight: bold; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>2-3 minute extract</b></span></div><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/93yJZ2fWK7Y" width="560"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><div style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>VET-MAN final film</b></span></div></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span></div><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/X6dY9rCakyo" width="560"></iframe><br />Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-46706427725672923782019-05-06T16:31:00.000+01:002019-05-09T23:05:13.227+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Comparison of Finished Work from Original Research & Plans<b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Producing</b><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I thought it may be&nbsp;beneficial to reflect back over the&nbsp;project as a whole to see how it has&nbsp;developed from original research and plans to how it has ended up. As I have taken on two roles throughout the project, I have split the comparisons up as two sections. I have already compared some aspects of the project&nbsp;such as the budget and the post-production&nbsp;schedule, these will be found in blog posts <i>Final Budget </i>and&nbsp;<i>Development of Post-Production Schedule.</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The props I had first noted down after reading through the first draft of the script decreased to the amount we actually had on during production. Below is the first prop list compared with the final prop list:</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-F4qy7Vy1ytY/XM9TqjtytNI/AAAAAAAAD2o/6K6WF_7as10G87jac-LpgGFl98VwFjRWACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B22.20.14.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1076" data-original-width="942" height="400" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-F4qy7Vy1ytY/XM9TqjtytNI/AAAAAAAAD2o/6K6WF_7as10G87jac-LpgGFl98VwFjRWACLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B22.20.14.png" width="350" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The first prop list contains 33 items while the final prop list only contains 29.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This shows that the number of props we needed only went down by 4 items.&nbsp;Although this is a comparison against the first and last prop list, this number&nbsp;fluctuated throughout the project as I added and took off props according to the latest script draft.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I constantly changed the number of props throughout pre-production and production to ensure I had the correct number of items we would need for filming.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We decreased in the amount of props needed by the&nbsp;shooting period, however, some of these props changed completely throughout the development of the project.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">For example, when the the shoot weeks came we didn't need the hammer, blanket and door lock for the owl enclosure, but we needed photos of Skevy and photo frames and a USB stick. These changes to the props were all achievable and they helped add to the believability of the story, for example, having the idea of Skevy's photos to signify the older, more successful sister. These simple props gave more background information about the characters to the audience.</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the list above the first set of props are what stayed the same from&nbsp;pre-production through to production. The props after the gap on the first prop list are the ones that were taken out of the script and therefore, off the list. The items after the gap on the final prop list were&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">added into script drafts and were kept in the story.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Costume</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The costume with the characters stayed the same from when we planned that they were going to wear to what they actually wore during production. Alex and I agreed that Luke should be wearing lighter coloured clothing so show his innocence and Tim wearing darker coloured clothing to show a contrast. We decided exactly what they would wear at the script read through as we were able to talk to both Ed and Dan in person to see what sort of clothing they had.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Becky's costume stayed the same throughout pre-production and into production as her clothing was quite obvious for her role in the film. She played Mollie who is the owner of The Kent Owl Academy. Playing this role meant that she had to look like the employees at the academy. I took note of this and explained to her the costume requirements at the script read through. All she needed was black leggings or jeans, boots and something warm for her top half, as we had sourced her a Kent Owl Academy fleece on the shoot day.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Skevy's costume also stayed the same throughout planning and shooting. As she is a successful estate agent we wanted her in smart clothing. Although the days we were shooting could have been her days off from work in the story, we wanted to establish her character in the scenes she was in. As she was only in the two scenes for a short period of time, this meant we wanted her wearing her smart clothes of the duration of her time in the story.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sue was able to wear whatever she wanted, all we asked for was that it was something she would wear as everyday clothes. As a result of this, I didn't speak to Sue again about specific clothing until it came to the re-shoot. For this, I asked her to wear the same clothes she did in the shoot week incase we wanted to use some of the initial footage we captured. The minimal clothes advice went for Al as well. I explained that he could wear anything he wanted with the only requirement of wearing a leather jacket to help establish the biker / intimidating look we wanted from Mark. As result of the costumes staying the same as we planned, apart from the extra costume for Mark, I believe these aspects of the final film matched up with our initial plans quite well.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Cast</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We gained a cast member in between pre-production and production with Al. Sue suggested him to us. Previously, we were going to have Alex's dad stand in for Mark as it is not a speaking role and we just wanted a big built male for Tim to feel intimidated by. However, we were glad to welcome Al so we had a full professional cast. The only requirement I wanted from Al was that he was tall. I found out that he was 6 foot 1in which we believed to be tall enough for Mark. Apart from the additional cast member, all other cast stayed the same throughout pre-production and production. This was beneficial because Alex and I didn't have to look for more cast members throughout production. I believe that keeping the cast members on board was my responsibility and I feel that I did a good job in keeping them up-to-date and interested in the project. I can only imagine the extra work we would have had to put in trying to find new cast members if they didn't stay on board so I am very grateful that they did.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Crew</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the cast, I gained a couple of additional crew members. I recruited Harriet as on-set dresser and Gina as photographer. This was recommended to me before production so we could concentrate on our own roles rather than concerning ourselves with prop and set dressing and taking promo photos. I am glad I took on the advice in the end because it was helpful during filming to not have to worry about the location set up or taking the photos. There were a couple of days when we didn't have Gina, however, these were minor locations such as Tess's house. I still took a few photos to put into the blog post but I took a significantly less amount than what Gina took on the shoot days when she was present. This explained the importance of a photographer on the shoot days because I just didn't have the time to take photos and then before we knew it, the day was over and the opportunity for photos had disappeared. In addition to this, Harriet also benefited us on location. Having her on hand to sort the props by making sure they were back in place for the next take meant that we didn't have to stop and move the prop if we had forgotten to reset it before. I can imagine that we all would have been too busy to remember where a prop was to start with until the character came to use it and it wasn't there.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Unfortunately, the crew I mentioned in the pre-production package changed throughout the production period. Previously, I stated that we would have Alix and Katthaliya throughout the production period, but in the end we only had them for about 4 days of production rather than 6. Fortunately, I was able to get other students from our University course to stand in as sound operators and runners. We still benefited from this as they knew what they were doing with the equipment due to taking the same course as us. Although we didn't have Alix and Katthaliya for the duration of the shooting period, we always had someone on sound who knew what they were doing which meant we could still concentrate on our job roles. The runner role could be completed by anyone, however, on all of the shoot days apart from one we had someone who was on our television course.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Locations</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The locations all stayed the same from the pre-production package apart from one. I was advised at the beginning of the unit to look elsewhere for a location for the dog hit to take place on. The initial location wasn't quite right and there was no reasoning behind my decision which I agree with. As a result of this, I looked at a few more locations which were more suitable and I showed Alex photos of each one to get his opinion. We agreed on the road of St. Mary's Avenue which ended up being a suitable mix between residential and rural which is what Alex wanted.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the pre-production unit, I was unsure on the location of Tess' house as we weren't confirmed to be able to use it. However, I thought positively and we were able to use the house. This was beneficial as I didn't have to look for another house to film in.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I said previously, all location apart from the one stayed the same. We got what we wanted out of them as well, for example, we wanted the house for Sheila as it had a big drive, big enough for the crew and equipment. We liked Tess' house for the neatness and well kept aspect of it which worked well with Tess' neat and tidy character. The features of these two houses were requirements from the beginning and we managed to keep these locations through until production. As all the locations, apart from one, stayed the same and as a result of this, I believe that our final film matched up with our initial plans well.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Budget</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">There was&nbsp;quite a big change&nbsp;from the initial budget I created to what we spent by the end of production. Although there were big changes, I&nbsp;believe I improved the budget. As a&nbsp;result of this, the changes&nbsp;were very&nbsp;positive a&nbsp;because we needed each change to ensure we could create the best film&nbsp;possible. I&nbsp;didn't include&nbsp;every single outgoing in production&nbsp;that was possible, for example, van insurance for re-shoots. This was purely down to not&nbsp;realising every aspect we would need to cater for until it happened. This led us to have to put more&nbsp;money into the budget to pay for the re-shoots, voice over day and GV pickups. I started by calculating a&nbsp;budget of £1,500 and in the end we spent £1,680. As a result of this, the plans which created the budget didn't quite match up with the end product as we had to spend more to get to this stage.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Research</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As the individual producing aspects stayed the same for the majority of the time, I believe my research also stayed the same. From pre-production to production, I only developed and improved my research, rather than changing the idea and having to research again about it. The only time I repeated research may have been to look into editing, I briefly mentioned this in the pre-production unit, and explained how I would be the offline editor while Katie is the online editor, however, this changed when it came to post-production as we referred to ourselves as rough and fine cut editors. I learnt the comparison between offline and online and that it differs to rough and fine cutting. Throughout the course we have known to do rough and fine cuts so it made sense to follow these titles into the major project.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Production</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During production we changed a couple of lines and actions from the script as they simply felt more suitable when the characters were in the moment. Ed was really helpful in giving advice towards the film, he would constantly suggest different lines to say which helped the story flow and some of these lines were more amusing than what was written in the script. We were open to suggestions so some of the lines are different to what was in the script to what is now in the film. Some of the lines Ed changed were:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- "young padawan"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- "the game is a foot"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the script we hadn't referenced why Tim and Luke got changed. We realised this and added to their lines, so Tim's line was originally - "there's not much else we can do now is there? And I can't go around looking like Patrick fu*king Bateman, can I? Besides, it's your fault, you distracted me" - whereas now he explains - "I can't go around looking like Patrick fu*king Bateman can I? I need to get changed. Besides..." - although we realise now that getting the characters changed wasn't the best idea, our main priority was that the story flowed smoothly and we though that it would be odd to see the characters in different costumes without referencing it. We did the same with Luke by getting him to say - "I'll get my coat" - after Tim hits his arm with his blood stained hand, rather than originally described in the script as a direction where Luke 'looks down at his sleeve which now has a big bloody patch on'.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the script, Tim is looking at his photo in scene 6 when Luke runs back to the van after his encounter with Sheila, instead as we had to reference the characters getting changed, we positioned Tim with the scrubs in his hands at the back of the van. When Luke runs by, Tim throws the clothes in the back and speeds off in the van. Also in this scene, the script describes the cat as 'curled up in a bush'. In the main shoot week we had the cat across the road under a garden gate, and in the re-shoot and final take we have the cat sat under a car. We changed the line in the script accordingly because we realised we didn't have a bush close enough to put the cat under. Fortunately, this wasn't a big amendment and it didn't take any production values away from the story.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 10 changed significantly to the original plan in the script due to the unexpected sensor light turning on and off whenever someone walked past it. As the light was next to the enclosures it was difficult to stop it from turning on. The script initially suggested Luke simply running down to the enclosure, drugging the owl and then returning to Tim before running off. However, we had to change this on the shoot. We had to play the sensor light into the film by Luke becoming startled by it and running faster to the enclosure. Shortly after this he emerged from the enclosure and ran off with Tim. During one of the takes, Ed suggested giving silly hand signals to Luke as there wasn't any dialogue to this scene. This looked really good and added to the comedy in the film at the time.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The script initially described the dead owl as laying 'in a pile of blood and feathers', and along with this the owl was meant to 'twitch'. From the start this was going to be difficult to create. During the shoot day, instead of seeing the fake owl on the floor our runner sprinkled feathers over the top of the camera. The camera was facing Mollies angry face, which then prompts the idea of her punching Tim. We decided against seeing the fake owl on the floor because it would be revealed to the audience as a fake owl and we want to keep the believability of the film throughout. By shooting the aftermath of the owl punch in this way, it also gave us a reason not to show the owl 'twitch' as this would have been difficult to create as well.</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In scene 12, the script paints the picture of Tim taking a second sip of his drink after saying - "look here you old bag" - and before - "you're not Sheila" - whereas on the shoot day, the action of Tim getting up off the seat and&nbsp;swinging round to face Mark worked well as a&nbsp;whole movement, rather than breaking it up with a sip of his drink in the middle. The effective swinging&nbsp;movement worked&nbsp;really well and allowed the take to flow better, which is why we changed to this from the original script.</span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Editing</b></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I created the rough cut of the film which meant that I had to get it to a standard of what it may look like by the end of the project. Creating the rough cut meant that I was responsible for the visuals and making sure they matched what was already planned in the script and storyboard, or changing it so the story flowed better in a different order to what was already planned. As I didn't work as the editor throughout the entirety of the project, I can compare the edit in two ways, one from the initial plans through the storyboard and script, and the other, comparing the edit from the first rough cut to my third rough cut, to then the final piece.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I believe the edit represents the script quite well as the structure didn't change from the progression from script to screen. The main scenes displayed in the script are the same scenes that are in the edit and they are in the same order as well. Throughout production we developed a few aspects to the story with the additional GVs. We refined the edit and cut out some shots that weren't benefiting the story, however the GVs and voice overs were the only things that weren't included in the script before production. This was something that was considered after watching the edit and seeing how it transitioned from one scene to the next.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Although the story structure didn't change much from pre-production to the end of the project, the rough cuts I created vary slightly. I refined a lot from the original script, the final script finished at 19 pages which means the film should have been at about 19 minutes in length. However, as we are creating a comedy, the editing needed to be fast paced and choppy to help get the humour across successfully. Due to this, I cut down the edit quite significantly to 16 minutes and 26 seconds in my final rough cut. The fine cut got the film down to about 15 minutes 33 seconds. Altogether we shaved off nearly 4 minutes from the original production script (latest draft). The first rough cut was purely about getting the footage onto the timeline in the correct order to see if it worked or not. Although we needed a re-shoot and some additional GVs, the general tone of the film worked. We agreed that the structure was there and the story progressed from scene to scene.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Reflecting back on the script (draft 8), I made minor changes throughout each rough cut to take the story from as described in the script to the final film. We shot scene 1 with Tim picking up the framed photos of his sister, however this changed over the course of the rough cuts so he just looks at the frame rather than picking it up. By cutting it like this, I was able to make the sequence quicker and flow better, we were able to move onto the main focus of this scene - printing out the fake diploma. With the same idea in mind, I also refined scene 2. The script describes Luke shutting the side door on the van before getting into the passenger side, however, I realised I was watching someone close a door and get into a van which wasn't essential for the story. As a result of this, I cut from Tim's disappointment towards the slogan on the van, to both characters sitting in the front of the van ready to drive away. Again, this shaved off a couple of crucial seconds making the edit faster paced. In scene 3, the script describes Sheila only calling for Sooty once, when in the edit I prolonged this slightly to help build the tension of the surgery scene. This scene was the one exception I made to hold the shot rather than feel the need to cut quickly for the comedy aspect. When Tim puts his hand on Sheila's shoulder her facial expression is really impressive and she looks horrified. Due to this expression bringing the comedy to this specific shot, I felt that it would be more comedic to hold the shot rather than cut back and fourth between Tim and Sheila. The cuts weren't evident in the script, however, this shot was significant as it was the only time I didn't obey the quick cutting rule for the comedy. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In scene 8 when Tim and Luke first meet Mollie, there is a lot of 'to and fourth' between the owl Mollie is feeding and Luke. This sounded effective in the script to bring across Luke's hatred of owls, however, it didn't quite work in the edit because the conversation stopped. Firstly, I tried having the conversation with Tim and Mollie over the top of the reverse shots of the owl and Luke, however, there wasn't enough time to for Tim and Mollies shots as well and they are the people talking so it was necessary to see them. As a result of this, I cut the scene down slightly by minimising the amount of times I cut back to Luke and the owl, instead I focused more on the conversation between Tim and Mollie and cut to see Luke's reaction of the owl once or twice.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The hand signals in the night scene (scene 10) were difficult to see on the edit due to filming it at night with limited artificial lighting. As a result of this, I completed the first edit with the hand signals included, before cutting them out by the final rough cut. They added humour to the story but as they were difficult to see, this took away from the comedy and therefore, didn't add anything productive to the story which meant I had to make the decision to cut them out. This did benefit the film as it shaved off a few seconds. In this case, the hand signals weren't in the script and they weren't in the final edit so it's as if they were never thought of. I felt that it was important to highlight this to show the development process I went through in production and into the edit from the script. In addition to this, the script describes Luke meeting back with Tim and they both run off, I ended up cutting the scene when Luke enters the owl enclosure as it wasn't really adding anything to the story of Luke running back up the path to Tim.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The final scene was described in the script as watching the van reverse out of the parking space and out of the car park. However, when it came to the edit, this manoeuvre seemed pointless as it didn't add anything to the story. As a result of this, I cut the film at Tim's reaction of Luke's - "what does it taste like?". Cutting on the reaction shot is more amusing for the audience rather than finishing the film on a long winded shot of a van driving around, which is why I made this choice in the rough cut.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During the post-production stage, Alex and I held a voice over day. This was to record&nbsp;dialogue to be used at different parts of the film. We wanted some over shots of the van, and Alex came up with the idea of having a short conversation between Tim and Luke to be put over the credits. At this point we were&nbsp;moving away from&nbsp;the idea of&nbsp;music but we needed something for the end credits. As a&nbsp;result of this, we&nbsp;thought that Ed and Dan could improvise a funny conversation for the&nbsp;audience to enjoy whilst reading our credits, and we received this on the voice over day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The rest of the edit&nbsp;simply needed refining rather than cutting bits out&nbsp;completely. Comparing the edit to the script is&nbsp;beneficial. It's interesting to see how a script works and then the same story and scenes don't work as well in the edit. My changes were minimal compared to what could have been changed. Fortunately, I&nbsp;didn't have to change&nbsp;the structure of the edit and the general tone of the film worked well.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I&nbsp;believe&nbsp;that the final product matches up with the initial plans we made quite well.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Reflecting back on to the&nbsp;different aspects of producing, there wasn't a lot of change from&nbsp;initial&nbsp;plans to when it came to production and editing. I&nbsp;believe that means that we planned the film really well. All locations, apart from one, stayed the same. All costumes stayed the same to the&nbsp;initial mood boards I created in the pre-production package. The props may have changed the most over the course of the project&nbsp;because these&nbsp;developed with each script draft. The biggest change may&nbsp;have been the budget,&nbsp;as we overspent by £180.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In addition to this, I believe having the creative control over each shoot day by being on hand for the director, and checking shots and coverage were as initially envisioned, helped create a final product that matches up with our original ideas. If I didn't take on the creative side to producing and didn't have a list of shots to obtain on each shoot day, our final product may not resemble our original plans as much. As a result of this, I believe I did my job correctly on shoot days as the creative producer to help the film get to where we wanted it from the beginning.&nbsp;</span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-8447435173733227022019-04-30T22:53:00.000+01:002019-05-09T23:05:03.477+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Group Viewing on Big Screen, Grade Day & Final Viewing<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>BIG SCREEN VIEWING</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We were&nbsp;scheduled a&nbsp;viewing on the big screen with the rest of our year group. We had the&nbsp;opportunity to watch everyone's films to give feedback on their progress so far. I felt that this would be&nbsp;beneficial for us to make any last changes to the edit ready for our&nbsp;hand-in next week.&nbsp;</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Feedback from Simon &amp; rest of the group:</b></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Engine sound when moving</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During scene 3, Tim and Luke have already picked up the van and they are on their way to the owl academy. To get the shot to look like they're moving we filmed it while the van was stationary, and then Katie added a&nbsp;light changing effect in&nbsp;the fine cut. The effect changed the light across the frame, making it look like the&nbsp;van was moving&nbsp;with the light travelling across their faces. This worked really well, however, we were fed back that the engine sound&nbsp;didn't quite fit. As the van wasn't actually&nbsp;moving we had the&nbsp;stationary engine sound in the background which would be better than&nbsp;hearing silence as the van is meant to be moving,&nbsp;however, this was the same sound before they hit the dog, during and after when Tim had stopped the van. It was pointed out that the engine sound would be a different pitch when the van was moving to when it had stopped after hitting the dog. This means we need to layer over another engine sound on top of the part when the van is moving or just simply raise the volume level to make it louder. Usually, the engine in a&nbsp;vehicle is&nbsp;loudest when pulling away from a stationary&nbsp;position,&nbsp;however, we need to make the difference between the two engine sounds so making the&nbsp;volume louder when the van is moving should work.&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Audio in scenes 7 &amp; 9</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We were&nbsp;already aware of this point as Katie has been&nbsp;working on it throughout&nbsp;the duration of the fine cut. After trying a couple of different methods, we have decided to keep the audio as it is rather than trying to bring each individual clip down in volume as this was distorting the pitch level. However, Katie will edit the audio clip slightly by bringing the volume down as a whole rather than trying to edit bits of the individual clips to avoid making the audio pitchy. It was beneficial hearing the audio on the big screen for the second time as it sounds completely different to what it sound like in headphones. I was&nbsp;pleasantly surprised about the level of the audio on these scenes, from what I remember in the rough cut it sounded louder, which shows that Katie is&nbsp;improving the audio well.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Sound effects<br />We are aware of the fact that we still need to add in a few sound effects - when Luke drops the bag on Sheila's doorstep and the gameboy effects during the night scene. I especially noticed that the bag needed a bigger thud when it hit the floor now that we see a shot of the dog. The&nbsp;audience would be able to get a idea of the weight of the dog after seeing the&nbsp;breed of dog we are using, and as a&nbsp;result of this, I&nbsp;don't think the bag hitting the floor reflects this well. The bag seems very light when it hits the floor, and the dog is a cocker spaniel which is a reasonably sized dog. I imagine it would give a bigger thud than what we have on the edit at&nbsp;the moment.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Music<br />Simon suggested music would help bring up the quality of the film.&nbsp;As our&nbsp;inspiration, <i>The Thick Of It,</i>&nbsp;doesn't have any&nbsp;music we are reluctant to use any.&nbsp;However, I do agree that the night scene needs a bit of music and I&nbsp;believe that a heist music&nbsp;would be effective at this point in the story.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Picture is pretty much there<br />We agreed that the&nbsp;pictures are pretty much there, with a small bit of refinement left to do. Katie added in a wide shot which reveals the van slogan before our main reveal,&nbsp;which looks slightly out of place. She argued that the&nbsp;original shot of Tim sitting in the van and then turning round to&nbsp;look at the van broke the 180 degree rule,&nbsp;however, we hadn't&nbsp;received any&nbsp;criticism about this in all of our previous viewings so I&nbsp;didn't think it was a problem. Simon seemed to agree so I&nbsp;will recommend changing the shot back to how it was&nbsp;originally, allowing us to reveal the slogan in one shot.&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Unexpected comedy - cat &amp; owl &amp; pub punch</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The group were&nbsp;laughing in&nbsp;appropriate places&nbsp;throughout the film&nbsp;which was a clear sign that the comedy was being shown through the edit. Getting people to watch the film who&nbsp;don't know the premise of it is a helpful technique to see how&nbsp;the comedy is actually working. Having the group big screen viewing was a good opportunity to do this as the majority of the people in&nbsp;the room&nbsp;hadn't seen the progress of the film.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Overall, the feedback was really good and&nbsp;constructive. The changes we need to make are achievable which is the main thing. I was concerned that we would be advised to make changes that aren't possible in this late stage.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We will be&nbsp;working on the edit for the rest of the week with the aim of&nbsp;completing it a few days before the deadline, giving us time to export the final version.&nbsp;</span></div><div><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>GRADE DAY</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We had a full two days with colourist, Nathan Caws, helping us to improve the our edits. He sat down with each group individually but he was around for us to ask him questions throughout the two days. We explained the premise of the film and watched it through with Nathan first.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Feedback:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 1 - Overexposed light behind the window. The room has a good dark look to it, however the light coming through the living room window is very bright and stands out too much from the dark shots. Nathan understood that there wasn't anything we could do about the light coming through the curtains on the day, so although it can't be fixed completely we can dull the window down to match the rest of the dark shot. He showed us an example of making a box around the window and only changing the exposure of this. Then he masked it so when the camera moved the dark box stayed over the window rather than moving with the camera. This worked really well and made the bright window less obvious which was ideal. Katie will attempt this as best as she can in the final edit.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 1 - Colour grade that's already been done doesn't quite match in living room. When the light gets turned on it's quite warm (orange, yellow tones), but some shots are cold (blue tones). The colour needs to be consistent throughout the scene so make the cold shots look warmer. Katie had already applied a bit of colour grade to the edit previously, however today was about showing Nathan and seeing what the thinks of the colour she's already put on there and how we can make it even better. We didn't realise that the warm toned shots weren't consistent throughout the first scene, however, now we know we will amend these to match throughout the first scene.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 2 - Nathan explained that he couldn't read the whole slogan on the van in time before we cut away from it, this then prevented him from understanding the punch line of the reveal. This should have been changed when I had the rough cut, however, this was the first time we had received this feedback. As we know the slogan we may not have had it on the screen long enough for someone who hasn't seen the van before. This was a simple change of making the shot last slightly longer.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 4 - As we filmed the dog shot in slow motion there are slight movements from the dog's fur and the gravel that are noticeable. Due to the fact that there is movement in the scene, it makes the slow motion shot obvious. We only used slow motion because the dog wouldn't lay still for long enough, it doesn't add anything to the story and wasn't meant to be noticed. As a result of this, Nathan suggested freezing the shot because it's not a noticeably windy day so we wouldn't expect anything to move. We will</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;be able to freeze the take and it would just be seen as a static shot.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 4 - Nathan suggested speeding up the cuts during surgery in the van in an Edgar Wright style. This means we can get through quicker to the punch line of the blood splatter. Rather than spending a couple of seconds watching him put on one glove, and then the other and the rest of the takes, we could see a shot which lasts a second of the first glove, and a second of the next glove, and then cut to the flick of the needle. This makes sense and would speed up the sequence leading up to the blood splatter so we will try this out to see how it looks.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 5 - When Sheila hugs Luke after finding out about Sooty, the exposure on her hand is very bright. This was caused by the light sky outside the house on the shoot day, it may be difficult to lower the exposure without lowering the exposure of the characters and house as these are fine. We will play around with this to see how we can lower it without changing too much.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 7 - Odd cut at "That's so smart Tim!" - this may be because it's a 2 shot cutting to another 2 shot. Hold&nbsp;previous shot or change shot to different angle completely.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 11 - There is a shot of the owl flapping it's wings and the the next shot is really similar - looks as if it could be the same shot. Either change shot or zoom in or out to change perspective.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 9 - When Tim dangles the pills at the end of scene 9 it and then nods - looks as if we are waiting for something to happen. Nathan suggested seeing Tim's&nbsp;face on that shot&nbsp;because he nods. We explained that the&nbsp;original shot included a pan to Tim's face however, we changed this to focus on the pills. Nathan said that we are sat on the pills shot for long enough so maybe if we could cut before Tim nods. Then we would have shortened the take, and&nbsp;don't expect&nbsp;something to happen after Tim's nod. Or include Tim's nod completely, so his face is in the shot, rather than half off the screen.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Having Nathan come in and watch our films was beneficial. He is&nbsp;extremely knowledgable on editing and colour grading, and he gave feedback that we hadn't heard before in previous viewings. However, this came with some disadvantages. Some of his feedback would&nbsp;really improve the edit, but it would take a while to correct, which we may not be able to complete before the deadline next week. Katie is going to try and complete the feedback that Nathan suggested, however, we are unsure if we can do&nbsp;everything before the deadline.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>FINAL EDIT VIEWING&nbsp;</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We had a final viewing with Simon a few days prior to the deadline for some last minute advice. He only had minimal suggestions which was ideal just a few days before the hand in. Simon's feedback included:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Bigger on title</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The text should be bigger across the screen. The reasoning behind the smaller title was because of the&nbsp;anticlimactic idea. However, we did make the text slightly&nbsp;larger as it was quite small.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Scene 2 - shave time off reveal of drugs&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Simon suggested shaving a bit of time off the drug reveal by refining the action of Tim opening the glove compartment.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Use of a squelch sound when Tim cuts into the dog</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">When Tim slips and stabs the dog with the scalpel, Simon suggested a sound effect of a squelch. We have a quiet sound from the spray bottle that made the blood splatter however, this is really quiet underneath the dialogue from Sheila and atmos. As a result of this, Alex found a squelching sound that seemed appropriate for the spray bottle. This sound is now more defined and sounds believable.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Dialogue "as good as him" needs to go up in volume up</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Dialogue "the game is a foot" sounded a bit quiet</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Music to take us from scene 11 to scene 12. From night scene to pub location</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Simon suggested having the music from the night scene and playing it into the pub scene so it sounds like it is the pub who are playing the music. I thought this was a really good idea as it will help transition from the scenes,&nbsp;however, we initially only wanted music when Tim thinks he is being a successful vet, i.e. surgery scene and night scene, so if we were to continue the music into the pub, we&nbsp;wouldn't be following our tone throughout the film.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Mark's punch sound effect on black screen</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Simon suggested to put a punch sound&nbsp;in between scene 12 and scene 13 to signify the idea of Mark punching Tim.&nbsp;However, we liked the idea of&nbsp;leaving this to the imagination of the audience,&nbsp;and then seeing Tim with a black eye and bloody nose.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Alex wasn't sure about the final line from Luke - "what does it taste like?" - I liaised with him over this as I agreed that we didn't always quite have the reaction we wanted from the joke in some of our viewings. However, Simon reassured us that it was a good place to end the film, so we kept this in the final edit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After this tutorial Katie completed the necessary changes we discussed with Simon. There were some points we took forward and some we didn't. She tried to raise the volume on the highlighted clips to bring the sound up with the rest of the edit. She also imported another squelch sound to add to the scalpel slipping into the dog, and she made the text on the titles slightly bigger. Points we didn't take forward were the punch sound after seeing Mark when the screen goes to black. We decided against this because we wanted to leave this more to the imagination of the audience. We also didn't carry the music over from the night scene into the pub, purely because throughout the edit we have been working on the idea of using fast cuts and music to signify when we are in Tim's mind of him being a successful vet. If we were to carry the music over, then we would lose the idea of our use of music. Before we exported the final product, Katie also took out the line &nbsp;- "we need scalpels and forceps Luke, not dirty needles and hot knives" - towards the end of the film because the audio was a lot quieter than the rest of the film and it was difficult to correct. As a result of this, I was happy for it to be cut out in order to maintain the quality of the film throughout.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">For the submission for the extract, we will pick a section of the film that best represents VET-MAN and showcases important aspects of the film.&nbsp;</span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-27140608669670307532019-04-25T13:16:00.000+01:002019-05-09T23:22:36.086+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Marketing VET-MAN<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I previously gained advice from Emily and Oscar on how I should market VET-MAN. I started by taking on Oscar's advice and looking at other social media accounts to see I how they promote and market their films / product with the aim to become inspired for my own marketing.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Oscar initially suggested making a marketing schedule which I hadn't considered before speaking with him. As I have been making schedules throughout the making of VET-MAN, I understood that it may help me with my marketing. Oscar advised that I should note down what I want to share and when. This will help me see how balanced my marketing is and what part I may need to improve on. For example, I may only have a couple of posts in pre-production but maybe too many in production. This would show that I haven't really introduced the project to our followers but instead immediately focused on the filming side. From my research in the pre-production package and subsequently from Oscar, I found that it is possible to overshare on social media as the more regularly you post in a day, the less likely the posts will show to followers. This would be a bad move for a marketing strategy as you would want your posts to be shown to followers in order to get their attention. Below is the table I created detailing the different posts I have made throughout the unit on both Facebook and Instagram:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><iframe height="600" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vRmwALlDOZqH0KkNnCuf8yBc9RENs6Ym6YBoA3bQaER1oapVLlCnwlJsHPSpgPD398GmT7cl4aymkUC/pub?embedded=true" width="700"></iframe><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As it can be seen&nbsp;from the table, I posted all of the pre-production information within one month. Although this was spread out throughout the month, ideally, I should have posted more content over the months from September through to December. However, as this content was posted in November 2018, it was before the&nbsp;research I took out in&nbsp;February 2019 when I was advised to create a schedule. As a&nbsp;result of this, I have learnt from the mistake of only posting in the one month and as it can be seen from the table, I had improved this throughout&nbsp;production. I&nbsp;didn't have a lot of content to post in the January as&nbsp;all of the test shoots and work towards the project was completed in the previous unit which ended in December. We filmed in February so inevitably this would have had a&nbsp;number of posts about the shoot days. The longest time amount of time I had to market the film was in the post-production stage.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once I handed over the edit, I was able to&nbsp;focus completely on&nbsp;the social media and other marketing strategies I found through my research. As a result of this, the post-production stage is where the marketing schedule is longer. I also had more content to post at this point during the project because we had shot all of our BTS photos and production stills, and we were working on the poster. Although I spent more time marketing the film during the&nbsp;post-production&nbsp;stage than any of the other stages, this was&nbsp;expected&nbsp;because according to my previous research (blog post - <i>Development of Fine Cut and Poster</i>), the&nbsp;producer may "market...and generate a buzz for the project" (StudioBinder, n/d) during&nbsp;the&nbsp;post-production stage of a film, as well as&nbsp;overseeing the&nbsp;edit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Introducing the crew</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I posted individual photos of the production team consisting of Alex, Katie and myself during the pre-production unit. However, I hadn't considered the idea of introducing the crew to our followers until I developed my research into marketing. As a result of this, I simply updated the posts to explain a little bit more about the production team.&nbsp;</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YRwsjfbPsF0/XMdVgI1cvLI/AAAAAAAADsg/VD0-8TWxxYonEekZNaQKrnYkq3_bgknwACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.49.05.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="512" data-original-width="994" height="328" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YRwsjfbPsF0/XMdVgI1cvLI/AAAAAAAADsg/VD0-8TWxxYonEekZNaQKrnYkq3_bgknwACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.49.05.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Alex's crew introduction post</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I included a bit of background information about each of us, such as the roles in film that we are passionate about and our experience throughout our 3 years at University. I was inspired to include this information from&nbsp;<i>A Christmas Cracker</i>'s social media. As I explained in the research post, their posts are more posed and edited than ours, but I was&nbsp;still able to take inspiration from their captions.&nbsp;</span></div><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-neAFXJyDkwI/XMdViXciqqI/AAAAAAAADso/xQMMXtRmaGsaj3jlbTt_6cai4P-fcVgDwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.49.32.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="436" data-original-width="986" height="282" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-neAFXJyDkwI/XMdViXciqqI/AAAAAAAADso/xQMMXtRmaGsaj3jlbTt_6cai4P-fcVgDwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.49.32.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Katie's introduction post</span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-TTr6tfIBoRg/XMdVhx55IRI/AAAAAAAADsk/rFIZdwPUD-8o0tK2bj9zDYr0jvYkZtL1wCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.49.55.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="445" data-original-width="992" height="286" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-TTr6tfIBoRg/XMdVhx55IRI/AAAAAAAADsk/rFIZdwPUD-8o0tK2bj9zDYr0jvYkZtL1wCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.49.55.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">My introduction post - written by Alex</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">My introduction post was similar to both Alex and Katie's, however, I found out in my research that because we are creating a comedy our posts should reflect this and be light-hearted. As a result of posting it on Valentines day, Alex made up a line linking the post to the day. Silly lines like this are a good way to keep our posts amusing for our followers. This may ultimately reflect the comedy that we are creating.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Introducing the cast</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I first considered this idea during my&nbsp;research into different&nbsp;marketing techniques.&nbsp;Similarly to the crew introduction posts, I found cast introduction posts on </span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">A Christmas Cracker</i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">'s social media. Again, I thought this was a good&nbsp;idea to inform our followers as to who is playing the different roles. Relating back to my research&nbsp;into The Laughing Mirror Theatre, I noticed that they try to&nbsp;include their followers in their&nbsp;posts. I also felt that relating the posts to the&nbsp;audience was a good way to write amusing captions for our photos.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fX0dfP9_4tU/XMdRWuU5OdI/AAAAAAAADrs/vmi5Yn1sthACBMrH_mtzAZE7oZ1ipXRigCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.30.28.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="608" data-original-width="1318" height="294" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fX0dfP9_4tU/XMdRWuU5OdI/AAAAAAAADrs/vmi5Yn1sthACBMrH_mtzAZE7oZ1ipXRigCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.30.28.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Oscar advised to establish the tone of the film and write captions and statuses in that way. As VET-MAN is a comedy, I wrote an entertaining line for each&nbsp;of the cast&nbsp;members. Becky's was 'Luckily she knows what she's doing with the animals, but can the same be said for the other&nbsp;characters? You decide!'. I tried to keep the caption relevant to the film, by&nbsp;incorporating Becky's character, Mollie. Subsequently, this then linked onto the other characters by asking if our followers think they know what they're doing with the animals. This opens up the&nbsp;following&nbsp;questions for our followers - do they know what they're doing with the animals? Does that mean something bad will&nbsp;happen to the animals?&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YKUvhzG587M/XMdRWyC2mfI/AAAAAAAADr0/ixsXwLAolQ8b273Awf3PwEZwd2hRvJqlgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.30.40.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="532" data-original-width="1392" height="244" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YKUvhzG587M/XMdRWyC2mfI/AAAAAAAADr0/ixsXwLAolQ8b273Awf3PwEZwd2hRvJqlgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.30.40.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sue's comical line was - 'Wondering why she's making that face? We think you'll all be making that face when you see what we've been working on'. From when I first started to develop my marketing skills I knew I wanted to use this photo of Sue. She creates the best&nbsp;facial expressions, this can be proved by scene 4 in the film when Tim puts his blood stained hand on her shoulder along with this photo. As a result of this, I knew I would be able to link an engaging caption with this expression.</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-aB3O4cnctck/XMdRW1tQ1II/AAAAAAAADrw/Ovlle3mkFQs_0iDPsEqACf0BY4ZTQdI4QCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.30.53.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="478" data-original-width="1394" height="218" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-aB3O4cnctck/XMdRW1tQ1II/AAAAAAAADrw/Ovlle3mkFQs_0iDPsEqACf0BY4ZTQdI4QCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.30.53.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Skevy - 'Tess looks extremely fed up, but can you guess why? (or could she just be feeling a bit chilly?' Being the older sister, I wanted to incorporate this into the caption. This gives our followers to guess why she may be fed up, or what has&nbsp;happened for her to pull that disappointed expression.</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/--oviAgprLIc/XMdRdJk9QbI/AAAAAAAADr4/25PmKtFvNZ04q1hW_aLdObZj_EBb_VKjgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.31.05.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="514" data-original-width="1394" height="234" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/--oviAgprLIc/XMdRdJk9QbI/AAAAAAAADr4/25PmKtFvNZ04q1hW_aLdObZj_EBb_VKjgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.31.05.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">For Dan's light-hearted line I re-posted a photo and caption that he had already posted on his social media - '"Luke is 100% cut out for this vet thing. Honest" Yep, looks like it'. I really liked the post Dan created on&nbsp;his own social media, so I wanted to use this again on our platform. The only way to do this was to re-post it, rather than copying it and not giving him any credit towards it.</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1xtSBdtd0AY/XMdRdXxr8nI/AAAAAAAADr8/jzP6_A9uelgGNpC56tdWA__5__kymIJ4QCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.31.16.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="480" data-original-width="1392" height="220" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1xtSBdtd0AY/XMdRdXxr8nI/AAAAAAAADr8/jzP6_A9uelgGNpC56tdWA__5__kymIJ4QCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-29%2Bat%2B20.31.16.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Finally, for our main character Ed - Tim looks as if he's got into a bit of trouble! Can you guess what? Find out in May!' The photo shows Tim with blood splattered on his mask, this could get our followers thinking about the things he could have done to get blood on his face. I ended it with 'Find out in May!' because we hadn't set a release date when I posted these.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Scheduling posts</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once we had finished shooting I was the rough cut editor, and as a result of this all my time was put into making the edit resemble the final film as much as I could ready for Katie to take over. Due to this, I felt that it was appropriate to use the social media scheduling app I researched into during the pre-production package, Buffer. When I first looked into the app I was sceptical if I would actually use it or not. However, I found it a very helpful tool when I was completely focusing on the rough cut. Using Buffer meant that I was able to schedule future Instagram and Facebook posts to share automatically on the day and time that I set. Once I discovered the idea of posting cast introduction alerts to introduce our followers to our cast members, I scheduled them to share one day after another for 6 days. By doing this, I could concentrate on the edit and passing it over to Katie, while keeping our followers entertained at the same time.</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-lhHSiK1mDtI/XK0MfvyG2xI/AAAAAAAADgQ/4z1Lw6VP_aUPVn-g1mDkSz0fzjYIhrxsACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.19.31.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="842" data-original-width="1600" height="336" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-lhHSiK1mDtI/XK0MfvyG2xI/AAAAAAAADgQ/4z1Lw6VP_aUPVn-g1mDkSz0fzjYIhrxsACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.19.31.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Using Buffer to schedule posts</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I initially experimented with buffer for these posts to make sure they went out everyday at the same time. As this worked really well, I will use this technique to schedule the countdown posts as these will be posted after our deadline. The posts scheduled for the 'countdown until film release' are shown below. I have decided to start the countdown 5 days before our release date (Thursday 30th May). I initially thought of posting individual cast photos again like I did for the introductions, however, as I have done this before I decided against it. I was also inspired by the idea of putting up large bold numbers to signify a countdown from my research into <i>A Christmas Cracker. </i>Their numbers leading down until the release of their crowd funder are also designed to match their branding. I felt strongly about our numbers matching our branding as well. I felt that the countdown would make sense to follow the tone of the poster. As a result of this, I placed the countdown numbers over the top of the same background we used for the poster. Keeping with the tone of the poster, I kept the font - 'Avenir Next' in heavy. I didn't feel the need to put the numbers in a shade of red, although this is our main colour because it wouldn't have matched the poster as much. The branding between the poster and the countdown numbers flow better with these colours than if I had changed it to red.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ZxRAf7NpXZ0/XNHTRN8Q9AI/AAAAAAAAD6M/xASDCMHnuaQBs4CaZ-yMYXCM4VjjAVdvQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B19.43.07.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="698" data-original-width="1182" height="376" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ZxRAf7NpXZ0/XNHTRN8Q9AI/AAAAAAAAD6M/xASDCMHnuaQBs4CaZ-yMYXCM4VjjAVdvQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B19.43.07.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I realise that if these were to post in the order I have scheduled them, it would overtake the social media with numbers. Another point that I took from <i>A Christmas Cr</i></span><i style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">acker </i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">is that they posted&nbsp;additional photos&nbsp;in between their countdown to&nbsp;spread the numbers out slightly. I will ensure I post an extra photo a day of promo photos, allowing the numbers to be split across the social&nbsp;media&nbsp;platforms evenly.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NcSr2dNaRa4/XNHTRsWeVTI/AAAAAAAAD6Q/rIgLkX9qxzAsBWhMMfvAYbY8u0w_1q-YwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B19.43.17.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="696" data-original-width="1166" height="382" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NcSr2dNaRa4/XNHTRsWeVTI/AAAAAAAAD6Q/rIgLkX9qxzAsBWhMMfvAYbY8u0w_1q-YwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B19.43.17.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">For the release day post, I have scheduled a promo photo of Dan. I felt this was a light hearted and comedic way of explaining the release of the film, in keeping with the tone of our film as Oscar suggested.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-uaLfNKYrj5s/XNHTSb_VbhI/AAAAAAAAD6U/fvKHNSmuXhMRLSJxQ43XCntEjphz88VdgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B19.49.01.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="670" data-original-width="1158" height="370" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-uaLfNKYrj5s/XNHTSb_VbhI/AAAAAAAAD6U/fvKHNSmuXhMRLSJxQ43XCntEjphz88VdgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B19.49.01.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Keeping the social media up to date</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Apart from the tactical posts which add to marketing VET-MAN&nbsp;such as the crew and cast&nbsp;introduction posts, I had to constantly post photos and statuses to keep our followers generally up-to-date and interested in our project. When I was giving feedback on the poster, I didn't think the comic strip was suitable as it was difficult to see the photos behind the characters. It also look the focus off the characters which was not what we wanted for a promotional poster. Nevertheless, I came up with the idea of using the comic strip photos for a spoiler without context post. These posts give off spoilers but without any context so the viewers don't understand them until they've seen the film. This works well with this photo collage because if you don't know the story of VET-MAN then it would be difficult to understand what an owl, Tim with drugs, Tim with a mask and hoodie, the vet van, Tess and Sheila all mean. Once the viewers see the film, the individual photos will start to make sense.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-yQEpI06wOdc/XM8BZIN6oiI/AAAAAAAAD14/-LnVMw_PNh8SQRW3jY0y71zfRW9zcV82wCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B16.29.04.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="942" data-original-width="1266" height="476" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-yQEpI06wOdc/XM8BZIN6oiI/AAAAAAAAD14/-LnVMw_PNh8SQRW3jY0y71zfRW9zcV82wCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B16.29.04.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-OGVJ7zNdjFI/XNHjdI4L8XI/AAAAAAAAD68/VqIpwZXL-x4SKWuWCMNAlnbAEeUpi4uvgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B20.58.09.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="941" data-original-width="1338" height="448" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-OGVJ7zNdjFI/XNHjdI4L8XI/AAAAAAAAD68/VqIpwZXL-x4SKWuWCMNAlnbAEeUpi4uvgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B20.58.09.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">My priority with the social media was to keep the posts light-hearted to reflect the tone of the film, this can be shown by the captions I chose in the two screenshots above. I kept all the photos on the social media accounts as natural as I could to fit in with&nbsp;the tone of the film. We shot the film with natural light and I wanted to bring across the naturalness in the social media. It&nbsp;wouldn't be&nbsp;appropriate to post a lot of graphics as they&nbsp;wouldn't represent the tone of the film well.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The content above is scheduled to post on both Instagram and Facebook in order to gain two different audiences. As I found in my previous research from pre-production, I will target the younger half of our target age range on Instagram, while targeting the older half of our target age range on Facebook. As a result of this, I felt it was necessary to post on both social media accounts.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I have decided to use Twitter mainly for research, for example, I found The Laughing Mirror Theatre on the platform, however, I have been continuing with Tim's personal Twitter account that I created in the pre-production stage. I wasn't confident that this marketing method would be effective until Oscar suggested creating an account in a character's perspective and I explained that I had already started it. I struggled with Tim's Twitter account in the previous unit as we didn't have a lot of content that I was able to use on the platform. However, now we have captured our footage and gained promo photos, I have been able to personalise the Twitter to him. This is essential if I want the account to look like his personal page. I started by changing the profile picture to one of him with an owl. This adds to the authenticity of him being a vet, I also changed the cover photo to the van as if it is his pride and joy.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jNZIVqJYYM0/XNHr-wmmr1I/AAAAAAAAD7Q/U9HbS_fZ3cwxi0ucZSTVe1rZcEplg7tQwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B21.34.38.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="934" data-original-width="1324" height="450" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jNZIVqJYYM0/XNHr-wmmr1I/AAAAAAAAD7Q/U9HbS_fZ3cwxi0ucZSTVe1rZcEplg7tQwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B21.34.38.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim's Twitter page</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I tweeted, re-tweeted&nbsp;and followed accounts to try and make the page as&nbsp;believable as I could. I kept it all&nbsp;relevant to animals, apart from the odd tweet about football. I thought it would be amusing to hear about his&nbsp;animal experiences and then a random football tweet&nbsp;appears. My aim for the Twitter page is to keep it as comedic and light-hearted as I can in order to help bring the tone across of our film. I enjoyed writing these because of the light-heartedness, it was amusing to think of odd things to write about.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-4dSLxFpOsxw/XNPhReuhwRI/AAAAAAAAD9A/H3q3LJJlYHEmDM7DD9zt6-cPNu0VYuGVwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B09.13.27.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1040" data-original-width="1554" height="428" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-4dSLxFpOsxw/XNPhReuhwRI/AAAAAAAAD9A/H3q3LJJlYHEmDM7DD9zt6-cPNu0VYuGVwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B09.13.27.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim's Twitter page</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Screen grabs of VET-MAN's Instagram page:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-rz2S1dSILWc/XNSlRwAC1zI/AAAAAAAAD-M/UbuWvZ5g3hk10kayftA83q-5EPIRqPISQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B23.08.48.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="971" data-original-width="1600" height="388" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-rz2S1dSILWc/XNSlRwAC1zI/AAAAAAAAD-M/UbuWvZ5g3hk10kayftA83q-5EPIRqPISQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B23.08.48.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RvQ3Qy2oXuU/XNSlXU6iUaI/AAAAAAAAD-Q/yZ4GMi1IOmEk3TSj1VGcebD-jxpRrVh8QCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B23.09.03.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1035" data-original-width="1600" height="414" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RvQ3Qy2oXuU/XNSlXU6iUaI/AAAAAAAAD-Q/yZ4GMi1IOmEk3TSj1VGcebD-jxpRrVh8QCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B23.09.03.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Screen grabs of VET-MAN's Facebook page:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-m4fiW8IGJ14/XNSmCG0ATLI/AAAAAAAAD-c/ywAUXRXOXJc6kHhwKnmbAqlLf_387HaTACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B23.11.50.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="745" data-original-width="1600" height="298" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-m4fiW8IGJ14/XNSmCG0ATLI/AAAAAAAAD-c/ywAUXRXOXJc6kHhwKnmbAqlLf_387HaTACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B23.11.50.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vEuRkUx912c/XNSmDeqMLQI/AAAAAAAAD-g/Dtl846jWoXQMxWxw47BhfAAyRgqrzXHsACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B23.12.20.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="772" data-original-width="1600" height="308" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vEuRkUx912c/XNSmDeqMLQI/AAAAAAAAD-g/Dtl846jWoXQMxWxw47BhfAAyRgqrzXHsACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B23.12.20.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Poster</b></span><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-I5CV0MK_DXI/XM7-V3tPHJI/AAAAAAAAD1k/1UZ0bIE-fUsNc73tArhcA0VLqe9Fq72gwCLcBGAs/s1600/VERT%2BPOSTER%2B5.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="1132" height="400" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-I5CV0MK_DXI/XM7-V3tPHJI/AAAAAAAAD1k/1UZ0bIE-fUsNc73tArhcA0VLqe9Fq72gwCLcBGAs/s400/VERT%2BPOSTER%2B5.jpg" width="281" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">VET-MAN poster</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I have&nbsp;previously&nbsp;described the stages the&nbsp;poster went through before getting to the final one. However, sharing the&nbsp;poster with our followers is another marketing technique.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I wanted to find out how posters can be an effective marketing tool and I found out that we need to get peoples&nbsp;attention with the poster as this will bring in new viewers / followers, it is&nbsp;essential to "</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">ensure that your designs are alluring, but simple.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Don't use too many fonts or colours in one design"&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">(PrintPlace, n/d). Alex did a good job with this as I believe the colours and positioning of the characters are alluring / interesting, he also didn't use too many fonts as the main text is the title, and the secondary text is the movie credits at the bottom of the poster. I also found out to make sure that the "company's colours and logo are captured within your poster design, but don't overdo it. Too much</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;could take away from the company's message" (PrintPlace, n/d).&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">There are a couple of colours in the poster but not too many, the main colours being red, grey, white and dark blue. I believe these colours all complement each other and bring across our branding well. The previous poster&nbsp;example with&nbsp;the blood splatter across the background may have been too much and taken the focus off the&nbsp;characters as I explained on the development of the poster, and therefore, it may have&nbsp;taken away from the message of the film.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">While Alex created the poster, I had the chance to give advice and feedback to&nbsp;make sure the poster was bright and bold and matched the rest of our social media pages. It was inevitable that the colour red was going to be involved somewhere in the poster as this is our main colour throughout the project. However, we knew the colour&nbsp;shouldn't cover too much of the poster and make it overbearing for our followers. Throughout the project, we have&nbsp;only featured a small&nbsp;amount of the colour and&nbsp;combined it with whites, greys and black, keeping it subtle.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I also made sure that the poster was created with our&nbsp;social media&nbsp;platforms in mind to keep it matching the rest of our content. The poster has a natural feel to it with the photos of Tim and Luke, instead of making it as one large graphic. The&nbsp;natural feel relates to our filming style and promo photos, and therefore, the look of the social media pages.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span> <br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>A different approach to marketing&nbsp;</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After establishing the channel that VET-MAN suits the most, I decided to look into their adverts to see how they market their television shows, with the hope of some inspiration of different ways to promote VET-MAN to our audience. I first looked into Channel 4 adverts to see their layout, I already imagined that the logo would be a prominent part of the advert, which it is looking at the two adverts below. I have also noticed along with the logo, the only thing that is written on the advert is the television show name, genre, time and date. Another thing that stood out were the colours. The colours match between the writing and logo. The orange in the advert below stands out more than the blue. Although the blue writing and logo don't stand out as much, another colour may not have suited the advert. I will aim to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">make mine stand out in a similar way as the first advert,&nbsp;however, I will make sure I pick a colour that&nbsp;represents the film.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-WfQOlYc9fe4/XM2JVYbK0DI/AAAAAAAADw0/zwBClynP_0gzMko09HL7sSxpbCcqwZdiQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-04%2Bat%2B13.19.22.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="548" data-original-width="1434" height="244" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-WfQOlYc9fe4/XM2JVYbK0DI/AAAAAAAADw0/zwBClynP_0gzMko09HL7sSxpbCcqwZdiQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-04%2Bat%2B13.19.22.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Hm41fyEmdsE/XM2JVMJERMI/AAAAAAAADww/pTFfdcdjIesl4cS9USDeL4miUI4-vACEQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-04%2Bat%2B13.19.34.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="400" data-original-width="990" height="258" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Hm41fyEmdsE/XM2JVMJERMI/AAAAAAAADww/pTFfdcdjIesl4cS9USDeL4miUI4-vACEQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-04%2Bat%2B13.19.34.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Channel 4 advertising examples</span>&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After looking into the advertising examples above, I decided to create my own. I picked a shoot photo which we took with the aim of it becoming a promo photo. I picked the larger photo below out from the other's below as it was positioned nicely. There is an even amount of background and characters / van, whereas the first photo below had too much background. I believe that the positions the characters are standing in give off their personalities well. Tim looks authoritative and like someone you'd look up to, and Luke's smile looks quite innocent, as if he's excited and doesn't realise whats about to come. Similarly to the poster, this suits the characters and the tone of the film.</span><br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ch6NX3KR-eM/XM2gGlrdKMI/AAAAAAAADyU/MePy19WxzbkhWwbNNuUQD2sMbsHDXIuAACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-04%2Bat%2B15.21.32.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="282" data-original-width="1600" height="112" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ch6NX3KR-eM/XM2gGlrdKMI/AAAAAAAADyU/MePy19WxzbkhWwbNNuUQD2sMbsHDXIuAACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-04%2Bat%2B15.21.32.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Other potential promo photos</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I previously pointed out the colours that the television adverts used. They matched between&nbsp;the&nbsp;writing on the advert&nbsp;and the Channel 4 logo. Again, I replicated this and created red box with the white writing inside saying 'VET-MAN. Brand New Sitcom - Starts Thurs 30 May 10pm'. I put that specific date&nbsp;because that's the day Alex wants to release the film - one week after the screening. In addition to this, as VET-MAN is a dark comedy it needs to be on after the watershed at 9pm, and looking at the Channel 4 TV guide, this is the time&nbsp;in which some of their comedies air. To go with the&nbsp;writing I created a red&nbsp;coloured Channel 4 logo. I&nbsp;positioned the logo and writing at the bottom of the photo&nbsp;because if it was at the top it simply&nbsp;wouldn't fit, it would cover the characters faces. I also&nbsp;purposely covered the VET-MAN writing on the van&nbsp;because I didn't want a repeat of the word on the advert as it's featured in the advert writing.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I tried to position the red 4 logo in&nbsp;different places&nbsp;around the photo but it looked best in the bottom left hand corner. When it was on the right side against the side of the van, there was too much going on and the red&nbsp;colour didn't stand out as well. It stands out&nbsp;nicely in front of the dark background. Ultimately the white logo looked the best, however, to comply with Channel 4's advertising I had to make the logo match the writing. I chose red as it has been the main colour throughout our branding, from initial presentations,&nbsp;through to the final poster. However, the red we have been using is a brighter shade but to match the writing on the advert I had to change the red slightly to a softer shade. Nevertheless, the red is still significant in the progression of VET-MAN.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-REZ_ohfbJIo/XM2meXFTK4I/AAAAAAAADys/rODWm4e8UXkjlcyjx84mUQfC1m8NAzn1wCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-04%2Bat%2B15.49.02.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="272" data-original-width="1600" height="108" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-REZ_ohfbJIo/XM2meXFTK4I/AAAAAAAADys/rODWm4e8UXkjlcyjx84mUQfC1m8NAzn1wCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-04%2Bat%2B15.49.02.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Our main colour shown throughout the project</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Below is the final Channel 4 advert I created for VET-MAN. I researched into the Channel 4 font and as it is bespoke I couldn't find a template anywhere. As a result of this, I had to find a font that was similar to it - 'veranda'. I believe that my Channel 4 advert looks quite effective and it looks like something that could be on the channel. I have followed the guidelines of the other Channel 4 adverts and I think that the bold colour match helps the advert stand out. Ideally, the shade of red in the 'VM' on the van would match the logo and writing so the shades matched throughout the advert. However, the photo made the red 'V' have a lighter shade to what it was in person. I didn't</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;think this shade&nbsp;represented the film well. As it can be seen above the red we have been using throughout the project is darker and bolder than this. Instead, I matched the writing and the logo and&nbsp;didn't match the 'V'. Nevertheless, as&nbsp;shown in the above adverts, the main feature of the advert is that the logo and writing match which is what I&nbsp;made priority when creating the VET-MAN advert.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qkvi_ay6EXY/XM71cdaki5I/AAAAAAAAD0k/pxhJ7KKv2loKB_dPneGUVOqovQLLTiz5gCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B15.35.36.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="694" data-original-width="1132" height="392" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qkvi_ay6EXY/XM71cdaki5I/AAAAAAAAD0k/pxhJ7KKv2loKB_dPneGUVOqovQLLTiz5gCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B15.35.36.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">VET-MAN Channel 4 advert</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I watched Channel 4 live online to get a better understanding of their adverts and how they promote their television shows. Although the new shows coming out now aren't the same genre as VET-MAN, their adverts will be the same. The sitcoms I previously researched into such as </span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Peep Show, Frasier </i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">and </span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Everyone Loves Raymond </i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">are older sitcoms that shown on the channel, so as a result of this, I based my marketing on the programmes that are coming out now on Channel 4. On the other hand, this is reasonable as VET-MAN hypothetically is a new show coming to the channel, so it makes sense to replicate their advertising on a brand new show.&nbsp;</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The first one I saw was advertising for <i>Location, Location, Location. </i>This was a new series starting soon on Channel 4. Throughout my research into Channel 4's marketing, their branding all follows a pattern. Their branding is made up of blocks with straight lines. The red 4 logo above is their current logo and that is made up of red and transparent blocks and lines. Again with the red and white writing, I noticed that the advert writing is usually in a box with straight lines. Thinking back to the <i>Location, Location, Location </i>advert, the time, date and name of the show is written in the white blocks. I replicated this for VET-MAN as shown below. I kept to the branding of Channel 4 while changing the time, date and name. I also changed 'New Series' to 'New Show' as we aren't creating a series, only the one episode. I thought this looked really effective and as if it could be on Channel 4. This method with the while blocks would appear at the end of the trailer or extract of the film.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-dAFkJcpsRj8/XM71pf7sFZI/AAAAAAAAD0o/M3pKwPs4SDIXeyEwke7Mzzs5JSlyv_9vQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B15.36.57.png" imageanchor="1"><img border="0" data-original-height="660" data-original-width="1530" height="276" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-dAFkJcpsRj8/XM71pf7sFZI/AAAAAAAAD0o/M3pKwPs4SDIXeyEwke7Mzzs5JSlyv_9vQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B15.36.57.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Next, I saw another couple of adverts that were more focused on the colour of the advert. They&nbsp;didn't have a clip or still of the film&nbsp;underneath the&nbsp;advertisement, just a coloured background. Both adverts below had an animation to them but the&nbsp;animation became still once the text came onto the screen.&nbsp;Again, these are advertising brand new shows starting on Channel 4 so I felt it was necessary to&nbsp;replicate their branding and marketing technique for VET-MAN.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I started by creating a variety of 3D rectangles of different sizes, some with a pointed edge and some with a flat edge and scattered them accordingly to the advert for <i>D-Day</i>&nbsp;(below). I tried to match them as best as I could to make a suitable replica. Once I had set the look of the&nbsp;advert&nbsp;similar to Channel 4, I had to personalise it to VET-MAN. I decided to change the coloured blocks to the same shade of red&nbsp;that I used for the first advert I created (matching the shade of red from the writing to the logo). By doing this I am keeping our colour scheme throughout VET-MAN's marketing. In the original&nbsp;advert, the show was&nbsp;sponsored by a make of car. I replicated this by having the sponsored section but put the UCA logo to&nbsp;show that we are sponsored by the&nbsp;University. I think this&nbsp;looked effective and authentic as if it could be shown on Channel 4. Again, I promoted the show to start at 10.00pm so it is&nbsp;after the watershed. However, the advert for it would be clean so this could be shown at any point throughout the day.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-orb_bBMY_IU/XNFgRG1ikeI/AAAAAAAAD5Q/tlu8Hidjz4Ul6GqdmjdoJbx19TvngPI6gCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B11.38.19.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="478" data-original-width="1600" height="190" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-orb_bBMY_IU/XNFgRG1ikeI/AAAAAAAAD5Q/tlu8Hidjz4Ul6GqdmjdoJbx19TvngPI6gCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B11.38.19.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The next few adverts I saw were similar to the <i>D-Day</i>&nbsp;one above, but the animation just finished in a different position on the screen. I also noticed how Channel 4 uses their colours. The advert for <i>First Dates </i>had a pop of colour to reflect the tone of the show. Using the teal and pink colours together made me think of fun, excitement and adventure which is what <i>First Dates </i>is about. The synopsis for the show on IMDb is described as a 'dating show with a twist that takes advantage of modern forms of dating'. The colours they have used in the advert for <i>First Dates </i>would usually clash, so it can be said that they've taken a twist on standard colour rules and emphasised the modernness of the show. The next advert I saw was for <i>Chimerica </i>which is a completely different genre to <i>First Dates. </i>Although it is obvious that these are completely different shows, the tone of the show can be&nbsp;seen from the colour choices alone.&nbsp;<i>Chimerica&nbsp;</i>is a drama with the IMDb synopsis describing the show with the word 'mysterious'. As I said previously, the different tone of these two brand new shows are represented by the colour palette in their adverts. I described&nbsp;<i>First Dates </i>colour palette as fun, exciting and adventurous, however, I could describe <i>Chimerica</i>'s black and grey coloured palette as dark and mysterious. From this I have learnt that the audience can learn a lot from just the colour palette of an advert.&nbsp;</span></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BAe_2rO7lpU/XNFjuJfJBAI/AAAAAAAAD5c/Ez0Sd02Akogl5JGeJBw8dL8QHmVcfSjVwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B11.43.18.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="506" data-original-width="1600" height="202" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BAe_2rO7lpU/XNFjuJfJBAI/AAAAAAAAD5c/Ez0Sd02Akogl5JGeJBw8dL8QHmVcfSjVwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B11.43.18.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I wanted to replicate the tone of VET-MAN into my advert for Channel 4. After looking at the adverts above, I have learnt how important the colour palette is. VET-MAN is essentially a dark comedy so I could go two ways in the colour palette of the advert. I could either go bright and cheerful to represent the comedy aspect to the film, similarly to the way I've been posting on the social media, or I could bring out the darkness of the film by using a darker colour palette.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I&nbsp;decided to create both. I started with brighter colours&nbsp;that&nbsp;usually&nbsp;wouldn't&nbsp;be put&nbsp;together,&nbsp;inspired by <i>First Dates.</i>&nbsp;I&nbsp;decided to go for a bright blue and a slightly duller shade of red.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the previous advert, I created red blocks but I put these on a light blue background.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I think they represent the comedic tone of VET-MAN</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;well. To me, the red and the blue signify superhero colours. As we wanted to give off a superhero look to the poster, I think these colours are suitable for the VET-MAN&nbsp;advert. I kept to the same day and time for&nbsp;the film to be shown - Thursday 10.00pm, as we are releasing the&nbsp;film on a Thursday (30th May).&nbsp;Hypothetically, this advert would appear on the week leading up to the release date (week&nbsp;commencing Monday 27th).&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Subsequently, I created another advert but with a slightly darker&nbsp;colour&nbsp;palette. I&nbsp;wanted to&nbsp;include the&nbsp;colour red as this is the main colour in our branding throughout the whole project, but this time I made the background red rather&nbsp;than the blocks. I brought the brightness of the red down&nbsp;compared with the red on the blue advert to keep with the dark tone. I then made the blocks into a shade of grey as this colour is also quite prominent in our colour palette as shown in our poster. The colour of the text was next. The black in the blue advert suited well,&nbsp;however, the black text on the red advert looked a bit too dark as it wasn't clear to see. As a&nbsp;result of this, I decided to use white so the text was clear.&nbsp;However, I&nbsp;didn't use a bright white as we want a dark tone to the advert, I used a darker shade of white / light shade of grey so it&nbsp;didn't look too different to the&nbsp;general look of the poster. I was inspired by this from <i>Chimerica's </i>advert as they also use white text, but it's not a bright white, it's more of an off white in keeping with the&nbsp;general dark tone of the advert. I&nbsp;believe that both adverts look effective and&nbsp;authentic. I&nbsp;think they both also give off the&nbsp;different tones&nbsp;that the film could be&nbsp;perceived by - comedic and dark.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-BP430FWCLMk/XNFpF2jEt4I/AAAAAAAAD5o/q25XNF94B9clDZ7F00SQPVgUpUYnDE73QCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B11.48.15.png" imageanchor="1"><img border="0" data-original-height="530" data-original-width="1600" height="212" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-BP430FWCLMk/XNFpF2jEt4I/AAAAAAAAD5o/q25XNF94B9clDZ7F00SQPVgUpUYnDE73QCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B11.48.15.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As well as advertising on television, Channel 4 have their own catch up service online. I decided to try our advert on there as this&nbsp;required the promo photo to be in a different format. These adverts are still&nbsp;landscape, however, a lot smaller in size as they are advertising more programmes than just the one on the computer screen.&nbsp;Throughout my&nbsp;advertising examples I have kept the same photo of&nbsp;both Tim&nbsp;and Luke in&nbsp;front of the van. This is&nbsp;because the&nbsp;adverts I have been manipulating are the same layout, just different sizes. If I came across a marketing technique on the channel&nbsp;that required a portrait photo, I would change the&nbsp;promo photo to a close up of one of the characters.&nbsp;However, I have not&nbsp;needed to do this.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To create the two adverts below for the catch up service, I inserted our promo photo and found a font most&nbsp;similar to the Channel 4 font already on the screen. As I said previously, the font is bespoke and therefore,&nbsp;not&nbsp;available for me to download. As a&nbsp;result of this, I found the font 'Trebuchet' which looked the most authentic for&nbsp;something on the Channel 4 catch up website. This was a simple advert to&nbsp;make and I believe it the look of the chosen promo photo looks really effective on the screen, it has a realistic feel to it due to our natural shooting techniques during filming. I&nbsp;believe this looks&nbsp;authentic&nbsp;next to the <i>Hollyoaks </i>advert as this show also has a natural aesthetic to it.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VjkybWs9D3E/XNHiCy_81RI/AAAAAAAAD6w/-xxAczgYWNMFd0YLnJuKHlIqnVdA8LTkQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B20.52.10.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="931" data-original-width="1250" height="476" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VjkybWs9D3E/XNHiCy_81RI/AAAAAAAAD6w/-xxAczgYWNMFd0YLnJuKHlIqnVdA8LTkQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B20.52.10.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">VET-MAN advert on Channel 4's catch up service - 4oD</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Street marketing</b></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9YzBrJTP0to/XNNdfIw8xOI/AAAAAAAAD80/WnIdz7y75dM-bdUFJDu7lGdSE7iCL5zhACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-08%2Bat%2B16.36.14.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><br /></a><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9YzBrJTP0to/XNNdfIw8xOI/AAAAAAAAD80/WnIdz7y75dM-bdUFJDu7lGdSE7iCL5zhACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-08%2Bat%2B16.36.14.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1032" data-original-width="1002" height="320" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9YzBrJTP0to/XNNdfIw8xOI/AAAAAAAAD80/WnIdz7y75dM-bdUFJDu7lGdSE7iCL5zhACLcBGAs/s320/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-08%2Bat%2B16.36.14.png" width="310" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I was advised by Emily to advertise VET-MAN with street marketing, for example, printing images / illustrations onto lamp posts or coffee cups, hiring out a room and projecting bits of&nbsp;the film on the wall. These were all well thought through and creative ideas but unfortunately due to our small budget, I wouldn't have been able to do the projections or hiring any spaces for exhibitions. As a result of this, I decided to try the more cost-effective marketing method that she suggested, such as printing an illustration onto a sticker and sticking it in locations that are popular with our target audience.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Emily offered to create some illustrations for us so I set her up with that.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">She suggested getting some adhesive paper to print the illustrations out on so I can easily create the stickers to help advertise VET-MAN in other ways than social media. She explained that she was going to put our main&nbsp;hashtag on the illustrations and&nbsp;then ideally, the public will go to our&nbsp;hashtag and then find our Instagram account. Once they find this, it'll be easy to find the Facebook account and keep up-to-date with our film. After a few weeks she had created a couple of illustrations for me to print out. I can also post these on social&nbsp;media if I wanted. Below are the illustrations she made. I&nbsp;advised her on a couple of things but apart from that I let her create what she wanted. I sent her the&nbsp;story synopsis so she had an idea of what happens in the film, I sent over the poster so she could see our colour scheme and I explained that our main colour was red. As she suggested, she included the #vetman so if any members of public were to look up the&nbsp;hashtag they&nbsp;should come across our Instagram, and subsequently the rest of our&nbsp;social media posts and platforms.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RcEPOvkdwFs/XM75ZLTuYCI/AAAAAAAAD1Q/FmJWkgu5pfEJYZY_j_a9-8tqrBw_Up63QCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B15.54.47.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="630" data-original-width="880" height="286" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RcEPOvkdwFs/XM75ZLTuYCI/AAAAAAAAD1Q/FmJWkgu5pfEJYZY_j_a9-8tqrBw_Up63QCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B15.54.47.png" width="400" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-h8V2GfC1_zo/XM75ZjLOEZI/AAAAAAAAD1U/D7lm5H_beJM78fj5-3NdBrHuQVZbeHs6gCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B15.54.55.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="462" data-original-width="874" height="210" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-h8V2GfC1_zo/XM75ZjLOEZI/AAAAAAAAD1U/D7lm5H_beJM78fj5-3NdBrHuQVZbeHs6gCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-05%2Bat%2B15.54.55.png" width="400" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">When I received these illustrations back from her, I was impressed. I thought they looked really effective and&nbsp;the&nbsp;shade of red gives a good pop of colour. The red and black can also&nbsp;represent the dark comedy side to the film. I went back to Emily with&nbsp;this and asked if she thought I should put some&nbsp;more information with them for&nbsp;people to read, but she said the idea of these is so they just have the&nbsp;hashtag and then people will find out more information about the film once they find the&nbsp;hashtag on&nbsp;social media. Emily&nbsp;next&nbsp;suggested&nbsp;finding different locations in which to place the&nbsp;stickers, she advised&nbsp;something metal such as a lamp post but she said to be as creative as I can. I started thinking of places that are&nbsp;popular for 16-30 year olds to visit. I placed these stickers in a&nbsp;variety of different places, such as my local high street, a shopping&nbsp;centre and on some clothing recycling bins. I felt that anywhere to do with fashion&nbsp;would be popular with younger people,&nbsp;especially at the weekend. I also placed some stickers on bins at the beach, as we had a spout of good weather at the time I was looking for creative locations. I also placed them outside my&nbsp;local cinema and down one of the main high streets where younger people like to go in the evenings. I found a couple of lamp posts and bins that already had some stickers on them so I added mine to it.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Some of my locations are shown in the photos below:</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-w3z7rZdY3Ew/XNNNtG7IIJI/AAAAAAAAD8g/HcBChY0GcqI1WE7hYZNmXwMvLB-7O5hyQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-08%2Bat%2B22.38.38.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="768" data-original-width="1236" height="396" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-w3z7rZdY3Ew/XNNNtG7IIJI/AAAAAAAAD8g/HcBChY0GcqI1WE7hYZNmXwMvLB-7O5hyQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-08%2Bat%2B22.38.38.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Recycling bin &amp; high street</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">I posted a variety down the high street, at the&nbsp;promenade along the beach and at the shopping centre, rather than just one or two. I feel that these&nbsp;will&nbsp;appeal to more people if&nbsp;they see them&nbsp;scattered in the area.&nbsp;They may ignore the first one or two but may become interested in what the sticker is about after realising&nbsp;they're scattered everywhere.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">I wasn't sure whether this would work or not but some time after I distributed the stickers we had additional followers on our Instagram page. In the end we had a total of 164 followers when before this we had about 30. Subsequently, we had more comments and more people&nbsp;found the Facebook page. This has proved that this marketing technique&nbsp;works, the stickers are small but&nbsp;effective.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-cABCJrf-QrI/XNNNzvCiqTI/AAAAAAAAD8k/OMsP_Zw9yYAAkPmQZVEyk4D-2ukfBv9YACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-08%2Bat%2B22.43.24.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="614" data-original-width="1296" height="302" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-cABCJrf-QrI/XNNNzvCiqTI/AAAAAAAAD8k/OMsP_Zw9yYAAkPmQZVEyk4D-2ukfBv9YACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-08%2Bat%2B22.43.24.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shopping centre &amp; high street</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The marketing schedule helped me see where I was stronger in posting on the social media and where I was weaker. I believe I was able to make up for lost time on the social media because during the post-production stage I was able to put all my focus on marketing VET-MAN. My posts were spread out over the course of the whole project which helped gain followers, as I was posting every now and then rather than over indulging on the pages and annoying followers.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I believe I brought the tone of the film across well in my social media posts. I wanted to keep the posts light hearted to reflect the comedy aspect of the film. This was initially suggested by Oscar and something that I hadn't thought of prior to contacting him.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-&nbsp;Surprisingly, the&nbsp;stickers worked and we&nbsp;gained many new followers on our social media page. I have learnt about the impact other methods of marketing have on our target audience, rather than just relying on social media alone.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>References:</i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif; text-align: center;"><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">StudioBinder. (2019).&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">What Does a Producer Do: The Various Types of Producers in Film &amp; TV.</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">&nbsp;Available: https://www.studiobinder.com/blog/what-does-a-producer-do/. Last accessed 24th April 2019.</span></span></i><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>-&nbsp;PrintPlace. (n/d).&nbsp;Market with posters to reach potential customers in many different locations..&nbsp;Available: https://www.printplace.com/articles/a-successful-poster-marketing-campaign. Last accessed 25th April 2019.</i></span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-46806311436949468652019-04-24T15:08:00.000+01:002019-05-13T13:38:19.115+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Development of Fine Cut & Poster<b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">DEVELOPMENT OF FINE CUT</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As part of the feedback from Beth, she suggested getting someone from outside the production to watch the film to see if they think any scenes&nbsp;don't add anything comedic to the film. This will be a good way to decide what needs to be cut down in&nbsp;order to make the film snappier, and therefore, funnier. As it was a case of refining the footage now, I felt that it was a good time to pass the edit onto Katie. She hasn't been looking at the edit as much as I have and therefore, will have a fresh mind when looking at it. She will be able to refine the film and remove parts that don't add anything comedic to the story. In addition to this,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I am confident that I have done as&nbsp;much as I can with ordering the footage and making it resemble the final product. As I found in my&nbsp;research, this is as far as the rough cut goes. Once it starts to&nbsp;resemble the final film it is time to focus on the audio, sound effects and colour which means it is now in the fine cut stage. Although the film has now been passed on, I will still be involved with the fine cut by scheduling viewings with Katie. Similarly to the shoot days, I need to make sure the initial vision of the film is being realised. We shot the film similar to our original plans which was ideal, but as we are progressing further into the post-production stage, I need to make sure the film still holds our initial vision.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Fine cut 1</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/j3xabLUHWPU" width="560"></iframe><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After Katie had the edit for a week, I had a viewing with her. She said that she felt the footage was all in the right places, and she only changed a few minor shots&nbsp;that she thought fit better. This was completely fine with me as I had been staring at the edit for over a month, and it needed a fresh mind&nbsp;looking at it. As the&nbsp;footage was pretty much in the correct order, Katie went onto fixing the audio&nbsp;and importing sound effects. I left the sound effects out as I concentrated purely on the footage, so it was good to see the film with more character in it with the added effects. I added in all the audio / sounds (e.g. the vase breaking, some of the owl screeches) that we had recorded but we agreed that finding the sound effects online was a part of the fine cut.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The sound effects&nbsp;needed were:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The printing sound</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The additional owl screeches</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Flapping sounds / wind, air</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Thud's when they hit the dog, when Luke drops the dog at&nbsp;Sheila's doorstep</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Dog cry when they hit the dog</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Gameboy noises</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">My feedback to fine cut 1:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The sound effects listed above add to the story really well. The printer sound really brings together the first scene which is good.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Audio is a bit pitchy in scenes 7 and 9.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The owl&nbsp;screeches really add to the idea of the owl being&nbsp;distressed and get&nbsp;the point&nbsp;of the scene across well.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Katie had tweaked&nbsp;the owl punch and it looked a lot better to when I had it. I knew passing it to Katie at this point</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;would be beneficial so she could look&nbsp;at it with a fresh mind.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Game boy noises still to do.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-&nbsp;The edit is really improving and I am liking it a lot more with the sound effects included.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I have finished my job as editor, I started to view the footage with a producer's mindset. The producer "oversee[s] post-production from editing, through music composition and picture lock" (StudioBinder, 2019). I was creating the rough cut previously, so I was involved with the picture lock because I was deciding what order the footage went in. I understand Katie will change some of the footage around if she thinks it'll look better elsewhere. However, she will inform me when she changes the footage so I can oversee it and give my feedback. From this piece of research, I have established that I will oversee each aspect of the fine cut, as I did for the rough cut. Music, audio, sound effects and colour will be down to me in the end. Once Katie has applied it to the film I can give my feedback and request it to be changed if I think it needs to be.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During this time period, the producer may also "market the project and generate a buzz for the project by working with a PR team" (StudioBinder, 2019). I have started the&nbsp;marketing process for VET-MAN, however now I have the opportunity to take this further as I will no longer be in full control of the edit. As we are a small&nbsp;production group, we&nbsp;don't have a PR team like a large-budget film&nbsp;would&nbsp;have. However, I have&nbsp;commissioned Emily, an illustration artist, to help create pieces to help market the film.&nbsp;Therefore, I can still take on this research into the final stages of the film by getting her more involved with the marketing side of VET-MAN.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In further research I&nbsp;found&nbsp;that even if the shooting has finished, the producers can still demand that additional scenes be&nbsp;filmed. As I have been creating the rough cut and believe that we have got all the successful shots required for our film, it will be&nbsp;unlikely that I will want to re-shoot additional&nbsp;footage in the fine cut stage,&nbsp;however, this was interesting to keep in mind. I believe I will continue my marketing of VET-MAN while keeping track of&nbsp;the fine cut. I will schedule viewings with Katie to see how the film is developing and give feedback where it is necessary.</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the fine cut, Katie had started to&nbsp;work on the audio issues during scene 7 &amp; 9 when Tim and Luke arrive at the Owl Academy for the first time. We filmed right next to a river, which we didn't notice when we visited the owl academy for previous test shoots. The wind through the trees&nbsp;didn't&nbsp;help either, as a result of this, we needed a bit of sound work done on these scenes. Katie attempted to&nbsp;fix the unwanted background noise, however she&nbsp;found this difficult as the more she decreased the background noise, the more robotic the characters voices sounded.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To work around this, Katie came up with the idea of putting in a shot of the river to first establish the&nbsp;noisy background before we see the characters getting out of the van. As a result of this, Katie will be able to slightly adjust the&nbsp;background noise but she&nbsp;won't need to take it out&nbsp;completely&nbsp;because we have established the idea of a river&nbsp;behind the characters. We had planned to conduct an ADR day. We initially were going to do this on the voiceover day, however Alex and I&nbsp;realised how much practice and preparation we would need beforehand. This was no problem as I spoke to Ferg about&nbsp;sitting with him a couple of times to learn the basics of ADR, as the&nbsp;rough cut editor. Once Katie realised changing the&nbsp;audio in scene 7 &amp; 9 makes the characters voices robotic, I brought up the ADR day again. Up until this point, Katie and Alex both communicated that the audio issue was being solved, however, I&nbsp;didn't realise that they were struggling with this. As I said previously, I brought up the ADR day again but both Katie and Alex&nbsp;weren't keen on doing this. Admittedly, we are running low on the budget that we have already added to so I understand their hesitation to hold off on the ADR day, however, if it's going to bring the quality of the film up, I was interested to try it.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to our differences, the decision was made to not conduct an ADR day, I left the edit with Katie to continue improving the audio as much as she could, particularly in scene 7 &amp; 9 and I would review it again in the next few days.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On the other hand, to support our decision to not conduct the ADR day, in my research with Randy Thom, he advised that "</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">in the end directors almost always prefer the production sound, even if it's&nbsp;noisy and distorted" (Thom, n/d). ADR can sometimes sound too clean, which is what I experienced from replacing the&nbsp;dialogue for scene 11 (when Tim and Luke enter the academy before owl punch). Even if we conducted the ADR properly, I&nbsp;wouldn't have been confident in using it for a whole scene incase we struggled to get it to sound natural with some added atmos.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Fine cut 2</b></span><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b> <iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/76zobfas5eM" width="560"></iframe>&nbsp; <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Katie's method of editing is slightly different to mine. She&nbsp;prefers to do a lot to the edit and then show us. As a result of this, I left it a week from the previous viewing until I saw it again. At this viewing, Katie had progressed really well. The colour correcting was nearly finished and it looked a lot bett</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">er to when I had the edit. During the rough cut the footage was very yellow in the first scene, however, now it&nbsp;looks more natural.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Main points from fine cut:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Colour grade is nearly completed&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Audio is almost done</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">My feedback:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Audio when Luke runs back to van</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The&nbsp;audio when Luke runs back to the van after visiting Sheila&nbsp;didn't quite match the rest of the film. The&nbsp;volume of this needs increasing.</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Titles could go after “I’m VET-MAN” then continue with him running out of the room</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We need to establish where we want the titles to be. Alex suggested having them after Tim's line "I'm VET-MAN". I think the titles&nbsp;would be&nbsp;suitable there as we've basically introduced the title and idea of the film with that line of dialogue. I&nbsp;don't&nbsp;think the titles would be as suitable anywhere else. Once we finish&nbsp;with the titles, we can cut back to the scene when Tim knocks the vase off and runs out the room.&nbsp;</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Owl noises echo slightly</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The additional owl noises in the owl punch scene sound slightly echoed. It doesn't&nbsp;quite match&nbsp;the&nbsp;location of the scene as we are outside at this point in the story, and you&nbsp;wouldn't hear many echoes&nbsp;outside. This may need a re-think to see if there are any other owl effects that sound more appropriate for the outside location.</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Possibly cut dialogue when Tim walks around the van in scene 13. The audio dips and sounds different to the rest of the audio.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">One of Tim's final lines in the film is when he walks round the back of the van to get in it in scene 13. As we had the boom on the left side of&nbsp;the van, when Tim walks round to the right, his dialogue is quieter.&nbsp;This sounds different to the other&nbsp;dialogue in the film and therefore, is quite&nbsp;noticeable, especially as we can hear Tim's line "The game is a foot" quite clearly when he enters the owl academy but is a distance from the camera. If&nbsp;this line&nbsp;can't be made&nbsp;louder, it may be a case of cutting the line and dialogue leading up to it. If it cannot be fixed, cutting this line would be necessary as it&nbsp;brings down the&nbsp;quality of the film and doesn't add&nbsp;anything to the&nbsp;story. Relating back to previous research, I must not be afraid to cut something. If it doesn't add to the story then it needs cutting.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Viewing catch up</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">While I was&nbsp;viewing the edit, I decided to find out how their last&nbsp;tutorial went with Beth and Simon as I was unable&nbsp;to attend. Apart from some tightening of shots, Beth was very pleased&nbsp;with the progress made on the fine cut.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Simon's feedback:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Possibly change shot of dog round so we see Tim and Luke first before seeing the dog in scene 4. Only problem with that is that we don't have a shot of Tim picking a dog up as the dog was filmed on another day. Due to this, we need to see the dog as the first shot in scene 4.<br />- Audio on car park, scene 7 &amp; 9. Katie is currently working on this to improve it for the next fine cut.<br />- General tightening of shots. This is happening throughout the edit. The length of a shot may seem correct one day, but then the next time we look at it, it may need cutting down. As a result of this, refining the footage will be ongoing until the deadline.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Individual viewing on big screen (fine cut 2)</b></span><br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-toGQw8H9Jwk/XMBqwridjiI/AAAAAAAADkQ/3MNty3xy-L8sv-Xe3fYhg5YfewNszc_VwCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_7159.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><img border="0" data-original-height="839" data-original-width="1600" height="334" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-toGQw8H9Jwk/XMBqwridjiI/AAAAAAAADkQ/3MNty3xy-L8sv-Xe3fYhg5YfewNszc_VwCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_7159.JPG" width="640" /></span></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Fine cut 2 on big screen</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />We are due to have a big screen viewing after the Easter break. Katie, Alex and I felt that it would be best to view the film on the big screen before the group viewing. By doing this, we can see how it looks first to make any tweaks that may be needed. Ideally, we want the film to look its best before the rest of the group see it, which is why viewing it prior to the rest of the group is a good idea.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Katie, Alex and I met up in the Easter holidays at the studios and set up the latest fine cut (fine cut 2) on a projector in one of the lecture rooms.</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">My&nbsp;Feedback to individual big screen viewing:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Timing a bit quick?</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I felt that the timing was slightly faster in some parts of the film. As I have worked on the edit myself in the rough cut, I understand how difficult it is to view the edit in Premiere Pro as it lags a lot. Some parts of the edit, I felt went a lot quicker than the rest of the film. I put together the rough cut but as I haven't seen it for a while, it seems faster than when I was working on it. I understand that Katie has been changing bits that I originally worked on which is completely fine. I checked with them both that they were happy with the timing and pace of the film, in case this was something they didn't think of when watching the edit back. However, they were both happy with the timing, and as a result I was happy with it.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Tim's ear - weird yellow reflection.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">There was an odd yellow reflection on Tim's ear in scene 2, when he gets into the van after seeing the slogan. Katie and Alex didn't notice this until I pointed it out. I recommended Katie try to change this, whether it's by changing the colour slightly so the yellow colour isn't as vibrant and obvious.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />- Export at full quality next week. Should we do it before the viewing?&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During the viewing, Katie suggested exporting the edit at the full quality we want to export the final film at. I agreed with this, as we may not like it at the quality we have been working towards during the project, and we'd rather realise this now rather than on the final export. This point led me onto suggesting to do this export before the big screen viewing next week. I feel that this is important because we are watching it on the big screen in front of everyone to see how the quality and audio are on the big screen rather than a small Mac screen. However, so far we have been exporting the film at a lower resolution than what we want to export the final edit in to speed up the export process, purely for rough and fine cuts. As a result of this, I felt that it would defeat the point to show the group the edit in the lower resolution due to watching it to see how the quality is on a bigger scale. I suggested this to Katie so ideally she will export it at the real quality before the big screen viewing by next week.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />- Audio in car park (scenes 7 &amp; 9) - change audio so the pitch matches - different levels at the moment.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The audio in the car park of scenes 7 &amp; 9 is something we have struggled with from the beginning of the edit. We decided that an ADR day wasn't ideal due to the budget, so we thought we could solve it in the edit. Fortunately, the dialogue is still clear and we can hear their voices well. The background noise from the wind and the river is what is bringing the quality of the film down. To start solving this Katie put in a shot of the river so we establish the reason for the loud background noise. However, it was still quite prominent. At the moment the edit consists of some changes to the audio in those scenes, but it causes a pitch issue where the sound is louder and then quieter in different takes. This doesn't allow the sound to flow smoothly. The audio problem is more noticeable as it is now, with the pitch issues, rather than if it was loud but flowing smoothly. As a result of this,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Katie said she will take the changes off and simply try to lower the volume of the background noise.</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />- Stops quite abruptly after scene 9 (Tim shows Luke the drugs in the car park. Stops abruptly in night scene when Luke goes into enclosure. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I felt that some of the&nbsp;transitions&nbsp;weren't quite right. The scene stops abruptly at the end of scene 9 and 10 and personally, it feels a bit awkward. I checked with both Katie and Alex whether they wanted the hard cuts or a fade to black, and Alex said he'd rather the hard cut to match the tone of the film. I&nbsp;understand what he means - we&nbsp;haven't got any other fades due to creating a comedy the editing needs to be quick, and a fade&nbsp;isn't quick.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Game boy noises</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- All colour correction looks good on big screen</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Red eye from Mark's punch looks better now it's colour graded.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The red eye on Tim's face at the end of the film looks a lot better now it's colour graded. Throughout the rough cut I felt that it had an orange tone to it on camera, even though it didn't look like this in person. The orange tone made it look less believable to me, so I am pleased that it now has a bright shade of red.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Too much flapping sound from owl - notices more from the audio on big screen.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Katie added in more owl screeches and flapping&nbsp;noises for the owl punch scene, however we realised on the big screen with a better audio&nbsp;system, there was a bit too much flapping. We decided that we could do with less flapping in order to bring the&nbsp;believability up. I also think the added owl screeches have a slight echo on them, there may be another&nbsp;sound effect which may suit the situation better. As we are located outside, the echo in the owls screech&nbsp;didn't suit the scenario. I suggested this to Katie and she said she'd look for more owl screeches.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Turn saturation down slightly in The Bell Inn car park (scene 13).&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The general colour of scene 13 in the car park of The Bell Inn is quite bright. The bright sunlight may have added to this, Katie said she would play with the saturation in order to try and bring the brightness down to match the rest of the film.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Beginning titles</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Now the fine cut was developing really well, we starting thinking about titles and music. From the&nbsp;beginning our&nbsp;inspiration for VET-MAN was <i>The Thick Of It. </i>We used their filming and editing style to complete the&nbsp;film - this includes the titles. In <i>The Thick Of It </i>they simply&nbsp;have a black screen with white text on top. We wanted to replicate this for VET-MAN. The titles were due to be done in the fine cut, so Katie did this after fine cut 2. When I viewed the titles after she had created them I was surprised how small they were compared with the titles that we were taking inspiration from. I liaised with Alex about this and he explained that he liked the idea of a anticlimactic feel to the titles. The audience may be expecting big and bold titles, so it's the idea of doing the opposite to what they are expecting. The idea of the anticlimactic feel could also reflect Tim's character. He portrays the idea of being a successful vet even after the audience find out about the fake diploma. This can be shown in his confidence when he says "I'm a vet, I can fix this... door.... tools". Once he slips and kills the dog, the we see him as a failure and the idea of him being a successful vet is gone.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ljAs8VPd3K0/XNGR3yvYa2I/AAAAAAAAD6A/afwZz_FNfO0txeExCIFiQ0N9nUNFxdyDQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B15.10.19.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="480" data-original-width="1568" height="194" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ljAs8VPd3K0/XNGR3yvYa2I/AAAAAAAAD6A/afwZz_FNfO0txeExCIFiQ0N9nUNFxdyDQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-07%2Bat%2B15.10.19.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>The Thick Of It </i>titles (left) our titles (right)</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Music</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Alex chose the music&nbsp;for the film as he had a vision of what he wanted the music to sound like, however, from previous research from an article by Studio Binder, as part of my creative role of producing, I must "oversee post-production from editing, t</span><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">hrough music composition and picture lock" (StudioBinder, 2019). As I have been a part of the editing by&nbsp;creating the rough cut, scheduling fine cut reviews with Katie and giving feedback, this means that I have&nbsp;successfully been a&nbsp;part of the editing and picture lock. To follow&nbsp;through with my research, the producer is also involved with finer details such as the&nbsp;music, as a result of this I had to be a part of the music choices. I was happy for Alex to choose the music as long as I could review his choices to see if they fitted with the style of VET-MAN.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We&nbsp;originally&nbsp;didn't want to include&nbsp;any as our&nbsp;inspiration <i>The Thick Of It </i>doesn't have any music. However, we&nbsp;received feedback about adding music a few times&nbsp;during our&nbsp;viewings. As a result of this we decided to include a small amount. Alex decided that the best place to put the music was when we were inside Tim's mind when he believed he was being a successful vet. Along with my jump cuts, this may help bring this idea across to the audience. To reflect this, Alex wanted a superior theme to the music and then the idea of it stopping when we are back into reality, for example music over the surgery scene and then cut it when he slips and kills the dog.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once we cut back into reality and the music stops, we hope to make the audience believe we are now out of Tim's mind. Although we were undecided about music, we</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;knew we wanted some in the night scene due to the lack of dialogue. Alex suggested from the start to have a 'heist' type of music, which I agreed fit really well. I was confident with all Alex's choices surrounding the music. I really liked the idea of cutting it when we are back in reality, I think this will help the idea of Tim feeling superior. As I was happy with the music, they went ahead and put it into the places that Alex explained, I was very confident once I heard the edit back with the music. I think we have developed the film so far since the first rough cut that I created.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Overall, I think the film is coming along really well. The colour grade has made a big impact on the film and has improved it massively. The first scene was a horrible shade of yellow due to the sunlight reflecting off the curtains, however, Katie has done really well with the colour and it has more of a natural tone to it.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The sound effects have also improved the quality of the film. As the sound effects come into the film in the fine cut, I had to edit the film without them. It was difficult to enjoy editing the film when the sound and colour hadn't been touched at that point. However, now the majority of the sound effects and the colour is almost complete, I am starting to really like the look of the film. Personally, that in itself means that the film has developed well.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Katie has refined the edit even more than I had which is good. There are a couple of shots that she's taken out, such as the shot of the broken vase and a couple of lines from Luke. I agreed with her reasoning behind this because when she first had the fine cut she was looking at it with a fresh mind. That is what the edit needed to help refine it even further.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I think the music brings the edit together well, and is cleverly cut around the action.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- From previous research, I discovered that the producer should understand all "aspects of production from development through to final edits" (Levinson, 2018). I believe by scheduling fine cut viewings and being there to watch and give feedback that I have taken on the creative role of producing well. I have been present throughout production and after I passed the fine cut on, I was available for viewings to ensure the film was going in the correct direction, following our original plans.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>POSTER DEVELOPMENT</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">While I was working on&nbsp;the rough cut, Alex started playing around with the poster. I suggested asking Emily to create something for the poster, but we decided&nbsp;that we'd rather work on it ourselves for our project. Alex has had previous graphic design experience at school and he enjoys it in his spare time. As a result of this, I was happy for Alex to create the poster as he was keen to do it. Alex&nbsp;created a number of different examples of posters and I gave&nbsp;feedback on each one.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-1WqYCPWvhvI/XMSh77AaMfI/AAAAAAAADp0/7tofKTuYB0UNzc6I7LMxZsiDOYEhdYNsQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-27%2Bat%2B19.39.26.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="806" data-original-width="1150" height="448" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-1WqYCPWvhvI/XMSh77AaMfI/AAAAAAAADp0/7tofKTuYB0UNzc6I7LMxZsiDOYEhdYNsQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-27%2Bat%2B19.39.26.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Poster 1 &amp; 2&nbsp;</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Poster 1:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In order to get an example of the first poster, Alex picked two photos we took on the last shoot day that he liked the look of. This gave us an idea of how we could develop the poster from here. We wanted Tim's authoritativeness and Luke's innocence to come through in the poster, without giving too much away. The first poster started with the blood splatter as this is quite a prominent part of the story, it also goes well with Luke holding the needle. The audience may be able to get a gist of it what the story is about. This is ideal because the audience may be more likely to watch it if they can picture a story with the poster that interests them.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I liked the photos of the characters that Alex picked because they express the personalities well that I explained in the previous paragraph. Luke looks innocent as he's holding the syringe up with the needle pointing towards his face. It's as if he doesn't realise what a syringe is for and any other person wouldn't point the sharp end towards their face. In addition to this, the way Tim is standing expresses the confidence that he believes he has as a vet. From the start Alex said that he would quite like a superhero theme to the poster to go with our title of 'VET-MAN'. I believe that we have achieved the superhero look to the poster with Tim's body language. The authoritativeness that I mentioned before gives off the superhero look, as superhero's are shown in a good light in films, where vulnerable people look up to them. However, I felt that his facial expression looked a bit cocky with the raised eyebrows and one eye open more than the other, whereas Tim's photo in poster 2 his facial expression looks more serious and wise. I think the photo of Tim in poster 2 is ideal as we want the audience to think he knows what he's doing, and then they will find out that he doesn't.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Alex also said from the beginning that he wanted a 'comic book' look to the poster if we were going down the superhero idea, but I didn't feel that the design of this poster expressed that well.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Poster 2:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I like both photos in poster 1 of Tim and Luke but I don't think they look right together. The way they're positioned makes them look as if they are two completely separate scenarios. As soon as Alex showed me poster 2 I thought that the photos looked better together. They look as if they've come from the same scenario of Tim being brave while Luke stands behind scared and hugging the bag. Once I saw these photos together I was confident that they should be shown together in the poster.</span><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; margin-left: 1em; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-0d7E6oMYA1s/XMSjBNlZBjI/AAAAAAAADqQ/ytHUaewmE7Y9l1gquWbAq5aDHmWTBPn-ACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-27%2Bat%2B19.43.03.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="850" data-original-width="716" height="320" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-0d7E6oMYA1s/XMSjBNlZBjI/AAAAAAAADqQ/ytHUaewmE7Y9l1gquWbAq5aDHmWTBPn-ACLcBGAs/s320/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-27%2Bat%2B19.43.03.png" width="269" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Comic strip idea with photo collage</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">For this background, Alex put together a few BTS photos and stills from the edit to create a 'comic strip' look to reflect his idea of the comic book. He chose a variety of photos, and tried to include each character in the background. Reflecting on the collage, he's included Tess, Sheila, Luke, Tim, the van, the drugs and an owl.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">These photos can imply 'spoilers without context', as they include each aspect of the film, but the audience wouldn't be able to work out what happens from these photos. These types of posts are very popular on Twitter with the most popular at the moment being about </span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Avengers: End Game. </i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As </span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Avengers: End Game </i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">is such a long-awaited film that is part of a very well-known franchise, viewers are worried that they'll see spoilers about the film before they've seen it. As a result of this, people who were first to see it have been posting 'spoilers without context' where there are a number of completely different photos that make no sense unless you've seen the film. As this is very popular with a big franchise like Marvel, it may be worth using this idea in the poster. The only problem surrounding this idea is that you can't really see each photo in the background so the audience wouldn't be able to see the spoilers anyway. However, the background does take some of the focus off Tim and Luke and the meaning behind their body language. Although both ideas of the photo collage and the positioning of Tim and Luke are good ideas, they don't quite work together. I fed back that maybe a plain coloured background would be more suitable, as long as it's not white. I feel that the background would need to be a colour of some sort.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Another point that I fed back to Alex was that I wasn't too keen on the spots on Tim and Luke's faces. like the spotty comic look to the background, but it&nbsp;didn't look right on their faces. Alex took on this&nbsp;feedback and removed the spots from their faces.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I think that there is a lot going on in poster 2, and I feel that the focus should be on the main characters rather than the&nbsp;background that you&nbsp;can't really see anyway. After feeding this back to Alex he started on poster 3.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AQqM0VIyElw/XMSiUIEuxxI/AAAAAAAADp8/HjUUbSvan30oB5GxTBN-Jcha_EYKKGM5wCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-27%2Bat%2B19.41.02.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="932" data-original-width="1320" height="450" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AQqM0VIyElw/XMSiUIEuxxI/AAAAAAAADp8/HjUUbSvan30oB5GxTBN-Jcha_EYKKGM5wCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-27%2Bat%2B19.41.02.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Poster 3 &amp; 4</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Poster 3:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The poster has developed well without the spotty effect on the faces. I also quite like the plain background. That particular shade of grey brings out the colour in the rest of the poster, and keeps the focus on the characters. This is what I fed back about in the previous poster so I was immediately drawn to this. Although he has kept this idea all the way through the posters, I like the white outline around the characters. Even without the comic strip background, the outline gives off a cut out / pop art / comic look to it, which is what Alex originally wanted to go for to combine with the superhero idea.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I also like the new VET-MAN title rather than the logo we've been using for social media. As we've been looking at the VM logo throughout the project, it looks slightly boring and uninteresting on poster 1. It also looked as if it had a 'cut and paste' look to it, whereas, we want the poster to wow the audience and for it to be slightly different to the photos and videos I have already posted on the social media. I think the new title also gives off the comic book idea we want to come across. The bold, white writing stands out well too, it shouts 'VET-MAN' which is ideal for a poster in order to grab people's attention.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the spotty effect on the skin, I wasn't sure it looked right on the white title. Looking at poster 4, the title without the spotty effect looks as if it stands out more. I believe that the bolder, the better on a poster.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Poster 4:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we were starting to like the basic features of the poster, it was time to add more detail. For example, we all liked the positioning of the characters, the colours, and comic book effect, so now it was time to add in the titles that are featured at the bottom of every film poster, detailing the cast and main members of crew. From the start I wasn't keen on Ed and Dan's name at the top of the poster. I thought it should be featured in the small writing at the bottom. As we were happy with the poster design, it was just a case of rearranging the bottom titles and making them smaller as I felt that they took up too much from where they are positioned in poster 4. Alex made them fit on two lines and they looked a lot better and more professional.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once we had established the final poster, I contacted my local copy shop to get the poster printed in high quality, size A1. We also opted for a matt finish. We thought glossy may become too reflective so matt was the safer option. I collected the poster later that day.</span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The final poster</span></b><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-m2wSxR0-KbI/XMl5LWDGiHI/AAAAAAAADtQ/_7wGGomfVAEM11HN1y4NR8iyrcWYzkKRgCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_4261.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="1383" height="640" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-m2wSxR0-KbI/XMl5LWDGiHI/AAAAAAAADtQ/_7wGGomfVAEM11HN1y4NR8iyrcWYzkKRgCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_4261.JPG" width="552" /></a></div><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- While Alex was creating the different poster examples, I thought that I had made the right decision in letting us create the poster rather than asking Emily to create something. When we had our final poster, I thought that I could have considered asking Emily to create something anyway in case we were to like hers more or even if we liked different aspects about it to add to ours. Nevertheless, I am extremely happy with the outcome and I like the idea that we have created it to help showcase our project.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I think the photos chosen reflect Tim and Luke's personalities well. We were lucky to have two extremely good cast members for our main characters to help portray these characters well. Their body language and facial expressions look very effective on the poster, and give off the correct impression for the type of film we have created.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I really like the colours used in the final poster. As I said previously, I like the grey as it helps bring out the other colours well. I think the comic book idea has come across well with the spotty effect on the background, the white outline and the banner-like title. The white writing also looks good on the darker background. I am glad our photos have a darker tone so we can see the white writing well. I don't think it would have looked as effective if the colour scheme of the poster was made up of light colours with darker coloured writing.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>References:</i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>-&nbsp;<span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">StudioBinder. (2019).&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">What Does a Producer Do: The Various Types of Producers in Film &amp; TV.</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">&nbsp;Available: https://www.studiobinder.com/blog/what-does-a-producer-do/. Last accessed 24th April 2019.</span></i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;"><br /></span></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif; font-style: italic;">-&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif; font-style: italic;">Thom, R. (n/d).&nbsp;ADR.&nbsp;Available: http://filmsound.org/terminology/adr.htm. Last accessed 9th March 2019.</span></div></div></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-30787620057126897462019-04-11T20:14:00.001+01:002019-05-09T23:03:45.750+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Final Conversations with Cast <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Throughout the post-production process, I have been updating the cast and crew. As I have done throughout the&nbsp;whole project, I want to act professionally and it&nbsp;wouldn't be professional if I&nbsp;didn't speak to them after the shoot or re-shoots. In addition to this, if I&nbsp;hadn't kept in contact and kept updating them it&nbsp;wouldn't have been right to ask for the re-shoots in the first place. We&nbsp;don't see the cast&nbsp;regularly like the crew so it was my priority to contact the cast directly, and then we were&nbsp;able to update the crew casually when we saw them around University.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I first sent them a couple of messages about the edit and how well it was going. Then I arranged the&nbsp;specific re-shoots and voiceover day. Finally, I put the new footage and audio onto the timeline, had the final rough cut&nbsp;viewing and agreed we were completely finished with the cast. As soon as we knew we were finished with the cast I got in contact with all of them. Due to their own busy schedules, I didn't want them to be waiting for me to contact them for any other filming. By letting them know immediately, they know that can start planning their next projects without feeling the need to wait around in case we need them.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To follow with the final email, Alex suggested the idea of a feedback form. I have&nbsp;received feedback from the cast throughout&nbsp;production and I have documented this in the shoot day&nbsp;blog posts.&nbsp;However, the&nbsp;feedback was varied in&nbsp;terms of some cast members were more open about their opinions and some had more quiet personalities so we&nbsp;didn't hear as&nbsp;much from them. By creating the feedback form I am able to ask specific questions for each aspect of production - the organisational side,&nbsp;the direction and general&nbsp;feedback about the entirety of filming. Between Alex and myself, we couldn't think of any&nbsp;specific questions from Katie's point of view as the director of photography which is why we left it down to general questions at the end so&nbsp;they&nbsp;had the chance to comment on&nbsp;whatever they wanted - including the cinematography. Creating the form online gives the cast the opportunity to be as honest as they like. I like to think we did well on the shoot days and acted professionally, however, the cast may not think that. They will be more likely to be honest online, which is what we want for our evaluations, and we explained this at the beginning of the form. As a result of this, we agreed that putting the form online was the most appropriate way to gain feedback.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I felt that&nbsp;the feedback form, initially suggested by Alex, would be very beneficial in helping our&nbsp;evaluation towards the end of the&nbsp;project, for example, what went well, what they felt&nbsp;didn't go so well, if anything and what we could improve on. As a result of this, I was eager to go with the idea and create the form.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Firstly, Alex and I thought of questions we could ask:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />Direction<br />1. How do you find the casting process?<br />2. Did you feel as if you had a contribution to the script and direction?<br />3. Did you know what you were supposed to be doing in every scene? (i.e. was the direction clear and understandable?) <br />4. Any general feedback on the direction?<br /><br />Organisation<br />1. How would you rate the organisation of the project?<br />2. Did you feel like you were updated regularly?<br />3. How did you find the food on set?<br />4. Did you find the reimbursement process efficient?<br />5. Any other feedback?<br /><br />General<br />1. Did you feel as if you were looked after well?<br />2. Did you enjoy working on VET-MAN?<br />3. Any general comments?</span><br /><div><br /></div><div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once we felt as if we&nbsp;asked about each aspect appropriately, we created a&nbsp;questionnaire on Google Docs. This seemed a more professional way to gather feedback rather than sending questions for them to answer over email -&nbsp;instead I just sent the link to the questionnaire with the final 'thank you' email. We were also able to give them the option for multiple choice which made it easier to answer if the cast were busy with new projects or shoots. In&nbsp;addition to the&nbsp;multiple&nbsp;choice questions, we added a couple of long-answer questions by asking them to explain their answer. We used these because some of the multiple choice questions were quite&nbsp;vague, such as "did you feel as if you were&nbsp;looked after well?". By adding in the long-answer&nbsp;question, the cast would be able to answer more specifically.&nbsp;This may have been&nbsp;beneficial if maybe one of the cast&nbsp;members felt as if they were&nbsp;looked after well in terms of warmth (enough breaks, not over-worked), but they may not have&nbsp;appreciated the food choices and didn't feel as if they were looked after well in terms of food.&nbsp;</span></div><div><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-kZTW7I_fOdU/XK-FxIbxu1I/AAAAAAAADhM/1asi7YsEZGoSd1Dn3vAOjpPlkaoqfE87ACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-11%2Bat%2B19.21.38.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1025" data-original-width="1600" height="408" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-kZTW7I_fOdU/XK-FxIbxu1I/AAAAAAAADhM/1asi7YsEZGoSd1Dn3vAOjpPlkaoqfE87ACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-11%2Bat%2B19.21.38.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; 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, &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Throughout production my aim was to keep on top of the money that we were spending from the budget. This meant that if either Katie or Alex asked&nbsp;about&nbsp;the money that was left in the budget I could bring up the expenditure log and show them. If I&nbsp;hadn't kept track of each and every bit of money spent then I&nbsp;wouldn't be up-to-date with how much money we were&nbsp;spending and then we may have gone over the budget without knowing. The importance of keeping track of the budget was shown when we had to extend the allowance when we were getting low for the re-shoot. As I now know we went over the budget, if I hadn't kept an eye on our outgoings, we may have gone over without realising.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I used the money expenditure log for exactly what it was meant for. I researched into ways to keep track of a budget in a previous blog post <i>Handling the Budget During Production&nbsp;</i>and the expenditure log seemed the most suitable method for me.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we progressed through the production period, I filled out the table with our outgoings. As the expenditure log is predominantly meant to record outgoings rather than income, any income I received, such as any clothing / prop returns I made within the 30 day store policy or any additional donations, I highlighted these in green so it was clear to see what was income rather than outgoings.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I initially&nbsp;researched into&nbsp;budgeting in&nbsp;the pre-production unit. While I was creating the&nbsp;budget and&nbsp;slowly deducting and adding amounts to the total, I kept in mind indie producer, Jennifer Westin's, advice. She suggested to have "a 'home base' location" (Westin, 2014) during production. I&nbsp;carried this forward in terms of each day we were outside on location we had an area inside where we could have a break. This area was used for somewhere to meet with the crew before hand and somewhere we could welcome the cast. When we filmed for two days at the Owl Academy, we had a&nbsp;small base area which was outside. All the other outside locations had bases inside, for example, in Margate we were based at the house we used for&nbsp;Sheila's house in the film. We also did this in the re-shoot as I wanted to act just as professionally in the re-shoot as we did in the main shoot week. In addition to this, on the final filming day in the main shoot week we were also&nbsp;primarily filming outside, scene 2, when Tim meets Luke and sees the van for the first time. However, as we did in Margate, we based ourselves in a house which was a 3 minute drive away. Although Jennifer's initial advice was to have "one primary location" (Westin, 2014) for the entirety of filming, due to the distance between each of our locations, this was impossible. Nevertheless, as part of my location hunting, I made sure we had a&nbsp;separate 'home base' for each location where our cast and crew could have a break. Jennifer&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">also advised to "not have the whole film set in one location" (Westin, 2014). From the pre-production unit, I had each location confirmed and we already knew that the&nbsp;majority of the scenes were filmed in different locations. Fortunately, we&nbsp;didn't have to pay for any of our locations otherwise this may have had a negative impact on the budget.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Jennifer suggested to&nbsp;"shoot while locations are open" (Westin, 2014) as a location owner is more likely to&nbsp;charge if you want to shoot while they're shut. This would mean staff having to open up the premise when they're not meant to be in. I kept this in mind when organising the shoot day at The Bell Inn. When I was in contact with The Bell Inn landlord, I offered to either&nbsp;arrange the shoot for just before they open or when they are open. I let the landlord decide as I would rather film around his times rather than getting them in the pub when they're not meant to. I did this in order to prevent paying for the location. The pub opens for the public at 11.30am and he said he would be in the building from 9am which would suit him. This worked well because although the pub wasn't open for the public, the landlord and other staff members were in from 9am and they were happy for us to film from that time.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Re-shoot travel expenditure log</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To keep the two travel expenditure logs separate, I created a new one for the re-shoot (see the main travel log in blog post <i>Budget Before Re-shoot</i>). I felt the need to create a new travel log, but not a new main money expenditure log as the budget was constantly changing and it made sense to continue this throughout the whole of the production and re-shoot period. Yet, creating two smaller travel logs instead of adding it all onto one and making one larger log made most sense to me. Below is the re-shoot travel log. It is smaller than the main travel log as we only re-shot once and conducted the voice over day. As I did on the main shooting period, I reimbursed the cast and crew the day after we finished filming. They took time out of their day to come and work with us so I wanted to reimburse them as soon as I could.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span> <iframe height="600" src="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vTNFAXlJ0pEhq4dmwZ8z_rgYfVfYyi8XW8K9hmuVJOLnxTA51r20UpOplXWjP4UUoxONck2YjIr-DqV/pubhtml?widget=true&amp;headers=false" width="700"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Comparison from estimated&nbsp;to actual budget</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During the pre-production unit I overestimated some aspects of the budget in order to prevent going over the budget, however, this didn't quite go to plan. I overestimated on aspects such as the food for the shoot days, especially when we ate out as it was impossible to guess how much each person would spend. These days in particular were the days in which we actually saved money. Although I said that the cast and crew could get whatever food they want, they all ordered respectful amounts which I am very grateful for. This would be the reason as to why we underspent on these days. However, we overspent on a few more aspects which would have led to going over the budget. Van insurance was underestimated - when I calculated the price in the previous unit, I found the insurance for £88, however, as insurance prices are always changing I couldn't set this as the actual price. Reflecting back on the estimated budget now, I feel that I should have overestimated the van insurance as I know from my own car insurance that prices are always changing. Unfortunately I didn't think of this at the time. Nevertheless, in the main shoot week we spent £209 on the van insurance and I know for a fact that I wouldn't have overestimated that much, so we still would have been over budget on that. I also didn't factor in van insurance into the re-shoot costs, in case we had to use the van again for Tim. It was inevitable that Alex was going to have to use the van again as the van is at most locations.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Although I included food costs for the crew in the estimated budget, Katie, Alex and I agreed to try and sort the travel for the crew ourselves to save money. This didn't go to plan due to circumstances such as Katie not being able to drive her car over the shoot week and the fact that the van only had two front seats. As a result of this, Alix had to get the train to each location and Katthaliya drove herself to the locations. They were both completely fine with this, it just meant spending more money out of the budget. Beth and Harriet I was able to take to the different locations as they live local to me so there was no extra expense there and I was also able to drive Gina on her days. When Aidan helped us out, Alex was able to drive him in the spare seat of the van. In addition to this, Alex Baldwin, George and Jack didn't want any reimbursements for their fuel, which we were really grateful for.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We were&nbsp;initially under budget for costumes as I only had to buy two&nbsp;hoodies for Tim and Luke and a cardigan for Sheila. As I&nbsp;explained in the&nbsp;previous unit, I only brought cheap clothes due to the fact we were going to get them dirty and we&nbsp;didn't want to spend too much on&nbsp;clothing that had the intention of getting dirty. However, closer to the shoot week I felt it would be best to buy a few more hoodies and cardigans so we had more than one chance to get&nbsp;the blood stains accurate. As Tim get's covered in blood when he slips and pierces the dog I thought that he would be needing more costumes that the other two characters.&nbsp;Especially with the fact&nbsp;that Luke and Sheila only get a hand print on their&nbsp;shoulders, this is more controlled than spraying blood over someone. As a result of this, I felt confident in getting a few more black hoodies for Tim and a fewer amount of grey hoodies and cardigans. Altogether, I had 4 black hoodies, 3 grey hoodies and 3&nbsp;cardigans. Surprisingly, when it came to shooting we only used one hoodie for Tim but we used 2 out of 3 of the&nbsp;grey hoodies and cardigans. &nbsp;This was still a&nbsp;success as I had enough&nbsp;grey hoodies and cardigans for the amount of times we tried the blood hand print. Luckily for the re-shoot I was able to wash the hoodies and cardigan and they came out as clean as they&nbsp;would've been in the shop, as a&nbsp;result of this, I&nbsp;didn't have to spend&nbsp;even more money from the budget. However, due to buying a couple of clothing pieces for each character, we went over budget on costume. I believe that this was worth it though, as we were able to continue doing the&nbsp;blood splatter and hand prints until we were happy with them.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I was thankful for the fact I added in 'Shoot day extras' on the budget as we had to buy a total of 4 packets of additional AA batteries for the tascam. None of us realised the amount of power we would need as we&nbsp;haven't created as much footage a 20 minute film needs like this before.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We also welcomed Mark into our cast at the beginning of production. As a&nbsp;result of this, I had to add in his travel&nbsp;reimbursement. As he was local&nbsp;to the area this wasn't a lot more which was&nbsp;beneficial towards the budget.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Although I&nbsp;considered van insurance for the main shoot week for Alex to drive the van, I&nbsp;didn't&nbsp;consider Tim&nbsp;driving the van, even though I&nbsp;always knew he was going to need&nbsp;insurance. However, I&nbsp;didn't consider van&nbsp;insurance within the re-shoot costs which added a substantial&nbsp;amount to the budget. Although we&nbsp;didn't know what part of the film we would re-shoot, if any, I should&nbsp;have considered the idea of the additional van insurance. Even if we weren't re-shooting a scene where Tim drives the van, Alex would need to have been insured on it to get it to the re-shoot location. As I said&nbsp;previously, when I created the estimate budget, I&nbsp;didn't know if we would re-shoot or not, however, I should have considered it. For the re-shoot we had to insure Alex and Tim on the van for the same&nbsp;amount of time as we&nbsp;didn't need the van for as long this time, whereas, in the main shoot week we&nbsp;didn't need Tim insured on&nbsp;the van as long as Alex. However, we may have been more aware of&nbsp;the possible additional insurance cost if I had&nbsp;considered it in the initial budget.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The final budget sheet is shown below. The rows highlighted in red are when we overspent on each part of the budget and the rows highlighted in green are when we went under budget. The&nbsp;rows in white are aspects of the&nbsp;budget I&nbsp;didn't initially consider and had to add in throughout production. The table shows we went over budget by a&nbsp;total of £162.91&nbsp;which&nbsp;leads me to believe that suggesting for us to put in an additional £100&nbsp;each was a good choice as we&nbsp;received about £43.57 back at the end of the re-shoot period.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: -webkit-standard;"><br /></span></span></span> <iframe height="700" src="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vSWBfp6Bd5t4PVNdovgb2tjzVhVV17zHha3tvLyx-KWov1oyhQR2vEuVMqCshgL0dIM5Lsz2OT71WLV/pubhtml?widget=true&amp;headers=false" width="700"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I brought the clothing with the intention of getting dirty just&nbsp;before the main shoot days, however, as we re-shot the scene with the blood I had to&nbsp;keep the unused hoodie and cardigan for longer than expected and it passed the&nbsp;store returns date. As a&nbsp;result of this, I wasn't able to return the unused clothes which meant we&nbsp;didn't get any money back from the costume into the budget.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- After I had completed the 'actual cost'&nbsp;column I realised how&nbsp;beneficial&nbsp;it was to have the two columns in order to compare the individual costs. By updating the initial budget and&nbsp;separating it out like it is above, I was able to compare each individual cost to see where we went over and under and by how much. This was helpful to work out the difference of each cost from when I planned the budget in pre-production to what we actually spent in production.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Throughout&nbsp;pre-production and&nbsp;production I have learnt to consider&nbsp;absolutely&nbsp;everything that may affect the budget. It was difficult to predict exactly each cost that was&nbsp;going to be coming out of the budget, however, I may have been able to predict a few more than what I did. For&nbsp;example, additional van&nbsp;insurance for possible re-shoots was quite obvious as I knew the van was featured in the&nbsp;majority of the scenes, but I simply&nbsp;didn't think to add it to the&nbsp;budget.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>References:</i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>-&nbsp;<span style="color: #222222; text-align: center;">Westin, J. (2014).&nbsp;10 Tips for Successfully Producing a Micro-Budget Feature.&nbsp;Available: https://www.indiewire.com/2014/05/10-tips-for-successfully-producing-a-micro-budget-feature-25970/. Last accessed 23rd Oct 2018.</span></i></span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-55900785776447496192019-03-27T13:10:00.000+00:002019-05-09T23:03:21.930+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Development of Post-Production Schedule<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Post-production schedule:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vSCXs4NvPZ238WtqT9curxTyfJ27XKE-24rY0qEBbKyTTA0bj407wpnexsCSC91xQnKm9TRcvKp6alT/pubhtml?widget=true&amp;headers=false" width="750"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During the pre-production unit I created a post-production schedule. This was difficult to create as I had to try and predict what would happen 4 months in advance, obviously we didn't know whether we would have to re-shoot or schedule any new filming days. I carried out research on how to create a&nbsp;post-production schedule as I wasn't even sure on how to lay it out or what to include in it at the time. I initially&nbsp;scheduled the rough cut to only take a week without taking into consideration the time it takes to sync the audio. Immediately, this made me 2 days behind the first&nbsp;schedule.&nbsp;However, at the time of creating the post-production schedule, I stated that I would start the edit a week after we&nbsp;wrapped filming. I did this with the intention of giving us all a weeks break, however, when it actually came to finishing filming on the 22nd&nbsp;February, I realised I wanted to get into the edit as soon as possible to start the post-production process. As a&nbsp;result of this, I started syncing the audio on the 25th February rather than the 4th March like I had&nbsp;scheduled. To start with, the time it took to sync the audio and then starting the edit a week early&nbsp;seemed to match up as I was&nbsp;behind but ahead.&nbsp;However, shortly after this we realised we needed to re-shoot and hold a voiceover day and it made sense for me to keep hold of the rough cut while organising the re-shoot. As a result of this, we were then behind schedule. The fine cut was supposed to start on the week commencing 15th March, but as it can be seen below, I had the rough cut for a while after this throughout the voiceover and re-shoot days. &nbsp;</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XntKBXmGcOg/XJzZuVwHMiI/AAAAAAAADa4/y8HteVkB38wzpEqixqe7nxteEUwsOpnQACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-28%2Bat%2B14.26.41.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="761" data-original-width="1600" height="304" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XntKBXmGcOg/XJzZuVwHMiI/AAAAAAAADa4/y8HteVkB38wzpEqixqe7nxteEUwsOpnQACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-28%2Bat%2B14.26.41.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Updated post-production schedule</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the re-shoot we shot scenes 4 &amp; 6, so before this I had continued working on the other scenes so&nbsp;after the re-shoot I would&nbsp;be able to work just on the new footage. Relating back to Simon's feedback on editing the film as a whole rather than in sections, means that it worked well for me to k</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">eep the rough cut until after the re-shoot and voiceover day. This prevented me from constantly passing it to Katie to do a bit of the fine cut and then getting it passed back to me to do the rough cut on the new footage.</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;I wanted to get the film to a good standard and as close as the&nbsp;final film as possible before passing it on.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I also scheduled&nbsp;separate days to have viewings with the director, Alex. However, he attended the studios on most of the same days that I did so he was there to oversee the edit in many stages rather than setting a date for him to see it has a whole. This was&nbsp;beneficial for me as there were sections of the edit where I&nbsp;didn't know how he wanted them to look. Therefore, having him sat next to me most days meant that I could ask questions and get his&nbsp;advice on the edit. This also sped up the creation of the rough cut as I was able to ask as I&nbsp;edited, rather than spending time creating an edit for him to say a lot needed changing. We solved problems together, such as&nbsp;continuity or what to do due to lack of coverage, which worked really&nbsp;well.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I amended the audio as I went, however, any specific audio like getting atmos from online or any serious sound editing was&nbsp;scheduled for the fine cut. Therefore, the&nbsp;audio is&nbsp;constantly being worked on from&nbsp;rough to fine cut.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I&nbsp;finally came to a point in the edit where I felt that the footage was in the correct places and it was a case of refining some of the scenes and concentrating on audio and sound effects. I made sure to do this before our viewings with Beth and Simon on the 26th March with the intention of them agreeing that it was a case of refining and sound work. In Beth's feedback, she said that it would be beneficial for me to get someone to watch it who hasn't been staring at it for weeks so they could tell whether they are watching something that isn't that funny / doesn't add to the story. As both Simon and Beth said that it was a case of refining the edit now, I decided that it would be a good time to pass the edit onto Katie as she hasn't been involved with the rough cut and therefore, would work on it with a fresh mind. We also agreed to swap films with Aimee and Will's group to watch each others objectively.</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;As a result of this, I handed the edit over to Katie on the 26th March with the intention of her attempting some of the&nbsp;sound design before we see Aimee and Will's group. I scheduled a short viewing with the other group on the following Friday 29th March.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hCT93qbgobs/XKuLvvRGbXI/AAAAAAAADfE/v8GfPk3XIeEke6qfwsGxI2LpELbDJDyzwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-08%2Bat%2B18.57.56.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="624" data-original-width="1450" height="274" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hCT93qbgobs/XKuLvvRGbXI/AAAAAAAADfE/v8GfPk3XIeEke6qfwsGxI2LpELbDJDyzwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-08%2Bat%2B18.57.56.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">From rough cut to fine cut</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Fine cut schedule</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The schedule below starts from the first full week after the fine cut was handed over. As I did &nbsp;for the rough cut part of the schedule, I had included our timetabled sessions, such as edit viewings and the studio production. In the fine cut, Katie will be focusing on the audio, sound effects and after this, the colour grade. I thought I would start by scheduling just the audio and sound effects for the first full week of the fine cut, until the next viewing on the 9th April. From this viewing was a good place to start the colour grade because, ideally, the audio and sound effects would have improved for the viewing with Beth and Simon, giving Katie the opportunity to start the colour grade after this.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-kCQTjoNMlG4/XMWUq_dI7eI/AAAAAAAADqo/Q7QX3tUq_jsCgHWBv0li6ipGDylZpBkQwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-28%2Bat%2B12.54.38.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="440" data-original-width="1104" height="254" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-kCQTjoNMlG4/XMWUq_dI7eI/AAAAAAAADqo/Q7QX3tUq_jsCgHWBv0li6ipGDylZpBkQwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-28%2Bat%2B12.54.38.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">First full 2 weeks of fine cut</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As a group, we decided to come into the studios to edit in the Easter break. As a result of this, I continued the edit into these two weeks. The area is covered in a shade of grey as we are not&nbsp;scheduled to be in over these weeks. However, I have continued the fine cut,&nbsp;audio, sound effects and grade into these weeks due to the fact that we have decided to come in. Although I have scheduled the fine cut&nbsp;throughout the whole of the Easter break, we&nbsp;won't be attending the studios for the duration of these two weeks, only a few days for each week. I felt it was necessary to include the bank holidays as we&nbsp;won't be attending the&nbsp;studios on these days.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-clu1H76UEg0/XNQ5joxjO8I/AAAAAAAAD9w/otfM3g5TAQ8xlEGYggTk75aWqViYmFnQQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B15.29.49.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="482" data-original-width="1258" height="244" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-clu1H76UEg0/XNQ5joxjO8I/AAAAAAAAD9w/otfM3g5TAQ8xlEGYggTk75aWqViYmFnQQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B15.29.49.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Now we are in the final week of the project. Katie has amended the audio for scenes 7 and 9 (academy car park) and added in the final sound effects and music. We are on track with finishing and handing in the edit on the 10th May.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Gphs4yEhXNc/XNQ5tEYJ1HI/AAAAAAAAD94/Pz_NK_NzDjkwU81RdgCHIbebdoxxfVKdgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B15.31.03.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="497" data-original-width="1042" height="304" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Gphs4yEhXNc/XNQ5tEYJ1HI/AAAAAAAAD94/Pz_NK_NzDjkwU81RdgCHIbebdoxxfVKdgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B15.31.03.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">What went well?</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Creating the post-production&nbsp;schedule in the Pre-Production Unit was&nbsp;beneficial as I had something to compare the&nbsp;real edit process to.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">By updating the post-production schedule as we go&nbsp;through the project, I have been able to be more&nbsp;detailed for when Katie and I started specific aspects&nbsp;of editing. For&nbsp;example in the first post-production schedule I simply had a&nbsp;title of fine cut and that was it. However, as we've progressed through the edit stage, I have been&nbsp;able to add in more refined headings such as sound effects and colour grade. In addition to this, I have been able to document where each of these parts started from. This means I will be able to reflect on the schedule with the&nbsp;correct details on it.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">post-production schedule has&nbsp;been&nbsp;beneficial in terms of seeing where we are in our project. About 3 weeks away from the hand in, I knew the deadline was approaching but I&nbsp;didn't realise actually how close it was. I informed Katie and Alex of the limited amount of time we had left and we all become more focused on the edit to try to make it the best it can be before the hand in. If I&nbsp;didn't keep&nbsp;referring back to the schedule or hadn't made one at all, then I may not have realised how close we were to the deadline, and we may have fallen behind with the edit and then possibly struggled to finish it on time.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What&nbsp;didn't go so well?</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>&nbsp;</b>- At the time of creating the post-production schedule, I&nbsp;didn't take into consideration every part of the process which meant we&nbsp;weren't on schedule during the rough cut. In particular I didn't consider the syncing the audio and how long this would take. However, with the fine cut being finished when we hand in the project in May, meant that we&nbsp;didn't have a third section of the edit to keep on&nbsp;schedule with. As a&nbsp;result of this, as soon as I handed over the edit to Katie we were back on schedule with the fine cut.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What&nbsp;have I learnt?</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I&nbsp;have learnt to&nbsp;research&nbsp;thoroughly into something which is going to be done in the future. If I had researched at the time of making the schedule every single thing which needed to be done in the post-production stage, such as&nbsp;syncing the audio and planning for re-shoots, then we may have been on&nbsp;schedule more than what we were.&nbsp;</span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-37359040682222712402019-03-26T13:17:00.000+00:002019-05-09T23:03:09.575+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Creating Rough Cut 4 <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I had completed Rough Cut 3 ready for the viewing with Simon and Beth and I planned to create Rough Cut 4 for any changes they suggested for the rough cut before I could pass it on to the fine cut.</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /><br /><b>Final changes include:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b>Tighter shot on “I’m VET-MAN”&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I agreed with this piece of advice within scene 1 as it is an important and comedic part of the story. This could also be the place in which the titles appear which would bring more significance to it. Due to this, I understood that it required a more focused, close-up shot. I changed this accordingly, however, we didn't have the coverage for the close up that I pictured in my head when I received this feedback, but we had a mid shot (shown in the second photo below). The first photo below shows the shot that Tim initially says "I'm VET-MAN" in, and the second photo, shows the mid shot that I changed it to. Although this is a mid shot and not a close up, it focuses on just Tim instead of Tess and Tim which is the point that the feedback was referring to. As the line "I'm VET-MAN" is important to the story and adds to the comedy, we really needed to see that line come from a shot of just Tim, which I understand. Obviously the shot is very dark but it will be corrected during the fine cut.</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GNgxb3VUpr0/XMG-wDvwKZI/AAAAAAAADko/1dfbSLgFHdYqLwBQE3miCPq7VvtTXhlGACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-25%2Bat%2B15.05.04.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1124" data-original-width="1174" height="612" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GNgxb3VUpr0/XMG-wDvwKZI/AAAAAAAADko/1dfbSLgFHdYqLwBQE3miCPq7VvtTXhlGACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-25%2Bat%2B15.05.04.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />I held the shot until he knocks the vase off the table by the door, before cutting back to see Tess's reaction, instead of cutting back to the two shot, I felt that this would be too much cutting around and the mid shot was sufficient enough to continue until I needed to cut back to Tess.<br /><br />Tighter in owl academy car park</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I was advised to make scene 7 tighter in the car park of The Kent Owl Academy. I agreed with this point too, I felt that the sequence leading up to Tim and Luke talking was quite long compared to the rest of the film. In order to shorten it slightly I first took out the shot of the van where we watch Luke get the bag out of the bag of the van. This shot is quite long and all we are doing is watching Luke get the bag out and meet Tim at the front of the van. I decided that this shot wasn't working and wasn't necessary. I didn't think twice about whether I should keep the shot in or not as I thought back to my research with Anthony Boys &nbsp;and he advised to take a shot out if it's simply not working or adding anything to the story. With this in mind, I didn't hesitate to take it out. My feedback was to make the scene shorter and this was the perfect shot to remove without taking anything away from the story. The audience know how important the bag is from the first scene, and it's inevitable that they would take it with them. As a result of this, I didn't think we needed to see Luke getting the bag out of the van.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The new sequence of when they arrive at the academy are the two shots below:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-s2ceUQzzr4Y/XMHE6JzWKQI/AAAAAAAADk0/XVz0h_-uuUYWlUpgKg-U6I4U_xDWSIOVQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-25%2Bat%2B15.31.19.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="403" data-original-width="1600" height="160" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-s2ceUQzzr4Y/XMHE6JzWKQI/AAAAAAAADk0/XVz0h_-uuUYWlUpgKg-U6I4U_xDWSIOVQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-25%2Bat%2B15.31.19.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">New sequence for arriving at the academy</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />“...besides, I need to get changed”&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I was reminded that I had&nbsp;accidentally cut out one of Tim's lines "besides, I need to get changed" in scene 4, and&nbsp;because this highlights the reason as to why Tim changes clothes half way through the film, it was necessary to be kept in the edit. To rectify this, I just searched through the synced audio for the clip which included this line and replaced it.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once I had completed these changes I exported the film into rough cut 4, we had all agreed that we were happy with the placement of the footage, and it was time for it to be passed onto Katie for the fine cut. She will now be able to refine the film even further by adding sound effects and working on the audio.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Rough cut 4</span></b><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b> <iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4lbq1SZST7I" width="711"></iframe><br /><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span>-&nbsp;<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Although I&nbsp;haven't exported each video in relation to the different stages of the&nbsp;rough cut that I researched into, I have still followed the stages in order to end on the final rough cut. I initially researched into rough cuts and the stages an editor needs to go through to do create a successful edit, and I have followed these, but I haven't exported the video after each stage was complete. For example, I logged and synced the footage and audio as I found in my research. Then the&nbsp;assembly cut was essentially rough cut 1, however, it had a bit of refinement in it,&nbsp;such as preventing the audio from peaking. This meant that rough cut 1 was an assembly cut leading into a&nbsp;rough cut. Rough cut 2 was simply a more developed rough cut, and rough cut 3 was the edit that I focused on with Alex,&nbsp;which makes this the directors cut. Alex had a say in each of the rough cuts as I&nbsp;didn't want Alex to dislike something I had spent time editing, but his focus was on rough cut 3, helping me get it ready for another viewing and ready to be passed onto Katie. Rough cut 4 was the final changes from feedback I&nbsp;received on my final&nbsp;viewing, so it was up-to-date for Katie. I felt this made more sense&nbsp;because the&nbsp;majority of changes were happening within the rough cut, and if I had exported the video after making all the changes&nbsp;that I've spoken about in my blog posts for rough cuts 1 - 4, then I&nbsp;wouldn't have had the videos showing the improvements from each&nbsp;rough cut.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- One of Simons first bit of advice when it came to the edit was to work on the edit as a whole, rather than sections. I took this to mean that there shouldn't be sections of the edit that are better than the others, the edit should be the same quality throughout on each rough cut. I believe I followed this through each of my rough cuts, apart from just before the re-shoot. I wanted to work on the other scenes to avoid wasting time on the edit, and then my focus was only on the re-shoot and GVs when I got back into the edit. Although, I was advised to work on it as a whole, I believed I was using my initiative here by not wasting time before the re-shoots. I didn't change the other scenes a lot, only refined them slightly. It would be a different case if I had passed the edit onto Katie to work on the audio and colour grade it while leaving the re-shoot scenes until last. As a result of this, I only refined the rest of the scenes slightly while waiting for the re-shoot so I believe that I did work on the edit as a whole and I am very impressed at what I have achieved over the past month in my part of the post-production stage.&nbsp;</span>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-43237567637959330432019-03-22T15:17:00.000+00:002019-05-10T07:40:36.083+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Creating Rough Cut 3 & Feedback<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Following my feedback from Alex and Simon of rough cut 2, I continued to improve and create the third rough cut. This is the first rough cut after our re-shoot and GV pickups have been filmed, so this cut should look most like the final film. Apart from this new footage Alex is happy with the rest of the visuals and once I have placed the new footage into the timeline, it'll be time to start shortening the footage and making it quicker to add to the comedic tone.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">One piece of feedback we&nbsp;received was to cut up the conversation in the car in scene 2, and maybe discover and&nbsp;discuss the drugs&nbsp;once we have got to the owl academy. This referred me back to my research from the stages of the rough cut. Now all the footage is down, it will be clearer to see if any of the lines or scenes need changing around. This is the stage in which I can start asking myself questions as Brad Schwartz suggested, such as how can I enhance the story? Can I restructure elements in order to make the story more powerful? So far I have been quite confident that the edit is making sense in the same order as the script, however, when the advice about the drugs came to light, it made me re-think the edit.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I&nbsp;liaised with Alex about the drugs conversation and he said that he would rather the drugs reveal before they reverse off the&nbsp;drive, as Alex aimed to show Tim exploring the van as soon as he gets in it. If he had driven off, hit the dog, met Sheila and then arrived at the academy, it would be odd if Tim started looking&nbsp;around the van after everything has happened. Alex and I established the idea of&nbsp;keeping the drugs conversation in the same place when the van is on the drive,&nbsp;however, this got me&nbsp;thinking of the rest of&nbsp;the story and&nbsp;whether any other sections of the story would be better rearranged.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /><b>New footage for Rough Cut 3</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As a group we decided to re-shoot scenes 4 and 6 and collect additional footage of the Vet Van. I scheduled the re-shoot with our cast and crew relatively soon after we decided to go ahead with it so we could keep progressing in the edit, and so I wouldn't have to leave it on rough cut 2 for too long. During the two weeks between deciding the re-shoot date and the actual shoot, I improved the scenes that we were happy with in the edit, therefore, by the time we re-shoot, I will be ready to import the new footage on the timeline. This should be the only thing I need to work on as the rest I had continued with while arranging the re-shoot and GV day.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to when I started the edit a few weeks ago, I had to sync the audio on the new footage in the re-shoot. For the GV's we had the microphone on top of the camera to get atmos next to the roads, therefore, this audio didn't need to be synced. We didn't have as many takes for the re-shoot in Margate as we did last time. Possibly because we were more focused on the shots we knew we needed to re-shoot. However, this made syncing the audio for the new footage take less time than it did during the main shoot week which was beneficial to me.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I mentioned in the <i>Re-Shoot, GV Pickups &amp; Dog Shot</i>&nbsp;blog post, I tried to stay in the mindset of an editor in order to improve shots and audio which didn't quite work in the edit, making the most of the time we had with the cast and equipment. As a result of this, I remembered to ask to use the clapperboard in the surgery scene as this is where I struggled to sync the audio the first time round.</span><br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8gfQ0r12144/XJYPTwxDQSI/AAAAAAAADXs/70MN-i_nmB8hJtoRGz2VTqFGSYorMT0fgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B10.49.06.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="548" data-original-width="1154" height="302" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8gfQ0r12144/XJYPTwxDQSI/AAAAAAAADXs/70MN-i_nmB8hJtoRGz2VTqFGSYorMT0fgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B10.49.06.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Syncing audio</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">From the first edit, I knew that Alex wanted the surgery scene to be choppy and fast-paced as at this point in the story we are in Tim's mind where he&nbsp;believes he is being a successful vet (similarly to the first scene of Tim searching through Tess's&nbsp;living room drawers, and setting up the printer to print his fake diploma). As a&nbsp;result of re-shooting and getting more coverage I was able to use a number of different shots to cut together quickly showing the build up of the surgery on the dog. We had enough footage so I was able to make the shots quick, without making the scene go by too quickly.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">While I was creating Rough Cut 3 after the re-shoot, I noticed a&nbsp;continuity issue. In the mid shots of Luke getting the tools and&nbsp;stethoscope out of the bag and running round the van to give them to Tim. When he does this he&nbsp;stays there and keeps his head poked into the van, however, when we shot the&nbsp;preparation for the surgery scene we&nbsp;didn't think about Luke's head having to stay in the top left corner, we instead told him that he wouldn't be needed for these shots. As a result of this, the footage shot from inside the back of the van, which pans to meet Luke and Tim, shows Luke's head near Tim's watching what he's doing with the gloves and syringe. But then I cut to Tim prepping the&nbsp;surgery and Luke&nbsp;isn't there. To add to the lack of&nbsp;continuity, once Sheila notices them and walks over, we see Luke jump and look away from the&nbsp;inside of the van and towards Sheila. To put this more simply, in the current edit Luke is there, then he's not and then he's there again. However, we didn't get any footage of prepping the surgery with Luke's face in the corner so I am unable to make these shots flow well as they are. In order to work&nbsp;around this, I liaised with Alex and we agreed to crop into the footage with just Tim prepping the surgery, making the shot closer to his face with the intention of cropping out Luke's face in the top left corner.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The difference in the shots before and after the crop is shown below.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif; font-size: large;"><i>Before:</i></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ylqje7RT8FA/XJ4GKt5ZcxI/AAAAAAAADbs/trNfTwFy3hIRBBfjQTE-agK40cnw8UlGACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-29%2Bat%2B11.48.24.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="664" data-original-width="1230" height="344" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ylqje7RT8FA/XJ4GKt5ZcxI/AAAAAAAADbs/trNfTwFy3hIRBBfjQTE-agK40cnw8UlGACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-29%2Bat%2B11.48.24.png" width="640" /></a></div><div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif; font-size: large;"><i>After:</i></span></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-qSh-Q8Snkag/XJYZ13M8-FI/AAAAAAAADY4/7G4UJJE0sEQR_b33RMG9wg9YlDXLLsAxgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B11.34.23.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="712" data-original-width="1128" height="402" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-qSh-Q8Snkag/XJYZ13M8-FI/AAAAAAAADY4/7G4UJJE0sEQR_b33RMG9wg9YlDXLLsAxgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B11.34.23.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Cropping into shots due to a lack of continuity&nbsp;</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Cropping the photo improves the continuity, but ideally, we should have had Luke's face in the corner. As I am making this part of the scene short and choppy, I imagine the fact that we are missing Luke's face won't be noticeable, as hopefully the action and quick cuts will take the concentration off the lack of continuity and onto the surgery scene. By thinking of the scene in a different way, if the idea of the audience being in Tim's mind with the quick jump cuts works well, then it may make sense to just see Tim as at this point in the scene we are focusing on how he believes he is being a good, successful vet. With this perspective, the fact that Luke isn't there works well.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">While I was&nbsp;editing this sequence together, Alex suggested seeing Sheila calling for Sooty in between&nbsp;seeing the build up to&nbsp;the&nbsp;surgery. This made sense as it's her who makes Tim slip and kill the dog, therefore, from the audience's point of view it may make more sense to see her beforehand to set up the idea of an elderly woman looking for her pet. This also allows me to extend the quick cuts, keeping the build up to the blood splatter at a good length and allows the pace of the film to stay the same throughout.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I followed the same method of using jump cuts with the new footage in the same way I used them in the first rough cut. This sequence looked a lot better purely for the fact that we captured better footage in the re-shoot. The surgery scene with the old footage was&nbsp;only made up of 6 shots, whereas this new sequence with the new footage is made from 9 shots. I&nbsp;believe that this has improved the pacing of the film and it is slightly longer which helps build the&nbsp;tension leading up to the blood splatter. The sequence could still be refined,&nbsp;however, I think I have used the shots&nbsp;correctly creating a successful and&nbsp;tension-building sequence.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xcbvJxsEWdA/XNAblAuB2_I/AAAAAAAAD3Y/e6SPy_Qa9CQEpFLQHiVbvyl9vf_wSDpKwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B12.32.48.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="877" data-original-width="1600" height="350" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xcbvJxsEWdA/XNAblAuB2_I/AAAAAAAAD3Y/e6SPy_Qa9CQEpFLQHiVbvyl9vf_wSDpKwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B12.32.48.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sequence of surgery scene in jump cuts</span></td></tr></tbody></table><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Comparison from Transitions to Major Project</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Discussing the idea of changing the pace of the film by using jump cuts led me onto reflecting back on the Transitions unit. The aim of creating another VET-MAN film in the Major Project unit was to try and improve the film we submitted for the Transitions unit. We liked the concept of the film and felt that we could do it again but improve it.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I am reflecting on the previous film and that we are creating a film with a similar comedic tone,</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;it may be beneficial for me to compare what I felt didn't work well in that film, so I can improve on it for this unit. I was the sole editor for the Transitions film but in this project I am one of the editors, however as I am creating the rough cut, I am in the&nbsp;same position within the edit role that I was previously. In the Transitions film I was unhappy with the surgery scene. W</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">e filmed everything separately like normal and like we have for this unit, but I knew that it would be down to the editing which would help build the tension and create the gory part of the vet butchering the dog. Obviously we had to pretend to kill the dog, therefore, I had to make this look real in the edit.</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;The sequence I am describing is shown below:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NB3o68X7t58?start=160" width="560"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The video starts at 2:40 which is the first time we see the vet prepping for the surgery, and although the video above continues, the actual surgery scenes ends at around 3:00. The sequence shown in the video above is what I was unhappy with the most. The main problem I felt with this sequence was that the timing didn't match the rest of the film. The film was only short in the first place, with the requirements being 2-3 minutes long, but I felt that the sequence showing the preparation of the surgery was very brief and then the rest of the sequence was made up of cutaways of the animals' owner with overlays of dialogue from the vet. This part of the film may have felt like it was over quite quickly because I was using jump cuts. Looking back at the film, I have learnt that jump cuts are ideal to build the tension however I need enough of them to maintain the pace of the film. The pace of the film may have also seemed quicker because this was the only time I used jump cuts. Due to the length of the film I only needed to use the jump cut technique once. There were also only a couple of shots of the surgery happening that I was able to use in the previous film until I had to cut away for the audience to hear the vet butchering the dog, which may have also added to the quickness of it.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">By re-watching the film, I have decided that I wanted to improve this with similar jump cuts to help build the tension for the blood splatter, but I want to use more of them to keep in time with the pace of the film. I believe that a part of the reason why I wasn't happy with the surgery scene in the previous film may be because of the smaller amount of coverage we had. If I had more shots to work from I may have been able to make the jump cuts go on for longer. I believe that jump cuts are ideal, but they just didn't quite work in the previous film.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Current edit of VET-MAN - prep for surgery scene:</span><br /><br /><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/r36wWTn3wls?start=300" width="560"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The short video above is my current edit of VET-MAN just after they hit the dog. The video starts at 5:00 where the surgery scene begins, similarly to the comparison video, and the surgery scene ends at around 5:25. This is only 5 seconds longer than the Transitions film but I believe that those 5 seconds make all the difference in terms of matching the pace of the rest of the film. I feel that we gained more coverage in these shoot days allowing me to use more jump cuts which fit with the pace of the film.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In addition to this, I believe that the jump cuts feel more natural here to build up the tension because I've used them in earlier in the film when Tim is looking through Tess's living room drawers. In the Transitions unit, I felt that the jump cuts were slightly out of place due to not using them more than once, whereas, I believe that I have tackled this in the current edit by using them more than once.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I&nbsp;created rough cut 3 after the re-shoot which happened to be of the surgery scene that I wasn't&nbsp;initially happy with.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">By watching back the Transitions film, I understand where I went wrong from the editors perspective and what I wanted to improve on - creating quick jumps cuts which don't speed up the film too much. I want the tension to build and then end appropriately on the blood splatter with the same timing as the rest of the film.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During this shoot we shot a lot more footage and&nbsp;focused a lot more on the surgery scene as this is such a vital part of the film. Since this has happened, I was able to create the sequence above (current edit of VET-MAN - prep for surgery scene), which includes a few more&nbsp;jump cuts, which was all that was needed, and I was able to split it up a bit by&nbsp;cutting away to Sheila looking for her dog. Although I used cutaways to the animals' owner in the Transitions film, the dialogue was on top of these shots which didn't help the quick paced scene, whereas in the current video, I prolonged the surgery scene entirely when I cut away to Sheila, and then cut back to the surgery scene after, lengthening it.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">By reviewing my most recent edit from this unit, it is clear that with more coverage I was able to create quick jump cuts, but the pace of the film still matches throughout.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-yjGF2JtNX1g/XJYPWl7AGkI/AAAAAAAADX0/Y-Mj1DOGip0VgcTCWAWrfHdUoIWaGkSkgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B10.49.30.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="764" data-original-width="882" height="554" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-yjGF2JtNX1g/XJYPWl7AGkI/AAAAAAAADX0/Y-Mj1DOGip0VgcTCWAWrfHdUoIWaGkSkgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B10.49.30.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Improving the dog hit scene</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The sequence after Sheila has walked away also needed work. We re-shot this as well in order to improve the amount of coverage we needed for the edit. In rough cut 1 and 2 this sequence is mainly made up of two shots, rather than cutting between the characters talking. Now we have re-shot and have more coverage, I am able to do quick cuts between the characters, highlighting their reactions. For example, Luke's reaction when Tim says the dog situation is all his fault. As you can see from the edit timeline below, there are quite a few cuts for a short section of the scene (about 30 seconds long).&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-5iqyS9d0kD8/XJYRDKYVE4I/AAAAAAAADYU/Wo4wNifilFcwOMc4s8y6UULv42BjAR7lgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B10.56.49.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1050" data-original-width="876" height="640" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-5iqyS9d0kD8/XJYRDKYVE4I/AAAAAAAADYU/Wo4wNifilFcwOMc4s8y6UULv42BjAR7lgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B10.56.49.png" width="532" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Improving the sequence after Sheila</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Importing the GVs into the edit</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The idea of getting the GVs was to be used with the voice overs we got previously. We got a lot of GVs and relatively long voice overs, which meant that they needed to be cut down quite a lot. I started with putting in the GVs to see which scenery looked the most aesthetic. I started with a couple of GVs in between scenes 6 and 7 to get the audience to the owl academy, with a voice over combination of the different clips we got on the voice over day, but this seemed to drag slightly and for a fast paced comedy, didn't fit very well.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To work around this, Alex suggested just using one clip of the van turning a corner and using the voiceover of Luke saying - "it's up here on the left". We originally had a longer conversation of Luke and Tim getting lost, however, we felt that it would be better left shorter for this scene transition and I cut the voice over and GV's apart from that one line and the one van shot. We can always add to it later in the fine cut, but for now it seemed to fit better. Now I have the GV in place with the small piece of dialogue, I can see how it helps the transition from Sheila's house to finding the owl academy. The other scene transitions just cut to black, but I believe this one adds to the story more. In addition to this, I didn't want each scene to end in black as the film would be cut into sections, I much prefer combining scenes with something as simple as watching the van drive to the next location. I understand that this can't happen with all the scene transitions but I am pleased with this transition in particular.</span><br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-7ds3NlKD444/XJYRE1BlnXI/AAAAAAAADYY/uZO5e_8qK4g-_s3eTq0UHWj2QL9DHLbfQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B10.56.57.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="600" data-original-width="1272" height="300" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-7ds3NlKD444/XJYRE1BlnXI/AAAAAAAADYY/uZO5e_8qK4g-_s3eTq0UHWj2QL9DHLbfQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-23%2Bat%2B10.56.57.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Adding in van GVs</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Using the voice overs</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As well as the voice over designed to transition from scene 6 and 7, I had to insert the other two voice over clips that we deliberately recorded. Starting with scene 2 when Tim drives the van off the drive, I knew we needed a short clip to fill the shot of the van. I expressed the idea of a shorter clip to Ed and Dan when they were in the sound booth, and they did just that. Once I picked a short line about the drugs I inserted it over the top of the van driving off the drive. However, as expected Tim getting into the reverse gear and then starting to move off the drive was quite dragged out, even with the voice over on top. I didn't expect him to reverse the van to fast due to having to watch his mirrors and for safety of the two of them even though we had a runner on hand to watch the traffic. As a result of the slow movement of the van, I liaised with Alex and we decided to cut the shot of them turning the engine on and reversing. Instead, I've cut from them noticing the drugs, putting their belts on and then I cut to a short GV of the van driving down the road, without a voice over. Surprisingly this worked better as the next scene is when Tim and Luke are driving around lost before hitting the dog. The story flows better with this sequence of shots, starting with Tim turning the engine on, then seeing the van driving around, to then cutting inside the van of them using the map on the phone for directions. Rather than seeing the van drive slowly off the drive to then cutting to insight the van when they're on a stretch of road. This also adds a better transition from scene 2 to 3 than just cutting to black. This means there's now two transitions that fit well together rather than cutting them all to black.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The final deliberate voice over clip we recorded is situated at the end of the film to run over the credits. As I explained in the <i>Voice Over Day </i>blog post, Alex and I liked the idea of ending with the ferret comment and then completely cutting the film and credits there. This was inevitable to be the final word, so as a result of this, I just had to make a shorter conversation between the voice over clips that makes sense. Getting the mix of clips to make sense was the most difficult bit I found because as the clips were improvised there was usually a word or sentence which leaded them onto thinking of the next line. For example, the ferret clip was essential to be included, but then I had to include the story leading up until this otherwise it wouldn't make sense. As a result of this, I had to include Luke's ex-girlfriend story to bring in the ferret and the iconic "did it end amicably" line. Before the ex-girlfriend line, they are talking about small animals, so it all has to make sense even though I wanted to cut between the voice over clips. In the end the chosen dialogue I cut together:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"So, where to next?"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"The dog thing didn't go particularly well"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"No, no"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"It was a minor speed bump"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"Speed bump!!!"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"No no I'm afraid that was not a good analogy, it was a minor hiccup... and the owl thing"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"Steer clear of dogs for now, and owls"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"Owl could have gone better....&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">So I'm thinking maybe something slower, or bigger, or less... wingy"&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"less wingy... what about a rabbit?"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"rabbits are good"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"point is small, rabbits, ferrets... my ex-girlfriend has a ferret"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"does she"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"yeah"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"is it sick?"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"It might be, we could check?"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"Yeah, yeah. Did it end amicably?"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"What the ferret?"</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I think this short story makes sense. There were a couple of lines I liked and wanted to keep in it, such as the - "it was a minor speed bump" - as this quite ironic as they bumped over the dog in the road, similarly to a speed bump. In one of the clips Ed says - "is it sick" - referring to another animal Dan brought up, but after this line he says - "can we make it sick?" and I really liked this line. It shows his thought process of 'oh the animal isn't sick but maybe we can do something about that'. The way in which he says it as well adds to the humour. He says it slowly - "can we.. make it.. sick?" - as if he knows its wrong but wants to see how Dan feels about it anyway. Unfortunately, I couldn't fit the second line of "can we make it sick" into the final voice over because the ferret joke was more important and Dan talks too closely together towards the end so I struggled to cut it up more. Nevertheless, the main part of the voice over that we wanted featured was the ferret line so we have a good place to finish the entire film. I showed Alex and he agreed that it makes sense and he was happy with it.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Solving the missing audio</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During the first rough cut, I realised that we had lost some audio&nbsp;from the owl academy shoot days. Fortunately, it wasn't much but it was from the owl punch scene which is an&nbsp;important part of the story. When Katie was editing the shots from the owl academy, she didn't do all of it and she didn't look over the audio so we didn't notice until I synced the audio after the shooting period. We believe that there was a connection problem with the boom and tascam as our sound assistant didn't notice anything was wrong with the audio from the headphones, and it still recorded despite not actually the recording sound. As a result of this, I decided to organise an ADR session during the time when Ed and Dan were due to come in for the voiceover day. I have explained the ADR session in a previous blog post, but we didn't realise the preparation that went into ADR, despite the research I did into it. Whenever we mentioned it to a lecturer they didn't mention the fact that we'd need to prep in advance and practice. In addition to this, I only researched into the actual process of the actor watching themselves and trying to recreate the dialogue with the same expressions, rather than the preparation needed to contain ADR successfully. Due to all of this, we decided that we would recreate the audio but I would edit it so we didn't see their mouths for the audio that we had lost. Then I could put in any piece of dialogue but as we aren't seeing their mouths move, it doesn't matter whether it matches or not.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The first part of audio that we lost was the comment Tim makes to Luke when they enter the academy. This wasn't actually in the script we used for filming (draft 8), it was decided on the day. As shown in the screenshot below, Tim turns to Luke and the audience would expect to hear some dialogue. However, unless I cut out their entrance, I needed something to go in when Tim leans in to talk to Luke. In addition to this, we also&nbsp;didn't get a close up of them, so the wide shot below is the one which needs to be used for their entrance. This felt odd as usually when someone talks, the camera is typically on the action with a close up. As a&nbsp;result of this, ideally, I would then cut to a 2-shot of Tim and Luke so we could hear what Tim said. However, as this shot wasn't written on the shot list we&nbsp;didn't record it, and on the shoot day I&nbsp;didn't think about it when we were getting the wide shot. When I realised we&nbsp;didn't have the coverage of the 2-shot, I&nbsp;liaised with Alex to see what he suggested. He said he&nbsp;preferred the shot on the wide as we are focusing on the owner, Mollie, and the&nbsp;distressed owl rather than their&nbsp;entrance. As Alex was happy with the shot, it just required a&nbsp;voiceover from Tim so we could hear what he says to Luke. As we are a distance away from Tim, it is not&nbsp;obvious what he says, and as a&nbsp;result of this, it&nbsp;didn't require ADR, just simply some dialogue. Due to this, on the voiceover day Alex asked Tim to say - "the game is a foot" - and I imported this onto the timeline.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Personally I&nbsp;believe that, that line of dialogue doesn't sound quite right. As the characters are further away than normal, I think the dialogue should be&nbsp;quieter than what it is on the current edit. The&nbsp;voiceover is quite clear and for me, this doesn't&nbsp;quite match the idea of them standing away from the camera. Tim also looks as if he&nbsp;could be whispering the line, which again means that the dialogue&nbsp;should be&nbsp;quieter. Alex was happy with the&nbsp;audio once I had put it in place, but I will pass this information onto Katie to see what she thinks, we also need to import some more atmos which may muffle the dialogue slightly to make more sense in the fact that Tim's voice should be quieter as he isn't the main focus of the shot.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-C5hplO896bo/XJlWJisl64I/AAAAAAAADZI/3AxMqub39lMGX97HT6P-2NNNIqXg5r4KwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.28.04.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1060" data-original-width="892" height="640" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-C5hplO896bo/XJlWJisl64I/AAAAAAAADZI/3AxMqub39lMGX97HT6P-2NNNIqXg5r4KwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.28.04.png" width="538" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Importing new dialogue&nbsp;</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During the owl punch scene and the build up to this, we only had complete audio for the wide shots and one close up shot of Mollie. Unfortunately, we didn't have the audio for Tim or Luke's close ups. In rough cut 1 and 2, I tried my best to use the wide shots as much as I could to reduce the amount of close ups due to the missing audio. However, there are some shots that needed the close ups, such as when Luke discovers that Tim has given the owl the wrong needle. As I explained previously, as long as the mouths aren't showing, it doesn't matter whether the dialogue syncs with the faces. As a result of this, on the re-shoot day we got Ed and Dan to recite their lines from the missing audio and I aimed to use the new dialogue over shots where we didn't see their mouths. Surprisingly worked well. I tried to cut back to Mollie's close ups where I could as we had this audio, this was ideal as Simon suggested as part of the feedback to cut to her more often to show her concern for the owl when Tim is injecting it. There is one section when Tim says - "there we go, that should've done the trick" - fortunately, we had Tim injecting the owl on a shot which was focused more on the distress of the owl, and Tim's face was slightly out of shot. I simply cropped the shot to take Tim completely out of it. This meant that I was able to use the dialogue we recorded on the re-shoot to replace the missing audio.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-iuo8NnF-Q1c/XMI7CpweY6I/AAAAAAAADlA/fWsIVXzxLyA_nE4nhbcM5FpCshvRSLNagCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-25%2Bat%2B23.55.31.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="643" data-original-width="1424" height="288" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-iuo8NnF-Q1c/XMI7CpweY6I/AAAAAAAADlA/fWsIVXzxLyA_nE4nhbcM5FpCshvRSLNagCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-25%2Bat%2B23.55.31.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">There was one&nbsp;shot where I&nbsp;couldn't work around the sync between dialogue and footage - when Luke realises Tim has&nbsp;given the owl the wrong needle and he is trying to get his attention. He says "Tim!!" twice and the first one is when we are watching Tim talking to Mollie, and we just hear Luke talk rather than see him. This is understandable as Tim is trying to&nbsp;ignore him which is why we are focusing on Tim and Mollie's&nbsp;conversation, however, Luke calls Tim again and I&nbsp;couldn't not focus on Luke again so I had to stay on Luke's close up. Fortunately, he only says "Tim" which is easier to sync than a sentence would be.&nbsp;I just had to ensure I had the word "Tim" as close as I could to look like Luke is saying it.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-tp3BRlomaW8/XMJB1Fs0IWI/AAAAAAAADlM/vJdBzsVUYmktYdZKGP73zMEwsmIdDFWFACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-26%2Bat%2B00.21.11.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="748" data-original-width="1528" height="312" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-tp3BRlomaW8/XMJB1Fs0IWI/AAAAAAAADlM/vJdBzsVUYmktYdZKGP73zMEwsmIdDFWFACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-26%2Bat%2B00.21.11.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The remaining shots which were missing audio I had to&nbsp;work around with cover ups. For example, the screenshot below is showing Luke putting the doctors bag on the table ready for Tim to get the needle out.&nbsp;While we are watching Luke move&nbsp;warily around the owl we are listening to some of Tim's dialogue.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HmBAmWqfCqc/XJlWjlOEzCI/AAAAAAAADZQ/UWrUS2KKhq8ZVJTNSEtmwWaEKn3B-BdlwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.30.11.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="956" data-original-width="834" height="640" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HmBAmWqfCqc/XJlWjlOEzCI/AAAAAAAADZQ/UWrUS2KKhq8ZVJTNSEtmwWaEKn3B-BdlwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.30.11.png" width="558" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Solving missing audio with cover ups&nbsp;</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Making the editing snappier</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 1 - Tim looking through drawers</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 2 - Cut Tim looking around the van</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 8 - making the meeting between Tim, Luke and Mollie quicker - shot reverse shot between Luke and the owl over the top of Tim and Mollie's&nbsp;conversation rather than&nbsp;in between&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-4ilsJsI3i8A/XJlYPmpb5lI/AAAAAAAADZw/_44V__hZEs8z_qwbO_OV5fuL3wvrkmrZACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.37.13.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="976" data-original-width="960" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-4ilsJsI3i8A/XJlYPmpb5lI/AAAAAAAADZw/_44V__hZEs8z_qwbO_OV5fuL3wvrkmrZACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.37.13.png" width="628" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Making scenes feel&nbsp;quicker to aid the comedy</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After I had synced and imported the new footage and&nbsp;audio onto the timeline, I went through the film from the beginning to see if there were any bits of audio or footage which cut too early or any that cut to black, preparing for the viewing with Beth and Simon.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I also finished sections of audio which were&nbsp;incomplete.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Atmos which needs to be found online is part of the fine cut as the rough cut is simply working with the recorded visuals and audio, however, we recorded some pub atmos in the The Bell Inn when we filmed there for the day. As a result of this, I put this sound on the timeline underneath the footage for inside the pub.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In scene 3 we aim to&nbsp;make the van look as if it's moving in the edit, as we shot this while the van was stationary. Katie has more knowledge than me about the track and motion effect and as a result of this, I felt it was best for her to apply this effect in the fine cut.&nbsp;However, to make good use of my time during the rough cut, I started the process of making the van look as if it was moving by creating an audio track of the van engine from inside the van. Initially, I was going to use an engine sound we recorded (from&nbsp;outside the van) and&nbsp;muffle it. It would have to be muffled&nbsp;because the sound of a van's engine doesn't sound the same from outside to&nbsp;inside the van, this is the same with any&nbsp;vehicle. As a result of this, it&nbsp;wouldn't be&nbsp;believable to use the sound of the van's engine from outside for the sound Tim and Luke would be hearing from the inside. Another option I had was to use the audio from the GoPro&nbsp;footage we got&nbsp;during the main shoot week, on the same day as performing the scene with the dog hit. Due to the lack of back seats, we were&nbsp;unable to have Katie film Tim and Luke from the back of the van. To work around this, we attached a GoPro to the dashboard of the van, without getting it in Tim's view of the road. Securing a camera to the inside of the van allows the van to be driven as normal and for everyone inside to be seated and belted while it's moving. I&nbsp;didn't use the GoPro&nbsp;footage in the edit as the footage wasn't great. In addition to this,&nbsp;because&nbsp;the camera was fixed the footage didn't quite match the rest of the handheld style we wanted. As a result of this, the audio from that footage was perfect to be used inside the van before they hit the dog because it was used when the van was moving and therefore, gives the sound of the inside of the van while moving.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Vans can be quite&nbsp;noisy&nbsp;inside due to&nbsp;commercial equipment needed for&nbsp;whatever&nbsp;business the van is being used for. I know this from personal&nbsp;experience from my dad's van. Whenever he turned a corner or changed speed his work tools hung on the inside would crash&nbsp;around in the back. Although having noise like this is more&nbsp;believable&nbsp; it would&nbsp;interrupt the dialogue and may take the focus off the characters in the scene. I felt that the focus of&nbsp;the&nbsp;characters was more&nbsp;important than having&nbsp;realistic noises from the van in this instance,&nbsp;especially as the&nbsp;characters are talking in this scene. From these reasons, I&nbsp;only used sections of the GoPro footage that were clean.&nbsp;Unfortunately, the audio&nbsp;wasn't clean for a large part at a time so I had to paste many&nbsp;sections of the audio together, creating one long piece of clean audio. If I hadn't cut around this audio track, the sound from the tools in the back of the van may have brought the quality of the film down. As a result of this, I am glad I spent the time gathering clean audio for this scene.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-swiiRUAxUqg/XJlXMlFa2SI/AAAAAAAADZc/WXyf2t28HJ0e7KpLRwDhxqbaZArfIUtSgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.31.46.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="972" data-original-width="986" height="630" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-swiiRUAxUqg/XJlXMlFa2SI/AAAAAAAADZc/WXyf2t28HJ0e7KpLRwDhxqbaZArfIUtSgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.31.46.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Starting the process of making the van feel as if it's moving</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As it can be seen from the screenshot above, I had to gather a lot of clean audio to create one audio track. In order to stop the change in pitch between each individual audio clip, I added a Constant Gain audio effect to the end of each clip. This allows the sound to stay the same across each individual clip. There is dialogue on top of this audio track as well, which will also hide any pitch changes in the van engine track. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Unfortunately we&nbsp;don't&nbsp;have a dog yet to film on the floor and in the side of the van. As we are currently struggling to find an&nbsp;obedient dog, I simply put in placeholders in order to signpost where the dog footage will be placed. We want to refer back to the dog a couple of times so the idea of running over a dog is more believable, therefore, I have put in two placeholders with the text 'dog' where our footage will eventually go.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qasJfjOUcf8/XJlXyOyU6BI/AAAAAAAADZk/bDIm94vEzgw8wr50PyEdPghVYXLlSgqcQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.35.34.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="986" data-original-width="856" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qasJfjOUcf8/XJlXyOyU6BI/AAAAAAAADZk/bDIm94vEzgw8wr50PyEdPghVYXLlSgqcQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-25%2Bat%2B22.35.34.png" width="554" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Placeholder for needed footage</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I included extra shots of Mark, Sheila, Tim and Luke in scene 12 (inside the pub) when Luke notices Sheila and Mark starts to walk over. I had previous feedback to focus more on Tim and his reaction to Mark walking over, however, before I added extra shots, I cut from Luke to Sheila and back to Luke while Mark walks over. I felt as if Tim needed to be involved there, so I added in Tim when he responds to Luke's "Tim" with "What?". After this I felt that I would be able to build the tension up until Tim faces Mark by adding further shots of the cast. As a result of this, I ended with a shot of Luke reacting to Tess saying his name - to Sheila noticing them - back to Luke saying "Tim" - back to Sheila pointing for Mark to walk up to Tim and Luke - to Tim responding to his name with "What?" - back to Luke saying "Sheila!" - to Tim saying "Sh*t" - back to&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Mark walking through the room - back to Tim&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">gulping his drink,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">zipping his top, saying&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"I'll deal with this"&nbsp;before facing up to Mark. By&nbsp;continuously cutting between the characters, I am able to build the tension up to Tim's comedic - "You're not Sheila!" - before he gets punched in the face.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In&nbsp;addition to these improvements on the edit, I also refined the&nbsp;continuity in places. Particularly, in scene 6 when Luke is running back to the van from Sheila's house. In the re-shoot we shot more coverage inside the van of Tim and Luke&nbsp;panicking, getting their belts on quickly and speeding away from Sheila's house, rather&nbsp;than keeping it as one complete take. In an early edit of rough cut 3, the&nbsp;continuity&nbsp;didn't add up with them&nbsp;putting their seat belts on, however, I corrected this by playing about with the time when I cut between both characters. Simple tasks like these, making sure the shots flow smoothly and the&nbsp;continuity&nbsp;isn't disrupted unless intentional allows the quality of the edit to improve. As the rough cut editor, I want to make sure all the footage is complete to the best of my ability before passing it onto Katie for the fine cut. Due to time&nbsp;constraints, Katie needs to concentrate on further refinement of the film, sound design and colour and not on jobs that I should be doing&nbsp;in the rough cut.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Alex and I decided to get rid of the hand signals in the night scene due to the footage being so dark it's actually quite hard to see what they are doing with their hands. By removing this footage, it also shortens the film which is what I am aiming towards.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I added in&nbsp;the voiceovers we got with our characters for Tim&nbsp;and Luke on the voiceover day. These were quite long with each recording being around 2 minutes long. This would be a very long time to sit and watch the van driving around just listening to some dialogue,&nbsp;therefore I picked out the best parts of the voiceover and joined these&nbsp;together to make sense. I placed the voiceover when we would see the van driving around looking for the owl academy, and I put a section of the voiceover at the end of the film for the credits. We aren't completely sure on music yet, but we know we don't want too much as our inspiration <i>The Thick Of It </i>doesn't have any music and we want to use the least amount as possible to fit with their tone. We have established that we might need some for the titles at the beginning and during the night scene, but that's it. As a result of this, Alex and I decided to have some of the voiceover for the credits and to end the film instead of music. When we had Ed and Dan in for the voiceover day they had some good stories and we wanted to use them in the film. Due to this, the credits were the best place to put them. The voiceover I have chosen to put as the end credits also finishes with a comedic line, which would be a good place to cut off to signify the end of the film. They discuss the animals they should see next and they get onto the topic of ferrets, Luke continues by saying his ex-girlfriend had a ferret and Tim suggests meeting it. He asks if it ended well (referring to the relationship, as this would established whether or not they could visit her ferret), but Luke asks "what, the ferret?". When we listened to him say this line, Ed, Dan, Alex and I all found this quite amusing and thought it would be a good place to end the film completely.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I changed the panning footage in the back of the van after Tim and Luke hit the dog. Instead of keeping both pans - from the side door to Luke and then from Luke to Tim - I decided to keep the one pan to Luke and then cut to Tim's reaction to the screwdrivers. I did this because Tim had a good reaction to Luke thinking he wanted screwdrivers to operate on the dog, and because of this the pan didn't quite get there in time to see it. As a result of this, I cut into the pan, but as I kept the first pan I was still replicating editing techniques that are used in our inspiration, <i>The Thick Of It.&nbsp;</i></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">While I was creating rough cut 3, Alex and I have established that we are happy with the footage and length of scenes 1 &amp; 2. Unless we&nbsp;receive anymore feedback and ideas in relation to cutting the scenes down slightly, which we will take onboard as the shorter, the better with comedy.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">It is clear that I am being successful in making the scenes shorter and choppier because the length of the whole film is getting shorter on each rough cut. Rough Cut 1 was timed at 20:20, and Rough Cut 2 was timed at 20:06. Rough Cut 3 is 16:33. Although the first two rough cuts were only slight changes I knew I was going in the correct direction. The third rough cut clearly shows this as it's a lot shorter.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I made a few final tweaks so the film was further towards complete before the next viewing. Ideally, I'd like to pass the edit onto Katie soon so she can work with the sound design to see if we need to conduct an ADR day. We are hoping not to due to availability and saving the budget, however, if the sound design doesn't work as well as we are hoping, I will not hesitate to organise an additional day to bring the cast in as the quality of the film is most important. However, whether I can pass the film on or not will be determined from the feedback I'll receive from Beth and Simon.<b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Rough Cut 3</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/r36wWTn3wls" width="711"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Beth's notes:<br />- work out how it could sustain - keeping the blood-stained costume on, think about future episodes, <br />- opening sequence a bit long - cut beginning down - 30 seconds/1 minute</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- first half is funnier<br />- fine tune the edit - sound, colour etc<br />- tighten up, sound, humour <br />- watch After Life - Ricky Gervais<br />- Get someone else to look at it for tightness - are we sitting here watching something we don't need to - help with the comedy - maybe time to pass it on to Katie - fresh mind<br /><br /> Simon's notes:<br />- sound in car park scene<br />- light passing the car<br />- tighter shot on “I’m VET-MAN”<br />- sound effects - e.g. punch noises, printer etc<br />- music on night scene?<br />- tighter in owl academy car park</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I found it&nbsp;beneficial to re-watch the previous film we created in the transitions unit in order to help me improve our current film. By reviewing the old film, I was able to pick out&nbsp;the sections that I was unhappy with the most (just the surgery scene in this case) and to find out where I went wrong with it and how I could improve my editing techniques for this project.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Using shots to cover dialogue in the owl punch scene actually worked quite well. There are no awkward cuts and it's not obvious that Luke's "Tim" isn't genuine. So far in the viewing, no one has noticed it and they all think it works well. As a result of this, it has shown that the ADR day wasn't essential. It would have helped with the wind in the owl academy car park scene, however, Katie is going to work on the audio for this scene. Fixing the missing audio is one problem towards the audio solved. Ideally, Katie will fix the background noise in scene 7 &amp; 9 and then I would agree with Katie and Alex that the ADR day was not needed.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Beth's feedback included the idea of getting someone to watch it objectively to see whether we are spending too much time on something that isn't very funny or doesn't add anything to the story. As Katie hasn't been involved with the rough cut, I believe that it may be time to pass it to her to work on the fine cut. If she comes across something which should have been done by me, such as rearranging shots, then I can take the edit back and amend bits that need it.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Cutting between characters in the pub worked really well I think. It helped to build the tension as the audience don't know what he's going to do, because the tension builds the audience may expect something big, and then they'll see Tim sat in the van with a bloody nose.</span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-48770657454296442942019-03-21T12:40:00.000+00:002019-05-09T23:02:21.685+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Re-shoot, GV Pickups & Dog Shot<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>RE-SHOOT - Scenes 4 &amp; 6</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The main aim for the re-shoot was to gain more coverage and better shots for the edit. We realised that some of the shots in scene 4 were overexposed and didn't match the quality of the shots we captured in other shoot days. Scene 6 also needed re-shooting as we didn't quite capture the idea of them speeding away in the van at the end. We were rushed on the first shoot day due to one of the cast members having to leave early. When organising the re-shoot it was my priority to make sure all the cast members were available for the day. Although I couldn't do anything about the cast member having to leave early on the first shoot day, I wanted to make sure we had everyone all day for the re-shoot. By doing this we will be able to take the time to get the best shots possible.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Cast</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim Stewart - <i>Ed Allenby</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Luke Lucas - <i>Daniel Hemsley&nbsp;</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sheila Hodges - <i>Susan Baskerville</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Crew</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Producer - Melissa</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director - Alex</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director of photography - Katie</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sound&nbsp;assistant - Aidan Robinson-Jones</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Runner - Megan Liddell</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Make-up artist - Bethany Ashby</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">At the last minute I got a friend on board to be a runner for us. This job doesn't require a lot of filming knowledge as we only needed her to stand by the road and watch for traffic as we did in the first shoot week.&nbsp;</span>Again, I helped watch for traffic when it was needed. I also wanted to act just as professionally as I did the first time, meaning that just because we were safe the first time doesn't mean we don't have to be safe the second time. Beth continued with the same job as she took on in the first shoot day. She was on hand to top up the blood on Tim's face and hands. Harriet was also taking on the same job role. She made sure the face cat was in the correct place, as we changed the location. Instead of panning across the road and under the front gate, we placed the cat just off the side of the road under a car. This meant that Katie didn't have to concentrate on panning across the road, but instead just in a diagonal direction downwards. I believe this was more suitable as we didn't waste time trying to pan across the road, instead we got to the punchline quicker of the 'dead' cat peacefully sleeping under a nearby car. Along with this, Harriet made sure the screwdrivers, doctors bag and stethoscope was in place. If these weren't in the correct places, Dan would have struggled to complete the scene.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>SCENE 4</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 4 consisted of the blood splatter sequence, which is what we wanted to improve on by the end of the re-shoot day. We decided to re-shoot the whole scene as there were more problems with the initial footage. Some of the Sheila's shots were over exposed which Katie&nbsp;didn't like the look of and wanted to improve. The weather was also quite bright and sunny, which&nbsp;usually would be fine,&nbsp;however, after working on the edit, I realised that this day was the sunniest day and therefore, the shots&nbsp;don't quite fit in with the surrounding scenes. We have a bit of sunlight approaching into the shots in the final scene, however I had amended this in the edit by bringing the sunlight in gradually. Due to&nbsp;having scene 4 and 6 in the sun but having scene 2 / 3 and scene 7 and 8 with a&nbsp;dull grey sky, the&nbsp;continuity didn't quite match up. I wasn't able to gradually bring the&nbsp;sunlight in with these scenes either. As a&nbsp;result of these&nbsp;additional issues, we decided re-shooting the whole scene would be the best thing to do. If I&nbsp;found out&nbsp;in the edit that we&nbsp;preferred a shot we captured in the first shoot week, I may be able to use this. With a bit of&nbsp;colour correcting we may be&nbsp;able to get it to match the new footage. It is unlikely that I will want to use an old shot as we had a successful re-shoot day,&nbsp;however, I have that option if I need it.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Props&nbsp;</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props needed for the scene:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Fake blood</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Syringe / scalpel&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Screwdrivers</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Stethoscope</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Mask</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Gloves</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We were able to use all the props from the first shoot week as they were all in good condition. In terms of the items that got covered in blood, such as the gloves, mask and scalpel, we had a box full of masks and gloves and we just cleaned the scalpel ready for the day.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-dnpk_eIByrM/XLy82KqKAwI/AAAAAAAADiM/nJertOmFyIs3CZnIyFs-psPTsX2vFIHYwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-21%2Bat%2B19.55.47.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="686" data-original-width="1372" height="320" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-dnpk_eIByrM/XLy82KqKAwI/AAAAAAAADiM/nJertOmFyIs3CZnIyFs-psPTsX2vFIHYwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-21%2Bat%2B19.55.47.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shooting the surgery scene (left), shooting Sheila's wide (right)</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>SCENE 6</b></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 6 is a short scene consisting of Luke running back from Sheila's house. In the&nbsp;previous footage, the get-away from Tim&nbsp;isn't very quick. In the script, we paint the idea that Luke is trying to get away quickly with his run towards the van, but then we slow down when Tim starts the engine, checks his mirrors and drives off. I understand that pulling&nbsp;away&nbsp;in a vehicle requires checks to ensure it's safe before doing so, and as a&nbsp;result of this, I get that it must have been&nbsp;difficult to pull away quickly when Tim needed to check the&nbsp;mirrors and the front to&nbsp;make sure it was clear to move. However, as we have the runner on board they are part of the reason as to why we can pull&nbsp;away quicker in the van. The runner kept their eye on the road which gave Tim the confidence to pull away quicker. We tried this take a couple of different ways. We started with the van engine on, this idea came about before the shoot day. Ideally if the engine is already on we shouldn't need to spend time turning the ignition and then the engine on when Tim is trying to make a quick get-away. This worked well, however, we also tried it the way we did the first time where Tim had to turn the engine on. We took this opportunity to get more coverage for this short scene as well. Prior to the re-shoot day, we only had this scene in one take of Luke running down the road to the van, and then watching Tim drive it away before panning to the sleeping cat. This time we shot the characters from the inside of the van on both sides. We wanted to give off the idea of panic and hurry as they try to drive away.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props</span></b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props needed for the scene:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Fake cat</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Vet van</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Fortunately, the cat was in good condition from the first shoot day. The cat was also suitable for what we wanted so there was no need to change it in preparation for the re-shoot. This saved some of the budget as I&nbsp;didn't have to&nbsp;buy another one.</span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Costume</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim - scrubs, black hoodie</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Luke - grey hoodie, green top, jeans, green parka coat</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sheila - trousers, purple top, pink cardigan</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Costume was the exact same as the first shoot day. However, some items of clothing, Sheila's pink cardigan and Luke's grey hoodie had a blood stained hand print on the shoulder. Fortunately, the fake blood came off in the&nbsp;wash and&nbsp;they were as good as new. This saved money in the budget as I could re-use the clothes rather than buying new ones. This was also ideal&nbsp;because it had been nearly a month&nbsp;between the main shoot week and re-shoot so I couldn't&nbsp;guarantee the cardigan and hoodie would still be sold in the shop. If the blood hadn't come out in the wash and the fashion had changed in the shop then we would have&nbsp;struggled to find the same&nbsp;clothing elsewhere.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Location</b></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We were&nbsp;happy with the road in Margate that we used in the shoot week, so we were eager to use it again.&nbsp;Again, I contacted the Kent Film Office and gained permission to film on the road. As I said previously when I was prepping the re-shoot, I had looked back at the church timetable and the area was quite clear and was only busy during times in which we wouldn't be in the middle of filming. This is evident in blog post -&nbsp;<i>Prepping the re-shoot, pickups, Voice O</i></span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">ver Day, with ADR Research.&nbsp;</i><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On the re-shoot day, as I predicted we had no problems with any&nbsp;members of public or residents. I believe that the second letter I posted through the residents' doors gave all the information they needed for the day. It was slightly busier around the church than it was on the first shoot day,&nbsp;however, like I said previously, this was during the times that we weren't deep into filming.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Creative control</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To follow my creative side of producing, I printed off the shot list again and ticked off each shot as we went through the day. I wanted to act as professionally as I did the first time, so it was essential for me to keep track of both the shot list and production schedule as we progressed throughout the day. As we have already shot these scenes once I believed that it would be a straight forward shoot day, and fortunately it was. I tried to make sure the initial vision for the film was realised through the shots we had originally planned, however, as we had already done this shoot, we knew what we liked and what we didn't like about the first shoot day. The re-shoot was mainly about capturing the same shots but doing them again to improve them. We also aimed to get more coverage. We wanted the re-shoot to resemble the first shoot but with some improvements, so as a result of this, I took the same shot list as before, the same one Katie was working off, to ensure our original vision was still coming across in the new footage.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I had started the edit, I was able to think properly as an editor during the re-shoot. I found it difficult to sync the sound of the surgery scene without the clapperboard, so I reminded Alex to use the board on this occasion, making the syncing easier once I come to the edit and less time-consuming than before. It was mainly when Tim put his gloves on as this was a constant squeaking sound, so I was adamant that they used the clapperboard for this shot.</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I was trying to keep in the mind set of the editor during the re-shoot day and because of this I noticed a continuity error. The new blood splatter hit Ed's face, which was ideal for scene 4, however once he drives off and arrives at the academy, the blood has disappeared. I suggested finding a way to show him wiping his face which would then make sense once he leaves the van in the next scene with a clean face. I had face wipes with me on the re-shoot day for Ed to clean his face anyway, so we decided to incorporate this into the scene. As a result of this, we finished the scene by capturing a close up of Ed getting into the van, wiping his face, then starting the engine and driving off.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-x-gsPudiIO4/XMl29qJCXqI/AAAAAAAADs4/7G9q_On29y06P9n2dgFMdpB2TS8ybnZKACLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_2254.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1075" data-original-width="1600" height="428" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-x-gsPudiIO4/XMl29qJCXqI/AAAAAAAADs4/7G9q_On29y06P9n2dgFMdpB2TS8ybnZKACLcBGAs/s640/IMG_2254.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for re-shoot, scene 4</span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1__6nXhBfZE/XMl3EbY8TJI/AAAAAAAADs8/m1m08WlalFM7LeJMYv8Ov5RqOy4GOFW3gCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_8451.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1013" data-original-width="1600" height="404" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1__6nXhBfZE/XMl3EbY8TJI/AAAAAAAADs8/m1m08WlalFM7LeJMYv8Ov5RqOy4GOFW3gCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_8451.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for re-shoot, scene 6</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; margin-left: 1em; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7Jvi5rexSkA/XMwBAB0RAsI/AAAAAAAADwM/aB7eUDMfkBEHu-lZXsoMlZJxis0PJYj0QCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-03%2Bat%2B09.50.54.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1096" data-original-width="342" height="640" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7Jvi5rexSkA/XMwBAB0RAsI/AAAAAAAADwM/aB7eUDMfkBEHu-lZXsoMlZJxis0PJYj0QCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-03%2Bat%2B09.50.54.png" width="198" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">RE-SHOOT schedule</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We started the day by shooting the most complex scene in the re-shoot which is scene 4. This scene consists of Tim attempting to perform surgery on the dog, before getting&nbsp;distracted by Sheila. This scene was rushed&nbsp;in the first shoot&nbsp;week and therefore, needed to be re-shot.&nbsp;Only re-shooting the two scenes rather than all four scenes we filmed on this day initially, means that I was able spread out the two scenes throughout the day giving us more time to spend on them. With this in mind, I&nbsp;scheduled scene 4 from 10:00 until lunch, and then scene 6 from 14:00. Alex previously&nbsp;mentioned getting Tim and Luke to do a bit more voice over&nbsp;while we had them together on this shoot day. As we only had the two scenes to shoot, I was expecting us to finish slightly earlier, which would be a good opportunity to do the voice over at the end. I&nbsp;think it may be more ideal to do it on location rather than&nbsp;in a sound booth, as there's more atmos to the location voice over. In a booth the&nbsp;dialogue is so clear, it almost doesn't fit right unless we add atmos over the top. Due to this, we&nbsp;wanted to get a bit of voice over in on location. We have lost audio on the owl academy location from shoot day 1, which we would like to try and replicate here due to the ADR day not going quite to plan.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On the&nbsp;day, we re-shot scene 4 up until lunch as scheduled, but fortunately, we finished shooting scene 6 slightly earlier than 16:00 as I had predicted and we recorded a bit of the&nbsp;missing dialogue. I had liaised with Alex before the re-shoot when he explained about recording the missing dialogue. I agreed and said that instead of doing ADR, we could just&nbsp;record the&nbsp;dialogue so I&nbsp;have the clips and I&nbsp;will play about with the edit to try and chose&nbsp;specific shots that don't show the characters faces when they're talking. By doing this, I will be able to add in the&nbsp;dialogue from today without concerning myself with the sync with their mouths. If this works then we would have solved the missing dialogue problem, if it doesn't than I will schedule a proper ADR day and set days beforehand to sit down with Ferg to practice, making myself fully prepared for the day.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We recorded the&nbsp;dialogue and still&nbsp;managed to wrap at 16:00&nbsp;which made a successful re-shoot day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What went well</b></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- </span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">It was beneficial for me to have already started the edit when we came to re-shooting as I was able to think properly as an editor. This was challenging in the initial shoot week as I&nbsp;hadn't seen it altogether at that point. As I am doing&nbsp;the rough cut, I was able to suggest things that will&nbsp;make my job easier when I get back into the edit room,&nbsp;such as using the clapperboard on the surgery shots. I was also able to think back to the edit and suggest any extra shots I think the film could do with.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The blood splatter went&nbsp;really well this time. We brought a new litre bottle of fake blood so it was a deep shade of red and we had enough to fill the spray bottle with, giving us a big splatter on Tim's face. Similarly to to the first shoot day, Beth finished Tim's hands off with the blood, completing the look.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We improved from the first set of footage we captured which was the aim of the re-shoot. The shots were clearer and less over-exposed. I remember in particular during the first shoot week, we had a car moving in the background of Sheila's close up, however as we were losing her early on we didn't have the time to re-do it.&nbsp;Fortunately, Sue was able to come for the whole day on the re-shoot. Getting the actors to Margate for the whole day was my priority when arranging the re-shoot so we could make the&nbsp;most of it and improve the two scenes. I believe I achieved by getting the cast in for the whole day. This led to a successful re-shoot.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Although we re-shot these scenes, we kept to our original plans but just improved them slightly. I believe that having the original shot list helped this.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What&nbsp;didn't go so well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I would have been ideal for the first shoot day to have been as successful as this one was. Apart from having to stop every now and then for passing public, this re-shoot was near perfect and we were very happy with the quality of the shots that we captured.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What did I learn</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- It takes time to capture the perfect scene. Knowing we had all cast members for the whole day meant that we had enough time to go over shots multiple times. We struggled with this on the first shoot day as Sue had to go so early on. We were fortunate that we got everything we needed and in the best quality (blood splatter) on this re-shoot day otherwise I may had to re-schedule another which wouldn't have been ideal on the budget.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>GV PICKUPS</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Cast</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">No cast required</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Crew</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Producer - Melissa&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director - Alex</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director of Photography - Katie</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Runner - Aidan Robinson-Jones</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Location</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Having GVs of the Vet Van was first suggested by Simon, and Alex and I quite liked the idea. We agreed that it may help the story progress from one location to the other. It was also a simple idea which could be created quite quickly and easily. We didn't need any cast involved as we would only be filming the van driving. As this would be at the usual speed limit of 30mph, the van would pass the camera at some speed so we shouldn't be able to see anyone in the seats. In addition to this, we aimed to shoot the back side of the van more than the front so it wasn't obvious as to who was in the front two seats. On the shoot day we found that we were correct in thinking the van would pass the camera quite fast so we worked around&nbsp;this by capturing a couple of pans. I realised that I couldn't advise Alex to drive slower for the camera as he would need to keep with the general&nbsp;speed of the other road users as driving purposefully slower may have become a hazard.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props needed:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Vet Van</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The only prop needed for this shoot was the van.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Creative control</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I liaised with Katie before the GV pickup day to see how she was going to shoot the van. She explained that she didn't need a shot list as we only had to capture the van moving a couple of times. Although I agreed at the fact that we only needed to shoot the van. I wanted to create a small list to make sure we had all the angles we needed. Then I could take this with me and check that we've got all of these angles for me to work with in the edit. As I am currently creating the third rough cut, I have an idea of were these GVs can go and the type of shots that would fit in well with the rest of the film. For example, we want to shoot quite shots, rather than watching the van drive along a long road and then finally pass the camera. I will be focusing on the choppier shots, which get the van to the camera quicker.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- 3x straight roads</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- 3x corners</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- 2x front of van</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- 4x back of van</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ybNDSjCDWcw/XMwOGXEtK8I/AAAAAAAADwY/5yWZDrgYjHsIcXou46US8BqRonzEpK50wCEwYBhgL/s1600/455acad15bb64d43a869504208446271.MOV" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="240" data-original-width="320" height="400" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ybNDSjCDWcw/XMwOGXEtK8I/AAAAAAAADwY/5yWZDrgYjHsIcXou46US8BqRonzEpK50wCEwYBhgL/s400/455acad15bb64d43a869504208446271.MOV" width="223" /></a><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Even if we get a couple&nbsp;of each of these shots I will be pleased. I think we need a variety of the shots to gain more coverage for the edit.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">While we were&nbsp;conducting the GV pickups I decided to upload a story to the VET-MAN Instagram page. I created a&nbsp;boomerang video of the van driving along the road and added a countdown until the start of May. I did it for the&nbsp;beginning of may&nbsp;because we haven't set a release date just&nbsp;yet so I&nbsp;didn't want to put one up for our followers to see. I added the words - 'wonder&nbsp;where we're off to? Find out in May!!'. The idea of&nbsp;the post was to tease a section of the&nbsp;story of VET-MAN. I wanted our followers to see that we were working on the&nbsp;production of the&nbsp;film at that point of the day. It also might give off the idea that the van is&nbsp;driving somewhere in the country, and our followers could try and look out for it.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What went well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I believe we got a variety of coverage of the van driving around. I made sure we got a number of shots from the angles I had noted down - corners, straight roads, front and back shots. I was correct in thinking that we didn't need a sound assistant as we were able to attach the microphone to the top of the camera. This saved time and budget which benefits our project well.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We had no problems out on the road with the equipment. The roads and pavements were quiet as we filmed in the middle of the day when most people are at work which was beneficial for us. We wanted the GVs to focus on the van driving around and this may not have been the case if we had other cars driving in front of the van or behind it.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We used the safe areas for the van. Alex was able to pull over in the pub car park for us to talk to him about the shots. He was also able to pull over in the street parking safely. We all wore high visibility jackets, especially as we were only a small crew out on location, we felt it was necessary to be highly visible as we have done at each location during this project.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What&nbsp;didn't go so well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We didn't come across any problems during the shoot. It was simple and short, mainly focusing on the van. I made sure we captured different angles of the van driving and I am eager to put these into the edit to see how they transform the piece.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: -webkit-standard;"><br /></span></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: -webkit-standard;"><br /></span></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>DOG SHOT - Scene 4</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In one of our previous edit reviews, we were advised to film a dog laying in the road and&nbsp;possibility in the back of the van.&nbsp;Initially, we&nbsp;believed that this would be&nbsp;extremely difficult to capture due to&nbsp;the idea of trying to get a dog to lay still for an amount of time. We asked around for anyone who had an&nbsp;obedient dog, as we would struggle further if the dog we chose was really energetic and&nbsp;uncontrollable. I knew plenty of dogs but they are all small,&nbsp;energetic animals that would struggle to lay still.&nbsp;Eventually, one of Alex's friends allowed us to use his dog, Barney. Barney is more obedient than the other dogs we considered but&nbsp;obviously with new people around him, it was inevitable that he was going to be very excited. We waited until he had calmed down before we started attempting to film him. Having his owner, Dan, involved made the process easier as he could control the dog. We&nbsp;weren't at the location for long, but as we only had the one shot to capture, it seemed like we were there for a little while.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Cast&nbsp;</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">No cast required</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Crew</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Producer - Melissa</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director - Alex</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director of&nbsp;photography - Katie</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Owner &amp; dog - Dan &amp; Barney</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Location</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The&nbsp;location worked really well. The road wasn't busy as we filmed during the day when most people are at work. We also filmed in a residential area rather than a main road, due to the business of vehicles. This&nbsp;helped&nbsp;towards the health and safety aspect of capturing this shot. As it was only the one or two shots we needed, I stood on the opposite side of the road watching for traffic. It seemed unnecessary to get more crew involved with this shoot as we only wanted the one or two shots.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Creative control</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I liaised with Katie before this shoot day to find out the details of the dog shoot. We agreed that it may only be the one shot we will be able to capture of the dog on&nbsp;the ground. Due to the size of the van, we may not be able to fit the dog, owner and Katie in&nbsp;such a small space in the door&nbsp;opening. She&nbsp;explained that she wasn't going to use a shot list for these shots either as it was only the couple of shots that we needed. As Barney was inevitably excited, it proved difficult to get him to lay still even after settling&nbsp;down with him. He would lay down nicely, but it just wasn't long enough for a good take. After a few attempts, we&nbsp;tried to film the animal in&nbsp;slow motion. This would allow us to have a longer shot of the dog laying still. This worked a lot better and the time in which Dan's hands left the frame to when the dog started moving again was a considerable amount. Long enough for us to have a good length take of the dog on the ground.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As predicted we only managed to capture the one shot of the dog. Due to only getting the one shot, I&nbsp;didn't need a shot list to follow. As long as we captured an&nbsp;appropriate take of the shot&nbsp;that was useable for the edit, then we were successful, which we did.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What went well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- After a difficult start, we&nbsp;managed&nbsp;to get the shot captured which we were happy with as it is a vital part of the story. It also builds&nbsp;on the believability of the film, that we can&nbsp;actually see a dog laying on the floor as if it had been hit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What&nbsp;didn't go so well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- When the idea of getting&nbsp;the dog shot first came around, we</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;discussed the idea of getting two shots of the dog, one in the road and one in the side of the van.&nbsp;However, once we got to the shoot day it became apparent that we were only&nbsp;going to be&nbsp;able to get the one&nbsp;shot of the dog on the ground. It was&nbsp;difficult to get the dog in the van and&nbsp;laying down still with room for both Dan, to control the dog, and Katie to film. It would have been ideal to get a&nbsp;second shot of the dog in the van purely for believability. The viewer would have really believed we had hit a dog if we could include a couple&nbsp;of shots of him in the film.&nbsp;However, due to the difficulty of getting the shot in the van, we could only capture the one shot.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What did I learn</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Although not realising that we needed the dog shot wasn't just my problem, I have learnt that when something is written in the script, the film needs to show it. If I had&nbsp;realised this, I may had suggested to Alex about changing the script slightly so it doesn't explain that we actually see a dog hurt on the floor. For future jobs / clients, I have learnt to&nbsp;deliver exactly what is detailed in the script to avoid disappointment / re-shoots. &nbsp;</span>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-91464128630575613752019-03-13T15:17:00.000+00:002019-05-09T23:01:29.273+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Voice Over Day <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I have created and used a&nbsp;voice over in a couple of my past projects, however, the only time I recorded voice over professionally was in the Professional Practice unit. The film I created for this unit&nbsp;consisted of an explanation about a tool from The&nbsp;Guildhall Museum, and the only way I could build the explanation into it was with a voice over detailing the research I had found about the tool.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I layered the voice over on top of shots of the tool to create an educational and informational video. This film required a voice over&nbsp;because there wasn't any presenters to tell the story of the tool. It was more of a descriptive video rather than a&nbsp;standard genre of drama, comedy or thriller which usually involve actors playing different characters. Due to this, VET-MAN&nbsp;wasn't the type of film to need a voice over at the&nbsp;beginning. We wanted a few characters to act the parts and say their lines. The idea of the voice over simply came from thinking of how to cover extra shots and&nbsp;how&nbsp;to transition from one scene to another.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I haven't had a lot of experience within voice overs, I decided to research into the use of them in&nbsp;character based films, such as comedies, dramas etc as I am confident that the&nbsp;voice overs would be used&nbsp;differently throughout each genre. I want to make sure we are using&nbsp;voice overs appropriately in our comedy. Throughout my research I found that&nbsp;films use&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"voice overs to provide quick exposition, tell stories, narrate, and provide an intimate look into the mind of a character"&nbsp;(Laughman, n/d). Looking at this, I think that the voice overs we need to add to the edit are to tell the story, and to possibly narrate the story. We need a couple of lines to help transition from one scene to another, this would be to help tell the story and explain&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">how we got from one scene to another.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Voice overs can also&nbsp;be used to "talk about events as they happen on screen" (Laughman, n/d). We have planned to get some GVs of the&nbsp;van&nbsp;driving&nbsp;around&nbsp;which we think would combined nicely with a couple of lines of dialogue. By using the voice over here, we would have Tim explain why they're driving around and where they are heading. This would show him talking about&nbsp;the&nbsp;event that is&nbsp;happening&nbsp;on the screen. A benefit of using voicer over is that it can be played "whenever it is convenient, and the audience know that it is being spoken to and by whom" (Laughman, n/d). As we are planning on using the first voice over at the end of the&nbsp;second scene, we would have given the audience 4 minutes and 55 seconds to&nbsp;establish&nbsp;who's voice is&nbsp;who's between the main two&nbsp;characters (based on the timings of rough cut 2 - this will become shorter the more refined the film becomes), which for a short film, is a substantial amount of time.</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>VOICE OVER DAY</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Cast</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim Stewart -<i> Ed Allenby</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Luke Lucas - <i>Daniel Hemsley</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Crew&nbsp;</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Producer / editor - Melissa</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Writer / director - Alex<i>&nbsp;&nbsp;</i></span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</i><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</i><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During the edit, we have a couple of transitions between scenes and a few shots where we are just watching the&nbsp;van. Instead of cutting these shots,&nbsp;Alex suggested getting a few improvisation dialogue clips from our two main characters to put over the&nbsp;shots of the van. I may also be able to put these elsewhere in the edit to help tell the story.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Q4o2G_Ktma4/XMWbcFhQyLI/AAAAAAAADrA/Oq0EtZKpXikaLqQvw33qQwSHfmKZYFDogCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_3860.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Q4o2G_Ktma4/XMWbcFhQyLI/AAAAAAAADrA/Oq0EtZKpXikaLqQvw33qQwSHfmKZYFDogCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_3860.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Voiceover day with Alex, Ed 'Tim' and Dan 'Luke'</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Although I was working as the editor on the voice over day by working on the computer to record and save their dialogue. I had to think in the mindset of a producer as well, by making sure we recorded all the voice overs that know we definitely needed. I liaised with Alex prior to the day to work out what scenes exactly we needed the voice over for and I took a note of them. With this, I was able to tick off each scene after Ed and Dan created a few different stories for each one. This method was the one I used to make sure we got all the shots listed on the shoot days. As this worked, I felt it would be best to use the same method for the voice over day.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The scenes I noted down where we definitely needed voice overs for were:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Scene 2 - when Tim reverses the van off the drive</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Scenes 6 - 7 - when Tim and Luke are driving from Sheila's house to The Kent Owl Academy</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Scene 13 - when Tim drives the van out&nbsp;of The Bell Inn car park</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We see the van driving away at the end of scene 2. This is the first time that Tim has seen the van and the slogan is revealed. As the editor, I&nbsp;have the opportunity to simply cut the shot of the van driving off the drive, however, I wanted to see if I could work in a comedic voice over clip before considering cutting it. As VET-MAN is a comedy the editing needs to be&nbsp;sharp and quick in&nbsp;order to build on the humour. As we have a&nbsp;relatively long time within the post-production stage, this is the opportunity to try the voice over and if it still feels too long and not in time with the rest of the snappy editing, then I will return to my first idea of cutting the van driving off the drive.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">There was no script for the voice over day, we wanted Ed and Dan to improvise a couple of stories for us. During the shoot days it was obvious that the pair got along and would make each other laugh regularly with odd comments. When we reviewed the GoPro footage we took on shoot day 3, we noticed that as Ed was turning the van round to attempt the emergency stop as if he had just hit the dog, both Ed and Dan decided to create a little improvised sketch. Due to the van only having two seats, when we wanted to film Ed driving, there could only be those two sat in the van. As a result of this, we didn't realise the footage existed until I was reviewing the footage for the rough cut. From then, Alex and I were confident that we could get a couple of good improvised stories from them both to use in the film.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We welcomed them into the studios on the voice over day and explained what we wanted from them. Remembering my research into ADR and how some actors struggle to stand in an empty room and immediately get back into character, we spoke to them first to get them comfortable around us again and showed them the latest edit of the film (rough cut 2) to try and help them get back into their character. Although this research was about ADR, Ed and Dan would both need to be back into their character for the voice over as well. In order to get the voice level and articulation correct, I would prep them in the same way whether we started with voice over or ADR first.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The shoot week ended two weeks prior to&nbsp;the voiceover day so I fully understood the pressure of trying to get back into the mindset of their characters. Especially if they have been working on other projects within these two weeks. However, once we had spoke to them for a bit and&nbsp;showed them the&nbsp;current edit, it&nbsp;didn't take long for them to get back into their characters.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We left the story ideas open to both of them. Alex and I were interested in&nbsp;where they would take each story. We explained at which part of the film we wanted the voice overs to go. For example, for the voice over to be used when Tim drives the van off the drive in scene 2, we explained that the conversation could be about the drugs that have just been discovered in the glove compartment. However, the conversation also could have gone in the direction of Tim explaining where they were heading to. Alex and I had already thought about having that particular discussion after the dog hit when they were on their way to the owl academy. As a result of this, we advised Ed and Dan to create a line or two about the drugs. I felt that this section of dialogue needed to be short instead of a whole conversation because I don't really want to stay on the van leaving the drive for too long. Ideally, I'd like to cut as the van gets onto the road from the drive which doesn't leave a lot of room for a lot of dialogue.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The voice over clip we got from them is below:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/16ScbhQ3qlahYMlWfxVu05xCl7ZN99T1I/view" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">ED_17</span></a></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As Ed and Dan knew we wanted a short line, they just kept coming up with quick jokes on the one recording which explains the silent gaps. I liked the lines they were coming out with, even if I just used Tim's - "what did you say your uncle did again" - line, this would be a good way to relate back to the drugs.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I said previously, w</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">e were trying to find a way to make the story flow from the road in Margate (scene 6) to the owl academy (scene 7) rather than for Tim and Luke to just arrive at the academy. This seemed like a good opportunity for another voice over. I found research to support this as the&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">voice over "provides a direct line between the characters and the audience, which can be used to better tell the story that the filmmaker wants told" (Laughman, n/d). By&nbsp;simply adding in a voice over of Tim explaining where they are&nbsp;going next, can inform the audience of what's happening&nbsp;in between scenes 6 and 7. Instead of changing shots around in the edit and trying to&nbsp;make it complicated, by adding in a voice over of Tim&nbsp;explaining that&nbsp;they are going to the academy makes the next part of the story a lot clearer.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As a result of this, we asked Ed and Dan to create a story surrounding the idea of heading for the Kent Owl Academy next. Getting a transition to with the academy&nbsp;originated from Simon's feedback, where he suggested getting Tim and Luke to drive the van and then they see the sign for the owl academy so they serve and pull into the entrance. We liked the idea but felt it was slightly unachievable due to the road in which the owl academy is situated on. Alex suggested trying to mask The Kent Owl Academy sign onto a road sign on a quieter road and then driving the van round that corner instead. As we haven't shot the GV's yet, Alex and I felt it would be best to get some voice overs to go on top of the GV's in case we can't mask the sign onto a road sign. Although it sounds like a last resort, I think getting their voice overs on top of the van GV's may actually look quite effective. I made sure we got the voice overs that we had planned by the end of the day to cover each idea I needed to try in the next edit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">They tried the voice over a couple of different times, one started as soon as they sped off away from Sheila's house so Luke is out of breath from running back. This scenario is below:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MBY3mrByhm-bLdkssbb26ROTMm-OplDm/view" target="_blank">Improv 1</a></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1n59kHkdpu1x9f7VyyaVtOhR_RuGCqskK/view" target="_blank">Improv 2</a></span><br /><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1l1AZSy0Lzg4cSc-u-eMKwVW0mFOqVRrH/view" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;" target="_blank">Improv 4</a><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After this Alex asked them to try it as if they were actually looking for the academy and to start with that. This clip is below:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vJUBIdv-pd6rz7bfWpBH67FRRoy50ZP3/view" target="_blank">Improv 5</a></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I liked all of these, they all had&nbsp;different aspects to them that I want to include in the edit, however, I understand that&nbsp;they are all very long. As a result of this, they will need to be&nbsp;chopped down and moved around to create a short story that makes sense, while keeping in the&nbsp;original jokes they&nbsp;made on the spot. We only want the GV's to take up a small amount of time in the film, although we now have dialogue to put on top this still&nbsp;can't be for a long amount of time. Due to creating a comedy, the scenes and shots need to be quick and choppy, and&nbsp;watching a van drive around while listening to some jokes&nbsp;isn't quick or choppy. I will need to play around with&nbsp;these in the edit to try and get the shortest but funniest line to use in the film. In&nbsp;addition to this, I liked Ed's first comment about the glove box from&nbsp;<i>Improv 1</i> and then the line - "actually no&nbsp;don't go in there" -&nbsp;remembering the discovery he made&nbsp;earlier in the story. I think it's beneficial for the comedy to relate back to aspects of the story. It can make the&nbsp;audience remember back to the joke they may have laughed at the first time.&nbsp;Similar to why Alex brought Tess back to the final scene after writing&nbsp;her lines out. .......</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Finally, the last scene that we definitely needed a voice over for was scene 13. This will be placed over the credits as the last thing we see is Tim drive out of the car park of the pub. Due to VET-MAN being inspired by <i>The Thick Of It </i>we would like to replicate their style by using no music. Although we don't want to, we may have to include a small amount of music in the night scene, however, we would quite like to keep the beginning titles silent similarly to <i>The Thick Of It.</i> We didn't want to include any music while the credits are rolling, but we decided against leaving them completely silent. Taking inspiration from <i>The Thick Of It </i>again, they roll their credits over the last scene, so the viewer is listening to the rest of the scene while watching the credits roll. The credits then pause and the viewer is back to watching the scene again, a few seconds later the rest of the credits roll. We won't be cutting up the credits in this way, but the dialogue over the top gave Alex the idea of putting a voice over on top of our credits. After familiarising myself further with episodes of <i>The Thick Of It,&nbsp;</i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I thought that it actually looked quite effective, and it gives us a reason to not use music. To inspire Ed and Dan, Alex and I suggested ideas such as they're leaving after all the events that have happened that day, what are their thoughts on the day? Where do they plan on going next? Should they continue the dream? And as expected they&nbsp;created&nbsp;another well-improvised comedic voice over.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The clips we got after advising what to talk about are below:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1SL2q05uOin3mU3t4ROumsqoSEDrSNJJ5/view" target="_blank">Improv 6</a></span><br /><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1q8zP5fut9YVX09mzMH8FYFOrpm1rCRWo/view" target="_blank"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">ED_16</span></a><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We liked both of these especially as they both had the ferret comment which we thought was very funny. Listening to them back, I think the first clip was better as it included the original comment about the ferret. The second clip wasn't as organic as they knew we liked the ferret comment so they repeated the same joke. We all laughed at that comment so I would really like this to be the end point of the whole film, just before Luke laughs I will cut it and it'll end on silence.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>ADR</b>&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We wanted to&nbsp;conduct an ADR session on the voice over day in order to&nbsp;improve the dialogue from the Owl Academy car park, and to replace the&nbsp;dialogue we had lost. I did&nbsp;research into ADR on a previous blog post - <i>Prepping the Re-shoot and Voice over Day</i>, however once we came to the voice over day, I sat down with Ferg and he made me realise&nbsp;actually how hard ADR is, and it&nbsp;won't be able to be done properly without any previous tutoring. As we already had the cast coming in, Alex and I felt it would be&nbsp;best to have the day to focus purely on the voice overs and to conduct the ADR day later on after we've had some practise with Ferg. This way I will be able to fully prepare for the ADR day and it'll hopefully run smoothly. By conducting the voice over on this day rather than waiting to do it with the new ADR day meant that this day wasn't wasted time or money on the budget as we still had work to show from it. As Ferg said, the day wasn't a waste anyway as Alex and I learnt something, however, it was simply easier to conduct the ADR day later on when we would have had more time and a chance to practise using the new sound equipment in Production Room 2.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Having the conversation about ADR to Ferg made me realise that I clearly&nbsp;didn't conduct enough research into how to create ADR as I&nbsp;didn't realise how much preparation it required. As a result of this, I researched further into the&nbsp;technique so I would hopefully be prepped mentally with some knowledge, before sitting and&nbsp;learning the&nbsp;physical side to the sound equipment. I felt strongly about learning the ADR&nbsp;technique properly and not just to get through the day. If I'm going to learn about it, I may as well learn about it properly as a whole, rather than just learning how to do it the once. In&nbsp;addition to this, a future career opportunity may arise in which I need to have basic knowledge of ADR, and if I sit with Ferg a number of times and learn the technique now, I may be able to use it in the future.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I understand that the voice overs we created and the plans I have in mind of where to put the dialogue may change once I return to improving the next rough cut. I could realise that the dialogue is too long and impossible to cut down which would mean that it may need to be cut, or I might be able to get more of the voice overs in elsewhere on top of where we have already planned for them to go (scene 2, 6-7 and 13).&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Researching into voice overs to start with made me realise that they are extremely useful for different types of films. I learnt that they can be used for a&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">quick exposition, to tell stories, for&nbsp;narration, and they can provide an intimate look into the mind of a character. It also made me think that we could have planned a voice over in the script, it&nbsp;didn't have to be used for solution to a problem that we came across later on in production.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Although I didn't conduct the right sort of research / not enough research into ADR for a completely successful day, this research did help. I remembered the advice from sound recordist Randy Thom and the fact that our actors probably won't be able to get into character immediately. I hope this put both Ed and Dan at ease at the fact I wasn't pushing them or hurrying them up to get into character.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Realising that we couldn't conduct the ADR was an eye opener. When it was originally recommended it didn't sound like it would require all the preparation and set-up that Ferg was explaining to me. I have learnt to always speak to Ferg first when using a piece of equipment that is new to me. We still have a couple of months left of the course so something may still arise in which I'll need to talk to Ferg about&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">so I have learnt something. I have created a voice over before in Production Room 2, so I thought I could handle the ADR method. Although, the voice over day didn't go to plan completely, I learnt a lot about preparation, which I will take forward into the future.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>References:</i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">Laughman, E. (n/d).&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">The Voice Over and Its Use in Film.</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">&nbsp;Available: https://ctlsites.uga.edu/nvgf/ethans-article/. Last accessed 13th March 2019.</span></i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;"><br /></span></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">-&nbsp;</span></i></span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Thom, R. (n/d).&nbsp;ADR.&nbsp;Available: http://filmsound.org/terminology/adr.htm. Last accessed 9th March 2019.</i></div></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-43080660529727153972019-03-11T19:47:00.001+00:002019-05-09T23:01:17.468+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Creating Rough Cut 2 & Feedback<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Following my feedback from both Alex and Simon on rough cut 1, I proceeded to improve the edit.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I started by taking on board my most recent feedback of adding more close ups of Tim's face in the pub, and adding the shot of</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;when Luke drops the bag at Sheila's house.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">One of Simon's feedback comments from Rough Cut 1 was to end the film on Tim's face rather than watching the van drive away. I liaised with Alex on this and he wasn't sure how he wanted to end the film just yet. As a result of this, Rough Cut 2 ends in the same way of seeing</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;the van drive out of The Bell Inn car park. This is something I will think about while editing the second rough cut of the film.&nbsp;</span><br /><div style="margin: 0px;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the first rough cut, it wasn't clear as to why Tim had a black eye in the pub and who gave it to him. I realised that's because I ended on the wrong shot. I&nbsp;ended on a shot of Tim and Luke after&nbsp;punching the owl, but in another shot we see Mollie get angry and subsequently in the next scene Tim has a black eye. To make a clearer understanding of how Tim got the black eye, I changed the last shot in scene 11 so the audience could see Mollie getting angry. Then when we see Tim in the next scene, it is more self&nbsp;explanatory to what has just happened.&nbsp;Similarly to when Mark walks up to Tim, he is a big, intimidating man and then next we see Tim with a bloody nose. The audience&nbsp;should be able to understand what's just happened without having&nbsp;to actually see a fight.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To further improve rough cut 2 I added more close ups throughout the whole film, particularly focusing on the owl punch scene. I liaised with Alex on how he wanted this scene to look as it is a big part of the film. He explained that he wanted a selection of short takes, mainly made up of close ups. The quick cuts will give more emphasis on the distressed bird, along with owl screech sound effects which will be added in the fine cut, this should look quite effective and give off the idea of panic and distress that we want. It was extremely difficult to keep the continuity of an owl constantly flapping its wings but Alex said that it shouldn't notice too much with the quick cuts. I took this onboard and continued to add in more close ups, but I made sure that the owl's wings were either up or down and the owl was facing the same way on each cut, to keep the continuity as best as I could.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></span></div><div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HE3ik4Ce2Eo/XIbC_eQl-YI/AAAAAAAADQo/kCyOnyJhxeUwM7PlDO2FHB1P-T5qPhXQQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.19.38.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="736" data-original-width="1600" height="294" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HE3ik4Ce2Eo/XIbC_eQl-YI/AAAAAAAADQo/kCyOnyJhxeUwM7PlDO2FHB1P-T5qPhXQQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.19.38.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Adding in more close ups</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The night scene that we include in the film is purely visual based. It shows Tim and Luke entering the Owl Academy the night after meeting Mollie&nbsp;and drugging one of the owls. They are dressed in black with Luke wearing a&nbsp;full face mask, due to the idea of sneaking into the Academy they both are reluctant to&nbsp;speak and instead&nbsp;communicate with silly hand signals. As a&nbsp;result of this, there wasn't any dialogue to&nbsp;sync with the footage.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Although the night scene will be made up of atmos, rather than our actual audio we captured on the night, I still had to put a selection of our audio down to accompany the night scene as Luke walks and runs around the Academy. Usually, we would hear his footsteps on the&nbsp;ground and especially on the&nbsp;pebbled ground around the enclosures. This may not&nbsp;have been a problem if we hadn't&nbsp;already filmed there in a previous scene (</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">where Tim and Luke make their first appearance at the Owl&nbsp;Academy)</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;and had the footsteps of Mollie walking around.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The&nbsp;atmos that we gathered from that night is very loud due the wind that day, but luckily the sound of the footsteps,&nbsp;enclosure lock and gate are quite clear. I tried my best to sync the sound of the footsteps and gate as we&nbsp;didn't use a&nbsp;clapperboard that night before each take. I had to leave slightly earlier due to work on that shoot day so&nbsp;unfortunately I wasn't there to remind them of the clapperboard and speaking the take and scene number aloud. Due to this, I struggled similarly to Katie in the&nbsp;initial owl edit with syncing the audio with no clapperboard.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-nV8zyi9xWpI/XIbDjodYz-I/AAAAAAAADQw/Sfzvh2zwWZIGMg6KJDA6XYUDJAagtGuxwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.22.03.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="632" data-original-width="1430" height="282" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-nV8zyi9xWpI/XIbDjodYz-I/AAAAAAAADQw/Sfzvh2zwWZIGMg6KJDA6XYUDJAagtGuxwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.22.03.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Adding the audio into the night scene</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BAcLRxF3x_U/XIbDlF_TabI/AAAAAAAADQ0/DzGrYgt_qFkTgQaMA61s3qZDOBHDUfdngCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.22.15.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="630" data-original-width="1428" height="282" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BAcLRxF3x_U/XIbDlF_TabI/AAAAAAAADQ0/DzGrYgt_qFkTgQaMA61s3qZDOBHDUfdngCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.22.15.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Adjusting the volume level for the night scene</span></td></tr></tbody></table><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Rough cut 2</b></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="YOUTUBE-iframe-video" data-thumbnail-src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/ACbyWbXsk8w/0.jpg" frameborder="0" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ACbyWbXsk8w?feature=player_embedded" width="711"></iframe></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Alex's notes:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Starts a little too quickly - maybe some still GVs before Tim walks in the room? // alternatively, we could start on lots of fast cuts with opening/closing cupboard doors etc to create a sense of tension and confusion?&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Audio levels need adjusting&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Maybe end scene 1 on broken vase with J-cut?&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Scene 2 could be snappier - maybe cut earlier when Tim sits down in the van?&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Cock reveal is a bit slow - could bring the zoom in earlier&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Van reversing out needs trimming a lot - maybe on ADR day we could record dialogue to fill void here?</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Shot of Sheila opening the door was shaky - do we have another take we can use?&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Maybe stay on shot of Luke's "cat?" reaction a little longer&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Can we potentially speed up the driving away scene?&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Need something to bridge between scenes 5 and 6&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Scene 6 could be snappier - maybe cut just as they walk away?&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Nice owl GVs&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Scene 7 could be snappier - cut earlier, maybe before Mollie walks away&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Cut beginning of scene 8 - g</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">et rid of Luke's first reaction shot - feels too early&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Do we have a steadier shot of the moon?&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Maybe speed up the sign language bit&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- More frantic owl action&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Tim hands Luke the leaflets twice&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Tighter shots of scene 11 - if we have the coverage&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Stick on Tim and Luke's reaction to the owl punch for longer and end on Tim's smile&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Do we have a clearer/tighter view of Tim's eye?&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- There's a little creak on the table when Tim is talking - try to hide that if you can?&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Cut to wider shot as Tess walks through the door (other than that I'm happy with the shots here)</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Cut back to Luke before we see Mark - if we have the coverage - then back to Mark&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Can we stay on Mark and Tim's stare-off a little longer? (Coverage again)&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Make scene 12 a little tighter - apart from "at least we have each other" line - that is timed perfectly&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Although we know we're going to re-shoot the dog hit scene, Alex still gave feedback on this part of the film. I will aim to apply this feedback to the new footage after the re-shoot:</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Do we have another take of the flat-pack line? - felt a little flat</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Cuts during surgery scene should be faster - more frantic&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- It's not entirely clear that Tim has killed the dog - probably due to lack of coverage&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We need to see the slogan as Sheila sees it - again, probably lack of coverage&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Need something to cut to after Sheila leaves - coverage&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- At no point does Sheila say where she lives - my fault - it was in an earlier version of the script</span></div></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Some of his notes will be completed in the fine cut, such as:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Driving scene does not look like driving - try layering movement</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Owl screeching noises</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Add game sound effects when Tim is on his phone - fine cut&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Pub&nbsp;atmos&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We need to work out an ending</span><br /><br /></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sim</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">on's notes:</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Cut on "what does it taste like?"</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Cut when we see van reveal - inside van - "cockerels really?" -&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">then drive off</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- GV’s of van in countryside</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Reverse and pull into owl academy - t</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">hen drug conversation? Cut the original conversation up&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- During this edit, I reminded&nbsp;myself again of the importance of the clapperboard. The night scene was very difficult to sync. I blame&nbsp;myself for having to leave earlier for work,&nbsp;although I had initially scheduled the night scene for the previous day when I booked the night off, it had to be changed to the Thursday night a couple of days prior to the shoot day.&nbsp;Although I&nbsp;encountered the struggle of editing without the clapperboard, I believe that the time I put into adding the footsteps and gate sounds was worth it. By the time I had finished, it sounded very effective and more realistic now we could hear the steps and gate. The scene will be finished off well by adding clearer atmos to surround these additional sounds. This will be completed in the fine cut.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The fact that Simon suggested to mix up the conversation with the drugs so we discover the drugs once we've pulled up in the owl academy, rather than when we are first introduced to Luke and the van, relates to my research into the rough cut from .... in a previous blog post. I found that just because the script flows from beginning to end, doesn't mean the edit will and there's nothing wrong with cutting up the scenes slightly. Although I had researched into cutting the story up, I haven't actually though about it until now when I received the feedback about mixing up the drugs conversation. I will take this into Rough Cut 3 and experiment with changing this scene up slightly.</span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-25779843939669474492019-03-09T19:48:00.001+00:002019-05-09T23:01:08.405+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Preparation for Reshoot, Pickups & Voice Over Day with ADR Research<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Margate reshoot</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we decided to reshoot, I had to contact the cast involved and agree a date with them. After throwing a couple of dates around, our cast members for Tim, Luke and Sheila agreed on Wednesday 20th March. This was a perfect date for Katie, Alex and I also, as well as our sound&nbsp;assistant, runner and make-up artist.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">While I was in contact with the actors, I also reminded them of their costumes on the day. Our cast member for Sheila asked if she had to be in the same costume due to re-shooting all of her scenes. I suggested that she wear the same clothes as she was wearing on the day incase we want to cut around and use some of the footage we recorded previously. The&nbsp;costumes for our characters are as below:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>Tim</i><b> </b>- scrubs &amp; hoodie (provided by us) &amp; dark jeans, grey hoodie grey top, brown boots</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>Luke</i> - grey hoodie (provided by us) &amp; black jeans, green top, vans, green parka</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>Sheila</i><b> </b>- pink cardigan (provided by us) &amp; purple blouse, velvet scarf, dark trousers</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we realised during the previous shoot day that Alex blood wasn't good enough to use in the shoot, we will not be using Beth's fake blood again, instead we will bring our own. This will be an extra cost on the budget but it will be worth it to get a good, fresh, red blood splatter. Another cost on the budget will be to get Alex and Tim insured on the Vet Van again. Even though this is re-shoot, I want to approach it as if it was the first time we were shooting there. This means insuring both of them on the van for safety, instead of thinking th</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">at we won't need the van for long so theres no need to bother. I didn't consider any additional van insurance on the budget so this will also be an extra cost, but it'll be worth it to add to the quality of the film. As we only need the van insured for Tim for the day, and for Alex for three days the cost shouldn't be as big as it was during the main shoot week.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the first shoot day in Margate, I have set the call time for crew at 8am, and the call time for the cast at 9am. As we have already completed this shoot day, we hope it'll be a relatively easy shoot. We also know how to improve the shots, in relation to the blood splatter, which will be beneficial towards the timing of the day. The re-shoot shouldn't take as long</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;because we have shot the scenes that are involved previously and essentially we are repeating what we did last time, with a few extra shots added on top of this.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span>As we are re-shooting I am confident that we will be going over the budget. In order to calculate how much extra Katie, Alex and I need to put into the budget, I estimated an amount by using the prices we have already found during the main shoot week. For the Margate shoot, as we are re-shooting in a location we have already been to, I can easily calculate the amount we would need for the cast's travel. Alex is bringing our sound assistant to the shoot and our make-up artist and runner said that they don't want paying as they both don't live far from the location. As a result of this, it is only the cast's travel we need to include in the new estimated budget amount. Below are my calculations of the price of the Margate shoot added with the voiceover day estimates, based on previous food and travel prices. With these, I have created a total and subtracted our current budget of £81.55, as although we haven't run out of money for the budget just yet, we wanted enough in the bank account to cover us for the rest of the shooting period, and our remaining budget of £81.55 wouldn't have covered the re-shoot alone.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Voiceover day:<br /><br />Tim's travel - 25.60<br />Luke's travel - 39.55</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Food (estimate) - 8.99</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">= £74.14</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Margate shoot:</span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />Tim's travel - 48.20<br />Luke's travel - 49.35<br />Sheila's travel - 20.00<br />Food (estimate) - 10.00<br />Van insurance for 2 people - 66.55<br />= £194.10</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">74.14 + 194.10 = £268.24</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">(£81.55 left in current budget)</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />232.69 - 81.55 = <b>£186.69</b><br /><br />/3 = <b>£62.23 each</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I have already thought about props and costume, as this estimate of budget is after purchasing more fake blood. This is the first thing we did when we decided to re-shoot as it will be a vital visual part of the film - we need enough of it. I have also washed the costumes which got fake blood on them to see whether we would need to buy more clothes. Luckily the blood came out really well which means we can put more towards the travel of the cast rather than their clothes.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In order to cover any unexpected costs that may come up, during the re-shoot days I suggested putting in £100 each, instead of the odd £62.23. Katie and Alex were happy to do this and then we can split the final remaining money back out evenly after the re-shoot day and pick up shots.</span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Locations</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Margate re-shoot:&nbsp;</span><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JnWxutBVJVc/XLzC1IDTIgI/AAAAAAAADis/eawSmkK5sHEJRcwCiOYJuBYgjiolGIgvgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-21%2Bat%2B20.21.28.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="996" data-original-width="614" height="400" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JnWxutBVJVc/XLzC1IDTIgI/AAAAAAAADis/eawSmkK5sHEJRcwCiOYJuBYgjiolGIgvgCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-21%2Bat%2B20.21.28.png" width="246" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Church timetable according to website</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We were happy with the previous location we used in Margate on St Mary's Road, apart from a&nbsp;couple of shots where we caught cars moving in the background, we were pleased with the quality of the&nbsp;shots and&nbsp;background that came with the location. As a&nbsp;result of this, we were all happy to conduct the re-shoot in the same location.&nbsp;Using the&nbsp;same location can benefit our film in case we want to use any of the&nbsp;initial footage. If we had changed location, we would have had to make sure everything was re-shot&nbsp;which may create more work for us that we need. Like I&nbsp;previously said, we were happy with some of the shots we got on the first shoot day, so we will be able to use&nbsp;initial footage in the edit if we want.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I had to keep in mind all the same pros and cons of using that location as I did before the main shoot week. To do this, I referred back to the church timetable to make sure the Wednesday 20th March I have currently suggested was as good as that first Monday (18th Feb). Looking at the church timetable I found that on Wednesday also had a period of time where they had more than one activity on at one time. This is similar to the Monday we previously filmed on and we coped fine with the amount of people around. However, Wednesday is a day when there are two periods during the day in which they have more than one activity on at the church. Looking at the times in which these activities start, they are a good length of time away from each other which would give us a good amount of time to film in. The first two activities start at 10am and one finishes at 11:30am. This gives us a good hour and a half to shoot the first scene or so until lunch. Between 9am and 10am, we can brief the cast and go through a few parts in the scenes which are changing or that are developing. The next activity starts at 2pm, when we would have had lunch and we will be prepared to continue filming once everyone has entered the church. The two activities finish at 3pm and 3:30pm when we would have hopefully wrapped by then or be close to wrapping. To sum up, we should be able to work film around these times quite well as they land on good timing, either in the morning or at lunch time. As a result of this, I have decided that I will make the Wednesday 20th March a definite date. I already know the cast and crew can make it which is very helpful instead of having to re-arrange.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To prep for the re-shoot I contacted the Kent Film Office as I did for the first shoot week. Along with this, I sent round another set of letters for the residents of St. Mary's Avenue to keep them informed. I imagine that I won't get any emails about the filming as I didn't during the main shoot week. I explained in the email that we needed to re-shoot and everything is the same as the first time, just more up-to-date. For example, there was a new risk assessment created and the local authorities have been informed again.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8MopR6UXJSg/XLzCPmbjXKI/AAAAAAAADik/5gFF8j9qy-U0eNEBCjzj-2zqa4S1o6EwACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-21%2Bat%2B20.18.55.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="948" data-original-width="1156" height="524" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8MopR6UXJSg/XLzCPmbjXKI/AAAAAAAADik/5gFF8j9qy-U0eNEBCjzj-2zqa4S1o6EwACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-21%2Bat%2B20.18.55.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Residents re-shoot letter</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">GV locations:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In terms of the locations for the GV's of the van, I asked Alex what sort of area he wanted the van to drive through. He said he wanted a rural area, similarly to a countryside but as those lanes are small and bendy, they would be quite dangerous to film on. Most countryside roads also lack pavements,&nbsp;meaning there&nbsp;wouldn't be a&nbsp;safe area for the crew to stand on. As I had ruled out the countryside, it came down to using roads which are more rural than residential, giving a countryside-look to the GV's. Margate and the majority of Thanet is quite residential. At least all the roads I know are and I&nbsp;wouldn't class Thanet as a rural area. As a result of this, I&nbsp;felt it was best to look further afield. Alex suggested New Ash Green, where we shot Scene 1 and 2 of VET-MAN. He knows the area well and said that the town is quite rural. I must admit&nbsp;whenever I drive through the area, I always need to use rural roads to get around. In order to narrow down the roads in New Ash Green, I thought about the safety of the crew on each of the roads. The two which seemed&nbsp;safest were&nbsp;Chapel Wood Road and North Ash Road. This is&nbsp;because they both have places in which we can stop the van and get the equipment out. These safe places could also be a good base for the location, as Jennifer Westin suggested in my previous research. Alex will need to stop the van each time he drives passed the camera. Chapel Wood Road has a pub on one side of the road which has a free car park&nbsp;next door. North Ash Road has free street parking where we would also be safe to pull over the van. In both locations, there are paths up and down the road and the car park and street parking are not far from where we want Katie to stand. This is&nbsp;beneficial for us as Alex can stop nearby to talk to the crew, rather than driving too far to find somewhere to pull over safely.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I visited the two roads to understand myself how we could shoot the Vet Van, and to see if these roads in person look as if they would work, rather than just taking Alex's word for it or just looking at photos online. North Ash Road (shown in the photos below) is quite rural and is surrounded by trees. Looking at the first photo below, it may look good visually for the van to drive from North Ash Road and turn into Lambardes and then we could watch it drive through the trees. I think that we won't want too many shots of the van driving straight, especially as Luke says in the voiceover that the Owl Academy is <i>"just up here on the left"</i>, we would need a turning in there somewhere. If we just included shots of the van driving along straight roads it may not look like the van is actually going anywhere, and we want it to look as believable as it can that they're looking for the academy. Putting in a few shots of the van turning corners may also make the shots look more interesting, rather than just driving along straight roads. Nevertheless, we still want a few shots on straight roads to mix it up slightly.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The white dotted line shows the possible direction the van could travel.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bDSKWbxzlKs/XKowkhdc3YI/AAAAAAAADek/0eewt-SiORU84fTLgmz7iFdZVg-dR2UzACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-07%2Bat%2B18.16.43.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="561" data-original-width="1154" height="310" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bDSKWbxzlKs/XKowkhdc3YI/AAAAAAAADek/0eewt-SiORU84fTLgmz7iFdZVg-dR2UzACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-07%2Bat%2B18.16.43.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">North Ash Road</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The photo below is of another corner on North Ash Road. This one is&nbsp;leading into Manor Forstal instead. This corner would be used for the same reason as the previous corner on Lambardes, however, we may be able to get a closer shot of the van turning this corner. The only thing is that it might not be as visually pleasing as driving through the trees might look. This is the sort of thing we can test while driving along both Chapel Wood Road and North Ash Road, but I agree that this is a wide rural looking road, which has good potential for a few GV's in the film. Unfortunately, I didn't pick up any photos of Chapel Wood road when I was there, but it again was a wide, rural road. Chapel Wood Road was more of a straight road as it had less corners. The corners also didn't look as good as the ones shown in the photos on North Ash Road. As a result of this, after visiting the locations I have decided that it may be best to get a couple of shots of the van driving on straight roads down Chapel Wood Road, and to get a couple of turns along North Ash Road.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/--zwV1nbVzR0/XKoy2U2JXkI/AAAAAAAADe4/Zkp90iiVOVwk2NLIp6jVIKXX4ImtNwmAwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-07%2Bat%2B18.26.20.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="610" data-original-width="1152" height="338" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/--zwV1nbVzR0/XKoy2U2JXkI/AAAAAAAADe4/Zkp90iiVOVwk2NLIp6jVIKXX4ImtNwmAwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-07%2Bat%2B18.26.20.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">North Ash Road</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After visiting both roads in New Ash Green, I was happy to have these as the GV locations. Once I had agreed the date (Monday 20th March) with everyone, I had to create a new risk assessment for St Mary's Avenue in Margate, the two main roads in New Ash Green and a risk assessment for the shot of the dog. As as were re-shooting the majority of the scenes in Margate, I was able to base my new risk assessment on the previous version I made on the main shoot week and add more if it needed it. We will only require cast on the re-shoot in Margate, on the other three locations we will only need a few members of crew.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Margate risk assessment - written:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vSMMYrE44MkmXricY1qa-AXIYxWL4xaHGXEjxbCPprXGKy5Z7Zqp7waGUG3pk6IuvYCwug0Wd5g97Qs/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Margate risk assessment - visual:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We are re-shooting the same scenes as we did in the main shoot week and I aim to act as professionally as I did the first time. As a result of this, I have created additional visual risk assessments but they hold the cast and crew in the same positions as before. The visual assessment below is from when Tim and Luke have just hit the dog and are standing over it looking at it on the ground. Similarly to last time, the crew and cast will be positioned on the safety of the grass throughout the time they are on the road. The runner will be positioned opposite watching the traffic from both ends of the road, and the side road.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-W_AQ4HYjxfU/XNBLeDLW7jI/AAAAAAAAD3k/3G0brXk1HCE26SIrhI_eClFXYns1cpWwgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B15.57.31.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="546" data-original-width="834" height="418" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-W_AQ4HYjxfU/XNBLeDLW7jI/AAAAAAAAD3k/3G0brXk1HCE26SIrhI_eClFXYns1cpWwgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B15.57.31.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The visual assessment below is during the surgery scene when Tim is&nbsp;operating on the dog. Like last time, the runner will be positioned in the same place so they can see both roads. Luke will be stood at the back of the van during some points,&nbsp;however, he will be protected by the van doors. He will only stand in the road behind the van when we are filming the shot before the surgery when he is getting the&nbsp;screwdrivers and stethoscope out of the bag. All other cast and crew will be on the grass throughout the duration of the scene.</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-gE-J4TxnHkE/XNBL8z8Jh8I/AAAAAAAAD3w/81ZCQIB8y6wgL9wxx-k2IEQHRlMtvDdyACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B15.59.23.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="428" data-original-width="832" height="328" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-gE-J4TxnHkE/XNBL8z8Jh8I/AAAAAAAAD3w/81ZCQIB8y6wgL9wxx-k2IEQHRlMtvDdyACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B15.59.23.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The visual assessment below shows the shot when Sheila walks over after noticing Tim and Luke. Similarly to last time, I will position a runner by the side road with a view of the cul de sac and side road. The runner will be&nbsp;there to ensure Sheila walks across the side road safely and with no&nbsp;problems. If a vehicle does start moving either in the church car park or on&nbsp;the main road, the runner will inform us and we&nbsp;will&nbsp;pause filming until the vehicle has stopped or left the road.</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yLuLjBDcQHE/XNBMIAyuXLI/AAAAAAAAD30/GPzLG-5GIpo_f_DbXQtWxsG2z9eFQLIMQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B16.00.30.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="414" data-original-width="834" height="316" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yLuLjBDcQHE/XNBMIAyuXLI/AAAAAAAAD30/GPzLG-5GIpo_f_DbXQtWxsG2z9eFQLIMQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B16.00.30.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The visual assessment below shows scene 6 when Luke runs back to the van after leaving the dead dog at Sheila's doorstep. As he runs across the side road, I have positioned the runner in a similar place to before, but just on the opposite side to be out of the&nbsp;camera shot.&nbsp;However, the runner will still have full view of the cul de sac road and side road / car park.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-jNX5iOAk6pA/XNBMx2a_HkI/AAAAAAAAD4E/qpqVMjxCQHYXJL0PTGLlJ1RKXv7av-xfQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B16.03.12.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="464" data-original-width="828" height="358" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-jNX5iOAk6pA/XNBMx2a_HkI/AAAAAAAAD4E/qpqVMjxCQHYXJL0PTGLlJ1RKXv7av-xfQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-06%2Bat%2B16.03.12.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Dog and GV's shoot</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to the additional shots we were recommended to get of the dead dog, and GV's of the van driving around, I had to create new risk assessments. The first risk assessment I created was for the dog. Katie, Alex and I decided that the dog shots can be done in any location due to the idea of zooming in on the shot so we cannot see the background. We felt this was the most appropriate way of shooting the dog instead of bringing a dog to Margate. I don't know any obedient dogs in that area, whereas, Katie and Alex do in their area. As we experienced in our previous Transitions Unit, working with animals can be difficult, and the pressure would be greater if we had to bring a dog from the Gravesend / Longfield area to Margate.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /><b>Dog risk assessment - written:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The house in which we will be filming the dog outside is in a residential area. Next to each road in the area is a pavement making it safe to walk through the area. This builds on the safety of our shoot as there are many safe areas for the crew to walk around on. As we are filming the dog separately, there will be no cast members present at this location.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vSyfTELlWCihfDAMNDh38PQ-lisNWpyuJyogom2Heqd4nDsUY38ub-WTCCws84r0VyebNPWPpqfbNGl/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Dog risk assessment - visual:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-sQjeAR7ht4k/XMv54oQDxKI/AAAAAAAADwA/VgC5E8lRv6UESTKNT_XrGd6OL_dxQyENACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-03%2Bat%2B09.20.29.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="239" data-original-width="1156" height="81" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-sQjeAR7ht4k/XMv54oQDxKI/AAAAAAAADwA/VgC5E8lRv6UESTKNT_XrGd6OL_dxQyENACLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-03%2Bat%2B09.20.29.png" width="400" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">For the majority of the time, crew members will be stood on the path and grass next to the road, apart from when the dog is being filmed in the road. While this happens, Katie may need to stand in the road to get the coverage we need. There is no other reason as to why Alex, the owner of the dog and myself should be standing in the road so we will stay on the path.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we are working with an animal which, we discovered in our previous Transitions Unit, can be&nbsp;difficult, the owner will be with us at all times. We have been informed that the dog is very&nbsp;obedient and we want him to feel as comfortable as&nbsp;possible around the crew and&nbsp;camera&nbsp;equipment. I&nbsp;believe that the dog will feel most comfortable if the owner is present at all times, which is why I have arranged it like this.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-SAqzZ_9CCPo/XMv45VnpE1I/AAAAAAAADv0/HAKRIsrPk7oXtsIoDdXlGuO0VtHXWhFLgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-03%2Bat%2B09.16.14.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="936" data-original-width="938" height="638" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-SAqzZ_9CCPo/XMv45VnpE1I/AAAAAAAADv0/HAKRIsrPk7oXtsIoDdXlGuO0VtHXWhFLgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-03%2Bat%2B09.16.14.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to only needing to get coverage of a dog in the road and in the side of the van, we have&nbsp;decided against using a sound assistant for this shot. In terms of sound effects, we want to get a sound of a dog yelp from a royalty free sound website. As we want the dog to yelp in&nbsp;pain, we&nbsp;obviously&nbsp;don't want to actually hurt a real dog just for the sound. As a result of this, royalty free sound will work in this scenario and there is no need for atmos as we have&nbsp;this from the shoot in Margate.</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we&nbsp;won't be needing a sound assistant, this brings our crew numbers to 4 (including dog owner). As we are only filming the one shot, I felt that a runner wouldn't be needed but as we are filming in the road we still need someone to keep an eye on the traffic. I will position myself as the runner on the opposite side of the road so I have full view of the cul de sac on one side and the junction on the other end of the road. As I have already explained, we only need the one shot of the dog laying down, due to this, I will liaise with Alex and Katie beforehand and we can discuss the details of the shot, such as the type of shot they want to get and for how long they will be aiming to get it for. Once I am informed of the shot, I can stand on the opposite side of the road and watch for traffic. In this time, Katie will have hopefully captured the shot. Positioning myself as shown in the diagram above means that I will have full view of the road and any cars that may enter the road. Similarly to the runners on the shoot days, I will inform the crew of any cars coming in and the owner can move the dog out of the road until the car has left or stopped.&nbsp;</span></div><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>GV risk assessment 1 - written:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vQpigYTUjAp5yTIAm8mfWjMTOslrKRG_J9MnmcXIvbyPiWj5Pt2-XL9ok1fUre5OT8oSXhpUXSVbfIi/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>GV risk assessment 1 - visual:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Lk43ktH7HqQ/XMnBa4_u2rI/AAAAAAAADu4/3g9mODl5qF8ZdTpPYM6vL3hXfTI00-0vQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.55.07.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="350" data-original-width="852" height="81" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Lk43ktH7HqQ/XMnBa4_u2rI/AAAAAAAADu4/3g9mODl5qF8ZdTpPYM6vL3hXfTI00-0vQCLcBGAs/s200/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.55.07.png" width="200" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This location is purely to gather coverage of the Vet Van driving around. In the story, this will come in after they have hit the dog and they have driven off in search for the Owl Academy. We plan to record the voiceover which will be placed on top of the GV shots of the van. Similarly to the dog risk assessment, there will be no cast at this location. As Alex is already insured on the van, it makes sense to get him to drive it around. As we are using a voiceover rather than seeing Tim and Luke talk, it doesn't matter who drives the van. In terms of directing, Alex will brief Katie on what he wants her to achieve before he gets into the van for the shot.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-i5ewMdKsL5s/XMnBzO4JM5I/AAAAAAAADvA/zA0V4mSwDwsJAUOtjzWr0x6qrmVI5A5YACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.56.41.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="938" data-original-width="1108" height="540" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-i5ewMdKsL5s/XMnBzO4JM5I/AAAAAAAADvA/zA0V4mSwDwsJAUOtjzWr0x6qrmVI5A5YACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.56.41.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Opposite the part of the road where we want to film the GV's there is a pub which has a free car park that we can use. As we are filming in the morning, the pub shouldn't be too busy which means we can guarantee a space for the van to park in. I felt that we should have an additional person with us as we will be walking around with equipment. As a result of this, I brought a runner on board, Aidan. We will be using the microphone on the top of the camera to capture atmos while capturing the van driving around. Due to this, we didn't need a sound assistant with us.</span></span><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">GV risk assessment 2 - written:</span></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vR0H_6vuAOXck4ANwkOnHg389HvxULM54Dmw50txJ9wE5FkebppIe-tnOzUheWulUQVjsXBK6M8DVTZ/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>GV's risk assessment 2 - visual:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Lk43ktH7HqQ/XMnBa4_u2rI/AAAAAAAADu8/_gXh_KOZYyIzDIIWlDtw32D0nnpQ-IW9ACEwYBhgL/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.55.07.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="350" data-original-width="852" height="80" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Lk43ktH7HqQ/XMnBa4_u2rI/AAAAAAAADu8/_gXh_KOZYyIzDIIWlDtw32D0nnpQ-IW9ACEwYBhgL/s200/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.55.07.png" width="200" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I felt the need to have two rural locations so it would be clear in the film that we had filmed a couple of places to&nbsp;show the journey of the van from Sheila's house to the Owl Academy. As these roads are quite long, we may use different parts of the road to get more coverage, however we&nbsp;won't want to sit on the van shots for long as these will get&nbsp;boring. In the end we may only use two shots of the different locations, but we may as well get as much coverage from other parts of the same roads to look like different areas the van has driven through to get to the Owl Academy.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LnD0UA71ebM/XMnCmyVExRI/AAAAAAAADvM/fvDs40VqeEEfwq_nfElHgqG1gPVzqicpgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.59.57.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="772" data-original-width="1600" height="308" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LnD0UA71ebM/XMnCmyVExRI/AAAAAAAADvM/fvDs40VqeEEfwq_nfElHgqG1gPVzqicpgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.59.57.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I suggested driving around a couple of corners as well along this main road. Having a mixture of shots which are stationary, panning and of the van driving round corners will give a variety of shots for coverage,&nbsp;which will be helpful to choose from in the edit. The runner will be positioned near us just for more protection around the filming equipment. Along North Ash Road there is street&nbsp;parking, allowing room for Alex to pull the van&nbsp;over safely and talk to us about the shots.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-kuS-AUWrmRY/XMnFAJssk7I/AAAAAAAADvY/BigNMXWCFi05z3zOLMvnNiHKS8bu6kdzwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B17.10.21.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1003" data-original-width="1394" height="460" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-kuS-AUWrmRY/XMnFAJssk7I/AAAAAAAADvY/BigNMXWCFi05z3zOLMvnNiHKS8bu6kdzwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B17.10.21.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">There is a road called Lambardes which I visited during my location recce at the&nbsp;beginning of the blog post. Lambardes is shown in one of the photographs. When I visited North Ash Road, I felt that it would be nice to see the van&nbsp;drive through the trees. It will&nbsp;definitely&nbsp;make it more interesting turning corners than watching the van&nbsp;drive on&nbsp;straight roads. We will be positioned as shown below, keeping away from the main roads to minimise the risk of any accidents.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JQRpn3P1IY4/XMnFA23EFcI/AAAAAAAADvc/361nHUvmkMEOLouHyNvF9mUQ78o5RubVgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B17.09.29.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="878" data-original-width="1466" height="382" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JQRpn3P1IY4/XMnFA23EFcI/AAAAAAAADvc/361nHUvmkMEOLouHyNvF9mUQ78o5RubVgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B17.09.29.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Voice over &amp; ADR day</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To prepare for the voice over and ADR day I first agreed a date in which both Ed and Dan could come in to the studios for the day. After suggesting a couple of dates, we agreed on Wednesday 13th March. My next task as the producer was to book out Production Room 2 which contains the sound equipment we will be needing for this day to be successful.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ZeoIpopJf3I/XMX_fx78fPI/AAAAAAAADrU/MBQCuvbYAh4SPNI4yYr8KTB6XJ0tbsngACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-28%2Bat%2B20.30.45.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="850" data-original-width="960" height="566" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ZeoIpopJf3I/XMX_fx78fPI/AAAAAAAADrU/MBQCuvbYAh4SPNI4yYr8KTB6XJ0tbsngACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-28%2Bat%2B20.30.45.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Room booking form for Wednesday 13th</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The ADR portion of the day is purely to record some audio for scenes 7 and 9. The original audio for these scenes is not as good as it could be due to the windy weather on the shoot day. Therefore, we want to try and re-record the audio so it matches the action on screen. M</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">ost of our problems that I discovered during the rough cut were to do with audio which, fortunately, is easier to gain / replace than more footage. The first piece of affected sound was in scenes 7 &amp; 9 when Tim and Luke arrive at the Owl Academy. The wind was quite bad on this shoot day and we were surrounded by trees which meant that the background noise of the trees is also quite bad. In addition to this, we were situated in front of a river, which we didn't realise was there when we visited the Owl Academy for our test shoots. The dialogue between Tim and Luke is still very clear and understandable, but the amount of background noise in this scene is so different to the rest of the film, it stands out a lot and brings the quality of the film down.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In&nbsp;addition to this, while I was creating the rough cut I realised that I didn't have the same amount of audio as footage from scene 11 at the Owl Academy (owl punch scene). As a result of this, Alex suggested conducting an ADR day, where our Ed and Dan will come into the studios and speak their lines in time with the footage, creating clearer audio that we can use in the edit. This will also give us a good opportunity to use our new sound room, which can ultimately add to our experience within post-production. Initially, I was unsure what ADR was so I conducted some research before the day so I knew what to expect.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">ADR stands for 'automatic/automated dialogue replacement'. It is used when dialog "cannot be salvaged from production tracks" (</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif; text-align: center;">FilmSound.org, n/d</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">) and it must be re-recorded. This process can be called either lopping or ADR. Lopping originally involved recording an actor&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">who spoke lines in sync to 'loops' of the image which were played over and over along with matching lengths of recording tape. ADR is faster than the looping process, however, it still take a lot of work to create.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I will ask our actors to&nbsp;watch back the footage from scenes 7, 9 and 11 and attempt to perform each&nbsp;line to match the wording and lip movements of themselves from the footage. During my research, I was reminded that&nbsp;obviously actors vary in their ability to "achieve sync and to&nbsp;recapture the emotional tone of their performance" (FilmSound.org, n/d). Our actors may never have been involved with ADR before, and if this is the case it will be a new experience for all of us.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On the other hand, there are also some disadvantages to using ADR. American sound&nbsp;designer, Randy Thom, believes&nbsp;that the way ADR is "treated and approached is symptomatic of how little respect sound gets in the movies" (Thom, n/d). The system means that the actors get put&nbsp;into a room and they&nbsp;aren't&nbsp;usually given much time to get into character or&nbsp;rehearse. They are expected to just start performing a few minutes after they walk&nbsp;into the room.&nbsp;Randy highlights that the emphasis is almost always on&nbsp;getting the dialogue in sync instead of getting the right performance. As a result of this, the majority of the actor's mind is then occupied with whether his lips are moving at the exact same rate as they were on the day that the footage was shot. Randy explains that this is why he&nbsp;believes that most ADR is not very good, in the end directors almost always prefer the production sound, even if it's&nbsp;noise and distorted.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In&nbsp;amongst Randy's&nbsp;criticism of the&nbsp;technique, he also gave some advice. He explains that to make ADR sound more like production sound is to "pitch it up" (Thom, n/d). ADR is almost always delivered at a lower pitch&nbsp;because the actor doesn't have the energy they had on set. In the excitement of the shooting set the actor tends to talk louder and higher. In an ADR session, the "director typically has to push the actor to get them anywhere&nbsp;near the level of vocal performance that came from the set" (Thom, n/d). As producer of the project, it will be my job to ensure that Alex, as&nbsp;director, pushes our two cast members to perform as they did on location. Only once they have settled back into their characters. I understand it'll take time for them to do this. Both Ed and Dan have&nbsp;exceptionally good acting skills, especially our main character for Tim, to the point that even the way he walks adds to his character. As a&nbsp;result of this, I&nbsp;believe that he will be successful in getting into character while not on location. The auditions and script read through were also a good opportunity to see how the actors performed in a room, rather than on a location and in costume. Ed and Dan performed very well in character in both the auditions and read through even though these were set in office-type rooms, this was the reason why Alex and I chose them to be a part of VET-MAN. If they could play the part in a closed room, then they would only be better on location and in costume. As a result of this, I&nbsp;believe that they will perform in the sound room as best as they can. I will also find out if either of our actors have worked with ADR before, as this will make our experience easier if they have.&nbsp;</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Randy continues by&nbsp;saying i</span>f the recording of ADR were "treated more like shooting the movie it would almost certainly be better" (Thom, n/d). Recording it in more authentic environments (instead of studios) tends to help the actors' performance enormously. Environmental noise is a problem whenever you record outside of a studio, but it is well worth the trade-off in his opinion. I considered re-shooting the scenes in order to keep the atmosphere we had in the initial footage, however, due to the location of the car park of the Owl Academy and other car parks on site being under trees, we would have had the same problem. Even a small amount of wind would create noise around the trees and windy weather is inevitable during the winter months. After considering this, ADR seemed to be the only option. Nevertheless, this will be experience for me as I haven't used this technique before.</span><br /><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Discovering that the river behind our location of the car park had a river has made me realise how&nbsp;important location&nbsp;recce's are. In hindsight, I should have looked around more thoroughly&nbsp;during my recce or even on the test shoots, in order to find every limitation which could have affected our footage and audio.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I realised auditions and the script read through have additional benefits to the usual getting to know the cast before shooting and getting them to know each other. In our case, I am confident that Ed and Dan will be able to perform well in an area which is not the same location in the film for our ADR session. As I said previously, they both performed well in the audition room so hopefully after settling in they'll be able to perform just as well in the sound room.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Visiting the GV locations prior to filming was&nbsp;beneficial for me to get some ideas of the area and possible shots we could get and possible directions the van could drive in for the best looking shots. I was also able to note down the safe places, if there were any, at the location where the crew would stand. I knew we were going to be filming on the side of the road for all the GV shots, so as a result of this, it would be necessary to&nbsp;find a safe place to stand. I was able to visit the pavements on the roads, the car park and parking spaces to see how safe they actually were.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I have learnt from my ADR research a variety of different things, such as pitching up to sound more like production sound. I have also taken Thom's advice on board. I will be sure to try my best to relax the actors to help get them into their characters.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>References:</i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>-&nbsp;<span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">FilmSound.org. (n/d).&nbsp;</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">ADR.</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">&nbsp;Available: http://filmsound.org/terminology/adr.htm. Last accessed 9th March 2019.</span></i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;"><i><br /></i></span></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">-&nbsp;</span>Thom, R. (n/d).&nbsp;ADR.&nbsp;Available: http://filmsound.org/terminology/adr.htm. Last accessed 9th March 2019.</i></span></div></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-31419942763514575322019-03-06T16:52:00.000+00:002019-05-09T23:00:44.817+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Travel Budget Before Re-shoot & Invoices<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we have decided to re-shoot for one day, I felt it was best to log all the expenses after the main production period and then to start again for the re-shoot period.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I predicted previously, we may have some additional cast and crew members getting the train to the shoot days. Initially, I knew about Ed and Dan getting the train and then Sue arrived with them at the train station on her first shoot day. I didn't expect her to get the train, however, this was no issue and I added her onto the travel expenditure log. We initially wanted to transport all the crew to the shoots ourselves, however Katie had a problem with her car which mean't she was unable to pick up Alix, meaning that she had to get a train. We told her in advance and she was fine with this, it just meant putting an extra cost onto the budget. As I had been keeping track of the budget, I knew that we saved money on the food at The Kent Owl Academy so I was confident that we could use that saved money to put towards the travel section of the budget. Due to these changes, over the course of production I added Sue and Alix into the table, and similarly to Ed and Dan I kept a record of their receipts and how much we had to reimburse them.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I researched previously, I&nbsp;decided to create a money expenditure log so I would be able to track and record all our spendings and reimbursement amounts. In order to reimburse the full train and bus fares to our cast and crew, I had to create an expenditure log purely for travel, and then have the main expenditure log which I would, in the end, deduct the travel from once it was all added together and reimbursed. I had a record of everyones train and bus tickets in various places, a PDF which I had been emailed, photographs on my phone etc, but I felt it was best to keep this in an additional place altogether.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Travel expenditure log</span><br /><br /><iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vRhFDWo52xaEcrOEyIRRjmUOs_nAsEOE-RyIN5BkHCvRxbrylPORGBGaumiU5IiDcT2ZrW8F3islztN/pubhtml?widget=true&amp;headers=false" width="700"></iframe><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I will create a new travel expenditure log for the re-shoot to keep a track of the spendings on a clean table.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Invoices</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To act as professionally as I could and to make sure there were no queries about the money reimbursement after the main shooting period, I created invoices to send to the cast and crew when I distributed their money back to them. On the invoice I stated the date, description of travel, the amount and then the total amount they were due back. I conducted research into invoices prior to this to see how to set one out. As money is a serious issue I wanted to be professional about it. The invoices varied between each person as they were all involved with the film differently. The first invoice below was billed to someone who took the train to the different shoot locations and the second invoice below was billed to someone who drove to the locations. For the train reimbursement invoice I stated the location in which they started their journey from and the location where the shoot was, once I collected their train ticket I was able to fill out the amount and then add them up to create the balance due. For the fuel reimbursement, I stated my working out to get to their total for each shoot day. Some cast members already worked it out on the mileage reimbursement form so I simply double checked it and others just wrote their milage down so I had to work it out. I sent these along with the reimbursement on the 23rd February (the day after we wrapped) and fortunately, I received no complaints or discrepancies with any of the cast or crew.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The I will fill out these invoices again after the re-shoot and voice over day to continue with my professionalism with the cast.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qhPH2gkZ_cw/XNQFEJTr8mI/AAAAAAAAD9Y/7VZrdqzh9fcywY0sJiQ1jkIf2e6Gz7K9QCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B11.46.16.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1032" data-original-width="1536" height="430" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qhPH2gkZ_cw/XNQFEJTr8mI/AAAAAAAAD9Y/7VZrdqzh9fcywY0sJiQ1jkIf2e6Gz7K9QCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-09%2Bat%2B11.46.16.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Train invoice (left) fuel invoice (right)</span></td></tr></tbody></table>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-25814871906385392442019-03-05T17:04:00.000+00:002019-05-09T23:00:13.544+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Creating Rough Cut 1 & Feedback<b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Creating Rough Cut 1&nbsp;</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">(all shoot days complete)</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Syncing the audio:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">My initial job during the rough cut was to sync the audio. This project was the first time I had used a clapperboard, and as I explained previously, this is a very important method in which to help sync the audio. Katie had set up a Premiere Pro timeline with the correct settings for our footage, and relating back to my research from Anthony Boys, I decided it would be best to continue using her set-up to allow the continuity of the style to flow smoothly while the edit gets passed from Katie to me, and then back to Katie. She had organised the footage from the Kent Owl Academy in separate bins, I continued this when importing the new footage and audio from the most recent shoot week.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Katie started by syncing the audio on one sequence and then went back and fourth with a new sequence when she was ready to start putting the timeline together. I continued using this technique in order to keep the edit simple for when the edit gets passed back for the fine cut.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This was my opportunity to try editing with the silent camera and clapperboard. It wasn't as hard as what I thought as long as the clapperboard was in shot. This was the case for the majority of the takes apart from a couple in the last scene outside the pub, I couldn't see the whole clapperboard and had to estimate when it had been used. Overall, syncing the audio wasn't extremely difficult, but it just took a while to sync all the takes. This took me two full days, which in the scheme of things isn't very long as we have around two months to edit the project. However, I just wanted to get into editing the footage together on the separate timeline in order to see how to looks and if we needed to re-shoot at all. I actually started this process a week before the edit was scheduled on my post-production schedule. After realising that the sync took two full days, I am grateful for starting it earlier as I should be able to stay on schedule or have the rough cut complete earlier than scheduled.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-c0bz8dJZR98/XHQ3R109MnI/AAAAAAAADKA/_zNlavsn86EKvX6upGFYoWfDdBbMBuPXQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-25%2Bat%2B13.21.57.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="791" data-original-width="1600" height="316" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-c0bz8dJZR98/XHQ3R109MnI/AAAAAAAADKA/_zNlavsn86EKvX6upGFYoWfDdBbMBuPXQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-25%2Bat%2B13.21.57.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Syncing the audio</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once the audio was synced, I also had to adjust the audio channels so the sound was coming out of the same side on each channel. This allowed the audio to be played in both headphones and had an even volume level throughout the takes. I adjusted both audio levels so they were coming from the left side.</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-94nNiRNzbN4/XIuIlXhYspI/AAAAAAAADRE/MLtw8A02eYsu-MzNhhcUWSDcglAN7HFMgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B11.11.41.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="808" data-original-width="1278" height="404" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-94nNiRNzbN4/XIuIlXhYspI/AAAAAAAADRE/MLtw8A02eYsu-MzNhhcUWSDcglAN7HFMgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B11.11.41.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Adjusting audio channels&nbsp;</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once the timeline started to come together, I adjusted some additional audio levels. The audio and sound effects come into the edit during the fine cut, however, as I will have control of this rough cut for a while, I felt it was best to change the audio levels so we didn't peak throughout the film. As it is shown in the photo below, when Tim gets into the Vet Van and shuts the&nbsp;door, the audio peaks. As our characters get in and out of the van and shut the side door a number of times throughout the film, this happens a couple of&nbsp;times.&nbsp;However, this is very easy to correct and because of&nbsp;that we&nbsp;didn't have to compromise our sound by&nbsp;having the sound assistant stand away from the characters. Therefore, we still have very clear dialogue for the&nbsp;majority of the film.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To correct the audio level here, I used the pen tool (as shown in the second photo below) and plotted a couple of audio spots before and after the high audio level of the van door. Once these spots were in place, I brought the audio volume down in the section between the spots. I listened to this back to make sure it sounded natural and not edited. I only lowered it slightly as the van door shutting is expected to make a loud noise, I simply wanted to prevent the audio from peaking at this point on the timeline. This</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;was successful, I made sure the van door still made a loud noise but not loud enough to peak.</span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-OOlljUZC2cc/XIa_sRjd0WI/AAAAAAAADP8/hEgBSongUikxE2trztBZyB84Db7DVWA6QCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.05.16.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1044" data-original-width="1390" height="480" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-OOlljUZC2cc/XIa_sRjd0WI/AAAAAAAADP8/hEgBSongUikxE2trztBZyB84Db7DVWA6QCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.05.16.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Audio peaking</span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-fki4LpQmhaw/XIa_rLVcgCI/AAAAAAAADP4/WppCVMFG4AUkC4qJ4llSrkZekDsBptvLgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.05.25.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="414" data-original-width="1392" height="190" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-fki4LpQmhaw/XIa_rLVcgCI/AAAAAAAADP4/WppCVMFG4AUkC4qJ4llSrkZekDsBptvLgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.05.25.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Using the pen tool to lower the volume of the audio</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On shoot day 4 when we filmed the final scene of VET-MAN, we had a slight problem with the natural light. It was relatively cloudy on this shoot day but the sun was shining, this caused the daylight to change very often. It started&nbsp;slightly more dull when the clouds were covering the sun but a few moments later the clouds had moved and the sun was beaming down onto the car park. We&nbsp;realised this half way through the day and to prevent it we tried to shoot the scene twice in order to get two full sequences - one with the sun out and one with the sun covered. If we&nbsp;hadn't realised this, when it came to the edit, I would be constantly cutting between shots with sun and shots without the sun.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once it came to the edit, I&nbsp;remembered the issues we had with the sunlight and tried to make two&nbsp;sequences with the sun and&nbsp;without the sun.&nbsp;Unfortunately, there were a&nbsp;couple of shots which we only had one of so I couldn't make a whole sequence of either sun or no sun. The sun gave a brighter and more pleasing look to the shots - these may be easier to colour grade as well so I was leaning more towards using the sunlight shots, but they were&nbsp;very&nbsp;noticeable with or without the sun. As a&nbsp;result of&nbsp;this, I decided to try and position the shots so the sun came in gradually. This means that&nbsp;the sun&nbsp;won't appear and disappear in consecutive shots, but the sun will not be present at the beginning of the scene and then will appear towards the end of the scene (as shown in the photos below). I was surprisingly happy with this result. I showed Alex and he was also happy with it. We both agreed that this was the best way of approaching the natural light issue in a way which doesn't look too obvious that the light changes. Editing this scene with the sunlight in mind prevented us from needing to consider a re-shoot.&nbsp;</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8bQdq3HTCHA/XIbB2Zc0j9I/AAAAAAAADQc/gXUSx9SdDTYWRA51-tHIONw7PeyMIuw8gCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.14.49.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1136" data-original-width="870" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8bQdq3HTCHA/XIbB2Zc0j9I/AAAAAAAADQc/gXUSx9SdDTYWRA51-tHIONw7PeyMIuw8gCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-11%2Bat%2B20.14.49.png" width="490" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Gradual change in sunlight</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Using jump cuts</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the film, there are a couple of sequences with no dialogue where we are just&nbsp;watching Tim doing something on screen - scenes 1 &amp; 4. In scene 1, Tim has just walked into Tess's house and is looking for her laptop to print his fake diploma. Here we are watching Tim&nbsp;rummage through her front room drawers and look under the sofa to find the&nbsp;laptop. To show Tim printing the diploma I put together a sequence of events including Tim&nbsp;putting the&nbsp;laptop down on top of the printer, taking the&nbsp;USB stick out of his pocket, putting it into the laptop, watching him use the touch pad on the laptop, and finally pressing print on the screen. I initially put the footage together so it was a lot longer, just so I could get each shot down on the timeline for the assembly cut. However, f</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">or a&nbsp;comedy which needs to be fast-paced, this seemed to be quite a slow and uninteresting sequence.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I felt that we needed to get to the point of the fake diploma quicker. I&nbsp;liaised with Alex once the assembly cut was complete and I wanted to start refining the shots and shortening scenes. I suggested a couple of jump cuts so we just see the&nbsp;important parts of the sequence, such as putting the&nbsp;laptop&nbsp;down on the printer, getting the USB out and putting it into the printer, rather than actually watching the sequence showing him getting to each of these points. For example instead of seeing him put his hand in his pocket, we'll just see him take out the USB. Alex agreed that this would be the best way to&nbsp;approach this slower-paced sequence. He said that the jump cuts&nbsp;could signify Tim being in his own world as a successful vet, and then once we go back to full sequences, this is when we are back in real life where he is a failed vet.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Alex also said that he&nbsp;particularly&nbsp;didn't&nbsp;want to see the misspelt word - VETT - on the&nbsp;laptop screen, instead he wanted the word to be revealed when Tess turns the diploma round and tells Tim that he's spelt it wrong. I felt&nbsp;that this was a good idea,&nbsp;because if I am using jump cuts to signify being in Tim's mind and believing that he is a successful vet, the misspelt word&nbsp;wouldn't fit in with this if the audience then saw it during this sequence. As a result of this, I was able to&nbsp;jump from seeing Tim's hand using the touchpad to then pressing the print button.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-8cP-azrVgME/XIu1jEzyYaI/AAAAAAAADRQ/pk99biPt2SEz8Wqf2zSzSw5IPWgYc2hRgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B14.23.07.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="407" data-original-width="1600" height="162" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-8cP-azrVgME/XIu1jEzyYaI/AAAAAAAADRQ/pk99biPt2SEz8Wqf2zSzSw5IPWgYc2hRgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B14.23.07.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-n_DwWI2SbBw/XIu1o0J2JdI/AAAAAAAADRU/S5cxq9rhi3A3PqMYqUwOlz0Yg-gGzLpVACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B14.23.34.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="778" data-original-width="1572" height="316" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-n_DwWI2SbBw/XIu1o0J2JdI/AAAAAAAADRU/S5cxq9rhi3A3PqMYqUwOlz0Yg-gGzLpVACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B14.23.34.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Revealing VETT</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Following this advice from Alex, I&nbsp;applied the jump cuts to the surgical scene in the back of the van in Scene 4. We shot a sequence where Tim puts on the surgical gloves and mask and&nbsp;prepares the dog for&nbsp;surgery. Again, I used the jump cuts to signify being in Tim's mind where he believes he is being a successful vet. Subsequently, once we hear Sheila calling for Sooty I created full sequences and stop creating the jump cuts.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8ebS1VX3F_c/XIu4lH9Bk9I/AAAAAAAADRk/4WkT08079RoIELyIcx2M7FKZovciLCIoACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B14.36.19.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="866" data-original-width="1600" height="346" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8ebS1VX3F_c/XIu4lH9Bk9I/AAAAAAAADRk/4WkT08079RoIELyIcx2M7FKZovciLCIoACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B14.36.19.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Screenshots of jump cuts in Scene 4 (surgery on dog in Van)</td></tr></tbody></table></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Gaining inspiration from <i>The Thick Of It</i></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><i><br /></i></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As explained in my research I looked into <i>The Thick Of It </i>to note down their editing techniques. I felt this was necessary&nbsp;because it is our main inspiration for VET-MAN and how we want our film to be edited. I already knew that one way to bring comedy across is holding reaction shots so I was doing this wherever it could fit, but I wanted to see if <i>The Thick Of It </i>used any other techniques&nbsp;that I could replicate. While watching the series, I found that they really&nbsp;emphasise the zooms and pans in the edit. It is shot with the intention of using these camera movements but they use them&nbsp;in the episodes many times, rather than cutting them out. Katie shot our footage with intentional zooms and pans so I have used as many as I can in the edit, rather than cutting them out. They were used to help bring the comedy&nbsp;across so they are going to be included in the edit regardless,&nbsp;however,&nbsp;occasionally&nbsp;I held onto shots for slightly longer to get these camera movements in. For example, there is a shot where Katie is sat in the back of the stationary van when Luke opens the side door&nbsp;after they've hit the dog. He then runs round to the back of the van to get the tools for Tim so Katie&nbsp;pans his&nbsp;movement, then when he gets the screwdrivers out, she pans back to Tim's reaction for the line - "it's not a fu*king flatpack Luke. Stethoscope". I was deciding between removing the pan and just cutting back to Tim but I kept the pan in to reflect our&nbsp;inspiration of <i>The Thick Of It</i>. The camera doesn't quite get back to Tim before he&nbsp;says his line,&nbsp;however, this is&nbsp;something that I noticed when watching <i>The Thick Of It</i>, the camera seems to chase the action as some of the time there's so much&nbsp;going on at once. I understand this may change&nbsp;throughout the course of the edit, but I have kept it in for now to&nbsp;reflect our inspiration, I will see what Alex says and change it accordingly if&nbsp;needed.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Our footage is not quite as shaky as <i>The Thick Of It, </i>however,&nbsp;because I know the idea of&nbsp;handheld is to get that specific look I&nbsp;didn't have to&nbsp;concern&nbsp;myself with any really shaky footage as I knew that was the style we wanted. I also noticed that they&nbsp;hold the shots for an amount of time and then zoom rather than zoom while changing shots.&nbsp;There were a couple of shots that I cut together where the zooms were too close together which meant it was&nbsp;harder to see where the focus was meant to be. As a result of&nbsp;this, each zoom I&nbsp;incorporated into the edit, I made sure the camera was still before and after the zoom before&nbsp;cutting again to&nbsp;prevent too&nbsp;much movement in the cuts. Although <i>The Thick Of It </i>are known for their quick cuts which add to the comedy, they hold shots where needed. I took this&nbsp;point on into our edit and held reaction shots that added to the story, such as the Sheila's close up when Tim puts his blood stained hand on her&nbsp;shoulder. He puts his hand on her left shoulder which is away&nbsp;from the&nbsp;camera, ideally, it would have been better if he had put his hand on the right shoulder&nbsp;which was facing the camera.&nbsp;Nevertheless, her reaction is still&nbsp;appropriate for what's happening in the scene so I felt it was&nbsp;essential for the comedy to hold her reaction while Tim is&nbsp;taking with his hand on her&nbsp;shoulder.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Comparison to post-production schedule&nbsp;made in pre-production unit</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In order to involve the post-production schedule I made in the Pre-Production unit, I made a comparison of what I said would happen during the editing stage, and what has actually happened. I also aim to update the post-production schedule to do a full comparison towards the end of the Major Project unit.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">When I created the post-production unit, I gave us a week's break between filming and editing, however, once I actually got to the end of filming I found that the weekend was enough time off and I was eager to get in and start editing the film together. In addition to this, now I have experienced all of our shoot days, getting the edit started quicker will also help determine what we need to re-shoot - if we do at all. As a result of this, I started the edit on the 25th February rather than the 4th March. I am very glad that I did start the edit earlier than scheduled now as I said previously, because I didn't realise how long syncing the audio would take. I didn't take this into consideration when planning the post-production schedule. As I was creating it months prior to editing or even filming, I wasn't completely clear on each step I needed to take during the edit. There is room for the post-production schedule to change due to the large amount of time that we have to edit the film. Again, I didn't realise how much time we would actually have after filming, and as a result of this, I have kept onto the rough cut slightly longer than I scheduled, giving me more time to perfect the rough cut so Katie can go straight into refining audio, adding sound effects and colour grading.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-iOmVoE5cIIA/XIu_GsV9G9I/AAAAAAAADSE/4lj76QhaLI4aW9kBe2G75ej5Mh1fj_QaQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B15.04.41.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="900" data-original-width="864" height="400" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-iOmVoE5cIIA/XIu_GsV9G9I/AAAAAAAADSE/4lj76QhaLI4aW9kBe2G75ej5Mh1fj_QaQCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-15%2Bat%2B15.04.41.png" width="383" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Current changes to post-production schedule</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I synced the&nbsp;audio on Monday 25th Feb &amp; Tuesday 26th Feb, and started putting the footage together onto a&nbsp;separate timeline on Wednesday 27th Feb. Friday was the first day where I sat with Alex to show him what I had done to the edit so far and he was please with the amount of footage that was on the timeline that early on. He gave me a few early pointers and I corrected them on the timeline. I will aim to export the first draft and send it to him so he can watch it through fully and make notes and corrections for me to work on.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I had finished putting everything on the timeline in the correct order by Monday 4th March, ready for our first rough cut viewing on Tuesday 5th March. Relating back to my research about assembly cuts, this video is essentially my assembly cut, however, I added in a bit of refinement as I had the time. I put everything down on the timeline and then showed Alex so he could see whether or not I was going in the correct direction. After the viewing with Simon, I continued to make edits and corrections to start rough cut 2.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Rough Cut 1 (assembly cut with a bit of refinement)</b></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="YOUTUBE-iframe-video" data-thumbnail-src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/owJJq8IT7oQ/0.jpg" frameborder="0" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/owJJq8IT7oQ?feature=player_embedded" width="711"></iframe></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to the upcoming tutorial with Simon, I wanted to export the timeline once I had each scene worked out however, I still had a few tweaks to make so I made my own notes to work on after the tutorial.</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">My notes:</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- ADR for owl punch &amp; Kent Owl Acad. car park scenes<br />- Shot of slogan on van when Tim looks at it in scene 2<br />- Crop door out of shot before they hit the dog<br />- Close up of bag dropping<br />- Remove black on Sheila’s house scene<br />- Can’t see Tim’s hand movements in night scene<br />- Add general audio to night scene</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Simon's notes:<br />- How do we know Tim has broken into the house?<br />- Didn't get the sense of the more successful sister from photos <br />- Good decision to not show VETT <br />- No sense of specialness of the bag <br />- Tighten scene 2 <br />- Car reversing from drive is too long - coverage / something happen? <br />- Light changing on their faces in the van <br />- Driving scene before dog hit will work once edit finishes <br />- Luke’s character is a little over the top - cut around it? <br />- NEED to see a dog on the floor &amp; Tim looking at dog in van - not believable at the moment <br />- Dog hit scene looks rushed <br />- There is enough moments to understand the importance of the father <br />- Show Mollie getting angry <br />- On Tim tighter in pub cheers &amp; VET-BOY reaction <br />- On Tim’s face more in pub <br />- End on Tim’s face not van?<br />- See van shoot past Academy and reverse in? <br /><br />Simon was very impressed to see a rough cut at this early stage. This made me realise that starting the edit a week earlier than scheduled was a good idea. I was also happy with this comment as I had put in a lot of work in the first week of the edit to get it to this stage.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In addition to this, Simon didn't notice the change in sunlight in the final scene in the pub car park, therefore, I believe I did a good job in gradually bringing in the sun.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After the viewing I liaised with both Alex and Katie to get their thoughts on the feedback. As the editor, I need to know where I am going with the edit, whether they liked each one of the feedback points, or whether I am only changing a few of them. To tighten scene 2 was one I agreed with as the whole film needs tightening before it's choppy enough to add to the comedy aspect. I also agreed with the point about the van reversing off the drive and that it's too long and doesn't fit with the rest of the film. Unfortunately, we only had the wide shot listed for the coverage here, so that's the only shot we have of the van reversing off the drive. Instead of worrying ourselves with coverage, Alex suggested a bit of voice over to cover the shot so the audience are listening to something rather than sat watching a van drive away. I was eager to try this as it may add to the story and is easier than getting more coverage now. The light changing on their faces in the van is something that will be fixed in the fine cut. We liaised about the comment of Dan's character being a bit over the top, and we quite liked the personality he gives off as Luke as we want it to be a bit overenthusiastic, it combines well with his innocence that we originally wanted to come through in his character. I understand that we may have too many comments from Luke after Tim has said something, so I could change these around. <br /><br />After getting advice in the tutorial, we have decided to re-shoot scenes 4 and 6 (possibly 5) in Margate. Simon expected to see a shot of a dog in the film as in the script Alex had stated that we hit a dog, therefore, this had to be shown. We spoke about this as a group and decided to shoot the dog footage in a different location to Margate, as I have no access to a dog here, but Katie and Alex do in their areas. However, we will be bringing the cast and crew back to Margate for the re-shoot as there were a couple of shots that Katie wasn't happy with and we weren't completely happy with the blood splatter due to being short of time on the first attempt in Margate. Although the re-arrangment for the initial Margate shoot was unavoidable and occurred a few days before, I will ensure the cast are available all day, and if they think they may become busy then we will change the day. We don't want to re-shoot for a second time in the furthest and most expensive location. In case we want to re-use any shots from the main shoot week, it is ideal to do the re-shoot in the original location, which we are. This will prevent the pressure of re-shooting everything if we were happy with it originally.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We also may get a shot of Tim and Luke inside the Vet Van noticing the Kent Owl Academy sign and turning into the site. These shots aren't as important but will be beneficial towards the story if we were able to get it.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We thought we had solved the sunlight problem on shoot day 4, however during the edit I realised that we hadn't got every single take twice - with the sun and without the sun. As a result of this, I had to try and gradually bring the sun out into the scene. This would have been prevented if I had a successful method in making sure we had each shot twice. I had the shot list making sure we had each take, but reflecting back on the shoot day I should have marked the paper to make sure we had captured each shot twice, rather than just ticking off the fact that we recorded the shot listed. Nonetheless, bringing the sun out gradually worked quite well and no one has criticised it so fortunately it was fixable.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I was impressed with my idea of using jump cuts, and it makes sense with the idea of being inside Tim's mind. I think the jump cuts also suit the choppy tone of the film which is another benefit.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I felt that I used <i>The Thick Of It's </i>editing technique well in the first rough cut. This was helped by the similar style footage including zooms and pans. I followed their example of using the handheld and really shaky footage to my advantage, and I held appropriate reaction shots.&nbsp;</span></div></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-71231552025909099942019-02-25T14:58:00.000+00:002019-05-09T23:00:04.117+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Developing the Marketing for VET-MAN<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During my tutorial after the pre-production unit, I was advised to develop the marketing for VET-MAN, it wasn't creative enough and the post-production stage will be a good opportunity to market the film, ready for the release date. I explained that I did struggle with this part of producing and I was advised to contact a couple of people to ask for their opinions.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I tried to contact our own adverting and marketing students at UCA via the official Facebook page, unfortunately my post didn't get authorised. I wasn't sure on another way to contact people from the campus as we aren't based there. I also asked around people on my course to see if they knew any of the advertising and marketing students and no one did.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As a result of this, I had to start looking further afield which is when I was inspired to talk to <b>Emily</b>.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I studied A-level</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;art with Emily at school.</span><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">She is currently studying</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;Fashion Communication and Promotion at Norwich University of the Arts.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Unfortunately she also didn't know any marketing or advertising students who specifically studied in that field but she had her own ideas. As she studies fashion communication and promotion, she also has to market her work herself, and over her time at University she has learnt different methods of how to promote her own work. I felt that she was more an adequate to get advice from. She asked what I was trying to market. I explained about VET-MAN and the marketing research I had conducted already which wasn't quite creative enough. She continued with the following:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><u><br /></u></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>"You would want to research into your customer and who they are. So if&nbsp;you're&nbsp;targeting a specific audience you would market in a specific way. E.g if you wanted to target the millennial then you want to use ethical and emotive campaign strategies spread out across social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook and go more creative like somehow creating art installations like projecting into a wall at night in a busy London street near a location your customer goes to. But if it were an older customer like Generation X or a Baby Boomer (40/65+ years old) then they have a completely different marketing&nbsp;approach. Like they like to consume in different ways so you would appeal through Facebook but aimed more at practicability and use of a product rather than its materials and ethical sourcing. Obviously this might not be helpful for your film."</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I explained that that was helpful to know. I next asked what approach she would take first if she was given something to market.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>"I would research your target audience and how to reach them and in what approach. Use marketing tools like AIDA and SWOT analysis. The 7 Ps of promotion etc. They help you break down the customer. Then once you've analysed your customer you can market to them in the appropriate way. The future is experience over&nbsp;buying though so create an&nbsp;experimental marketing&nbsp;technique for your film. A pop up room in the middle of a London Street with&nbsp;your film projected onto sensory walls or screen images printed on to coffee cups and fed to local bars. That would&nbsp;appeal to Millennials."</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I said that due to our target audience being 16-30, I feel as if social media is the main and will be the most successful way to market the film.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>"I would&nbsp;market in different ways that aren't predictable. Think outside the&nbsp;box of social media. Think in store event. Hiring a coffee shop and projecting into walls. A one off old school movie theatre. A trailer in your local&nbsp;independent cinema. Printing screen grabs or cinematography cuts onto coffee cups and movie posters painted onto walls. Stickers of your movie branded into a name or a sketch of your key character made into a sticker and stuck to a&nbsp;lamp post throughout your town. Use a key&nbsp;hashtag to link it all that will lead to a social media page."</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After talking to Emily about marketing and promotion, I asked if she would&nbsp;like to create some illustrations for our film. As I know Emily, I follow her social&nbsp;media pages and she is&nbsp;regularly posting fashion&nbsp;illustrations that she is working on. She agreed to create illustrations for VET-MAN which I can use for marketing and promotional purposes. She seemed really keen and she was very helpful so I believe that she will create good content for me to distribute.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Now I have established that Emily is going to create illustrations for me, I felt that I needed more advice from someone who works in the marketing field. They may bring up different ideas which may lead onto more inspiration. As well as trying to post on the UCA Facebook page, I tried</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;to&nbsp;contact marketing and advertising students from UCA but I was unsuccessful. I had to continue thinking of different ways in which to get advice on marketing. As I am currently working on my LinkedIn profile for job opportunities, I felt that this would be the next best way to contact people who are&nbsp;experienced in this field. I simply searched marketing and a couple of names came up - in particular <b>Oscar</b>. Oscar is a f</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">ilm researcher, who works within marketing and distribution. He also studied at the University&nbsp;of Kent which is local to me.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I started with the same information I discussed with Emily. I explained that I needed to market my film for University and asked if he had any advice for me.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>"You need to figure out what the "story" of your film is - is there a really interesting behind-the-scenes narrative about how the story was developed? is it based on a true story? was there something really special about how it was made, or who made it? Your film is just another film among millions - why should I spend time watching your film?"</i></span><br /><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></i><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">"For a production of this scale, social media is going to be pretty much the only worthwhile way to market. You should focus your efforts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Reddit - the latter is a seriously overlooked marketing platform. I suggest collecting as much material as possible before you begin posting (poster, trailer, BTS photos, promotional stills etc.) writing up a document with a proper schedule of what you will be posting and when."</i><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>"On Facebook make sure you have an eye-catching profile picture and cover photo, invite all your friends and get the cast and crew to do the same. So you'll hopefully have a solid base of likes to start off. Only post once a day, in line with the algorithm - anything more than that and you're less likely to show up on people's feeds. On Twitter the best way to gain followers is to follow as many relevant people from your account as possible e.g. if your film is a horror film, follow journalists from horror websites, horror directors and actors from the last 40 years etc. Instagram is the same - identify 1-2 hashtags and use them frequently e.g. on your last movie it would have been #vetman and say, #studentfilm."</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">You previously mentioned Reddit. Could you explain a bit more about this platform as I've never heard of it before?</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>"Reddit works completely differently. It's essentially a host for millions of different "subreddits" - communities / message boards for any weirdly specific thing you can think of. Identify the subreddits most likely to respond to your movie (e.g. horror movies if it's a horror, filmmaking etc.) Start posting in a few of them so you're part of these "communities" before asking them to watch your film. If they know you're there to promote stuff they're not likely to respond well. Reddit is a platform where stuff can go viral, so it's well worth learning more about how it works. If you have any money in your budget for marketing, put it into advertising on Facebook and Twitter. Twitter's advertising isn't as favourable but it can be effective, it just doesn't let you target as specifically as Facebook."</i></span><br /><i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"Facebook is far more cost-effective and you can target who you&nbsp;want to see certain posts. For example, you can pay for your trailer to reach female fans of football,&nbsp;lasagne and Odeon cinemas within a 25 mile radius of Nottingham, aged 28-43. The more&nbsp;specific you get the most likely you are to reach people who will watch your movie."</span></i><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">What do you recommend doing first in order to market a film well?</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"Most&nbsp;importantly, as you'll be promoting on these platforms, figure out the "voice" of the movie. Is it a comedy, where posts should be kept light-hearted? Or a&nbsp;mystery so posts are written in a compelling way? Or a horror and the&nbsp;posts can be a warning? Figure out the USP (unique selling point) of your project and push that - is someone well-known involved? Is it a&nbsp;crazy genre like an LGBT&nbsp;sci-fi western romantic anthology? is it a&nbsp;concept no one's ever seen before? Find social media accounts for shorts and features that are similar to yours, and see how&nbsp;they've done it and crucially, if they have big followings online.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Spend some time building up to the release of things like the poster and trailer - a 5-day countdown, with a striking image once a day for 5 days&nbsp;usually builds anticipation. This can apply to all platforms (maybe not on Reddit though)."</span></i><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif; font-style: italic;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I continued by sending over my Advertising and Marketing blog post from to Oscar so he&nbsp;could see what I researched into and wrote about in the pre-production unit. By doing this, he could tell me where I went wrong and what is missing to create a successful marketing plan:&nbsp;</span><br /><i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">"Nothing immediately leaps out to me as having a USP so I guess you create a poster and trailer being very&nbsp;confident in the kind of tone it is trying to strike. I would very much advise Reddit for a start. Not enough people utilise it as a marketing tool. Perhaps create&nbsp;fictional accounts for your lead character or a veterinary practice? Maybe create a fictional advert&nbsp;for veterinary college or clinic that's quite gruesome, like what your lead character does? I think your next step should be to research the&nbsp;marketing campaign and online presence of films that are similar to yours... and really understand the tone of your film."</span></i><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As Oscar was so passionate about me looking into Reddit, I decided to research further into it. I found that it is an&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">American social news aggregation, web content rating, and discussion website. I also created an account under VET-MAN, however, I realised that I think I would use this more of a revision tool to communicate with people surrounding marketing, rather than be able to market the film on there. This will</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;still beneficial because I may be able to see how other pages market their&nbsp;products and gain some&nbsp;inspiration for myself.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I found the idea that Oscar suggested of creating a marketing schedule interesting as it will help me establish whether I am marketing regularly or not, and whether I am giving enough for each stage in production. For example, I may have only shared a couple of posts during the pre-production stage, but have over-shared in production. By making a schedule I can keep a record of the balance in my marketing.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I took on some more of the&nbsp;advice from Oscar by looking at other short comedy&nbsp;films to see how they market their films. Initially, I took to the VET-MAN Instagram&nbsp;page and started searching for tags which are relevant to our film. I used the tags that I have been using on the social media at the moment such as #shortfilm, #studentfilm, #filmmaking, #shortcomedy etc. I found this would be the best way to find other pages that are creating the same sort of film that we are. Using the tags will then lead me to find names of other films as I wouldn't know any to search for before this process. Once I have names of similar films I can research further into their marketing techniques by searching for their Facebook and Twitter pages.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-v0YWJz9lEGY/XK0IAIAFHGI/AAAAAAAADfc/BXHub41f0VAXEUXbADtJZ-UbmMHEGWoOACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B21.59.30.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="900" data-original-width="1078" height="534" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-v0YWJz9lEGY/XK0IAIAFHGI/AAAAAAAADfc/BXHub41f0VAXEUXbADtJZ-UbmMHEGWoOACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B21.59.30.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Finding similar Instagram accounts</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I was searching #shortfilm and #studentfilm to find similar accounts, however I wasn't inspired by any to follow their marketing techniques. While I was looking I thought back to a student I went to Canterbury UCA with who also went to&nbsp;University to take&nbsp;on a film degree. Him and his friends were creating a dark comedy called <i>A Christmas Cracker</i>. This immediately caught my attention and I went&nbsp;straight onto&nbsp;their Instagram account to see their style and technique. I really liked the type of posts they were sharing, they were posting regularly and keeping their followers up to date. This is a bigger production than ours, and they have been in&nbsp;production for longer than ours which&nbsp;explains the amount of content and followers&nbsp;they have.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Looking at their posts gave me&nbsp;inspiration for a few marketing&nbsp;techniques, such as cast and crew introductions. Instead of&nbsp;heading&nbsp;straight for the&nbsp;photos&nbsp;including the crew, they have taken their time to&nbsp;introduce each crew member, as it can be seen in the screenshot below. The boxes outlined in red are each of their crew introductions. Unfortunately, I have already posted on the&nbsp;social media pages about our test shoots in the previous unit,&nbsp;however, I can adapt these so they introduce the crew in a similar way to <i>A Christmas Cracker</i>. I like the style and aesthetics of the crew introductions where they are all in Christmas clothes and have Christmas decoration around them. The&nbsp;photos I got during the test shoots feature us working - Alex is writing the script, Katie is filming the owls and I am sorting out risk assessments. Although we&nbsp;aren't posed in the same way&nbsp;similarly to <i>A Christmas Cracker, </i>we are all doing our job role which is still a good&nbsp;marketing technique where our followers can see us in action. If I had conducted this research in the pre-production unit, I could have got photos of us holding an owl at the academy one at a time, and then there would be the same look to each of the crew introductions. I would have also got photos of Alix and Katthaylia so I could feature their own crew&nbsp;introduction. Nevertheless, I have featured posts about us three crew members,&nbsp;which is a similar idea that <i>A&nbsp;Christmas Cracker </i>have done for&nbsp;their account. I will plan to adapt&nbsp;the posts I have already shared to explain more of what we are about individually.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-lvRTU-I462o/XK0IBqnDkpI/AAAAAAAADfk/vBPJWhZP1TcXQQ6tRZIY0y07nKDiiabygCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B20.07.02.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="923" data-original-width="1134" height="520" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-lvRTU-I462o/XK0IBqnDkpI/AAAAAAAADfk/vBPJWhZP1TcXQQ6tRZIY0y07nKDiiabygCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B20.07.02.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">A Christmas Cracker Instagram</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-u-S5wFbjuKk/XK0Tjc2PdSI/AAAAAAAADg0/QJcPuVzEk3wJxS9JfvPIYsaMZOX6PCK8gCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.49.33.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="880" data-original-width="790" height="400" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-u-S5wFbjuKk/XK0Tjc2PdSI/AAAAAAAADg0/QJcPuVzEk3wJxS9JfvPIYsaMZOX6PCK8gCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.49.33.png" width="358" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Countdown marketing technique</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Another feature of <i>A Christmas Crackers' </i>Instagram page is the countdown they include when they are about to announce&nbsp;something new to their followers. The countdown shown in the photo on the right is when they counted down until their&nbsp;crowd funder went live. I thought the countdown&nbsp;was a good idea,&nbsp;however I&nbsp;wasn't sure&nbsp;if it was necessary&nbsp;for the crowd&nbsp;funder. When I started our own GoFundMe I wanted to get it posted immediately to get the most time out of it. I&nbsp;didn't consider doing a countdown. Nevertheless, this is&nbsp;definitely&nbsp;something I would think about in future marketing roles. The countdown idea was also mentioned by Oscar, he suggested to 'spend time building up to the release of&nbsp;things like the poster or trailer - a 5-day countdown, with a striking image once a day usually&nbsp;builds anticipation'. As I have seen this marketing technique twice&nbsp;throughout my research, I will definitely use it for VET-MAN. We aren't doing a trailer, but I could do a countdown for the poster. If not, I will&nbsp;definitely schedule a countdown for the release of the film. As we would have completed the unit before we can release the film, I will plan what I want to release and set it up ready to go on Buffer. Buffer is the social media&nbsp;scheduling tool I&nbsp;discovered in the pre-production&nbsp;package. During&nbsp;the previous unit, I couldn't see myself using it much. However, it is a good tool to use to&nbsp;help the posts share at the same time each day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To further&nbsp;research into <i>A Christmas Cracker, </i>I&nbsp;searched for their Facebook page and liked it. By doing this, I will be able to see&nbsp;updates as they post&nbsp;which may&nbsp;inspire me for&nbsp;different marketing techniques that I could use. As Oscar also advised, their profile picture and header are interesting and stand out. Their branding and style is clear and this matches throughout their social media&nbsp;accounts. I looked further into their Facebook account and noticed that the posts are the same as the Instagram. This is one of the&nbsp;reasons I found their other social&nbsp;media pages to see whether they post different content or keep it the same. I found that it is the&nbsp;same on both social media pages, but I understand that they would reach a different type of audience posting on Facebook than they would on Instagram. Relating back to what Emily said depending on our target age range.&nbsp;Millennials would be best&nbsp;targeted through all the different social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, however, the older generation are more likely to only have Facebook accounts, but they like to 'consume in different ways'. Emily's example was for the older generation Facebook will be easier to target, but the posts would be aimed more at practicability and the use of a product rather than it's materials and ethical sourcing. As she said this doesn't really apply to our film, but it was a good example to show me how to look at the ways in which I can appeal to different&nbsp;audiences over the social media platforms.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-WSc5r_irl4k/XK0JwlEwq9I/AAAAAAAADf8/IhS71fR7ms4HyJsvN8jTU3PDmtucI9dEACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.07.41.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1044" data-original-width="1172" height="570" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-WSc5r_irl4k/XK0JwlEwq9I/AAAAAAAADf8/IhS71fR7ms4HyJsvN8jTU3PDmtucI9dEACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.07.41.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">A Christmas Cracker Facebook page</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we are targeting 16-30 year olds, I believe that I should continue posting on our Facebook and Instagram. The younger side to that age range will be most interested in the Instagram, whereas the older side to our age range may be likely to look at Facebook. Similarly to <i>A Christmas Cracker, </i>I would like to continue posting the same content on both platforms to appeal to both the younger side to our age range and the older side.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To extend my research, I looked into more than one other account. The second one I first discovered on Twitter and then I found their Instagram account to have a look into their marketing techniques. The name of the Instagram is the company, the Laughing Mirror Theatre and they are currently creating a play called <i>Detective Inspector.</i>&nbsp;They create new plays quite regularly and they market them all on this one Instagram account. Although they create plays and not films, the plays they create are usually comedies which is similar to VET-MAN. Looking at at their Instagram page, their photos are more raw and less staged than&nbsp;<i>A Christmas Cracker. </i>These type of photos are more like our own. Ours aren't posed or edited and they mainly made up of action shots and BTS from test shoots and shoot days. Although,&nbsp;<i>A Christmas Cracker's </i>Instagram is&nbsp;extremely organised and their style matches throughout I felt that our photos match The laughing Mirror Theatre companies<i>&nbsp;</i>more so. As a result of this, I felt that I could use our photos in the same way as theirs.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-TNVJWZ8-p_g/XK0SFWoa06I/AAAAAAAADgc/Tvmv3MykKrsKg6G-zJOJNec5QQYStTfMgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.41.41.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="936" data-original-width="1124" height="532" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-TNVJWZ8-p_g/XK0SFWoa06I/AAAAAAAADgc/Tvmv3MykKrsKg6G-zJOJNec5QQYStTfMgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.41.41.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The&nbsp;laughing Mirror Theatre Instagram account</span></td></tr></tbody></table><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-S1PQ_GZENXQ/XK0SzDQJl1I/AAAAAAAADgs/e5aSg_pauLkgNOyzwoTVC3WVsTM-yzqbgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.46.27.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><br /></a><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-S1PQ_GZENXQ/XK0SzDQJl1I/AAAAAAAADgs/e5aSg_pauLkgNOyzwoTVC3WVsTM-yzqbgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.46.27.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="750" data-original-width="792" height="377" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-S1PQ_GZENXQ/XK0SzDQJl1I/AAAAAAAADgs/e5aSg_pauLkgNOyzwoTVC3WVsTM-yzqbgCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-09%2Bat%2B22.46.27.png" width="400" /></a><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once I had established the look of The Laughing Mirror Theatre companies&nbsp;Instagram I looked at each individual post to see how they shared them to&nbsp;their followers. Oscar suggests finding the 'voice' of the&nbsp;film and marketing the posts in that way. For&nbsp;example, if it's a comedy the posts can be kept light-hearted, or if it's a&nbsp;horror the&nbsp;posts can come across as a warning to the&nbsp;viewer. VET-MAN is a comedy so I agree&nbsp;that the posts can be light-hearted to link with the tone of the film. As The Laughing Mirror Theatre company have&nbsp;similar styled photos as us, I wanted to see&nbsp;how they&nbsp;captioned their posts.&nbsp;I&nbsp;noticed that they try to&nbsp;relate to the&nbsp;audience when sharing on their&nbsp;social media pages. For example, the&nbsp;screenshot on&nbsp;the right of the girl looking shocked and&nbsp;concerned is captioned - 'Don't end up looking as concerned as .... does here, book in advance for Midsummer Herders' - this was their current play at the time of this photo being posted. I would like to incorporate our followers by doing the same thing. During the shoot week we shot a many BTS photos and&nbsp;stills where the characters had different facial expressions. For example, Tess' expressions were usually&nbsp;from rolling her eyes or&nbsp;sighing after hearing about another silly story&nbsp;from Tim. A screenshot of her expression could be used&nbsp;on a photo captioned - 'Don't look so fed up like Tess here, only two more weeks until VET-MAN release date!'.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">(This blog post is focused on my research into different marketing techniques. All of our own marketing techniques will be shown and explained in blog post - </span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Marketing VET-MAN).</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection&nbsp;</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- It was beneficial to follow Oscar's advice to look for other short films similar to VET-MAN in terms of their tone and styling. I was able to take inspiration from both <i>A Christmas Cracker </i>and the Laughing Mirror Theatre company, such as cast and crew introductions and relating the posts to the followers, which I am eager to bring into my own marketing for VET-MAN.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Contacting Emily and Oscar was beneficial to get other opinions on what I could do to market creatively. I am currently waiting back from Emily for the illustrations that I can use to promote VET-MAN on the social media sites. I also want to market the film in the street rather than just online by using her example of printing the illustrations onto adhesive paper and sticking them on lamp posts and coffee cups in a local cafe. I researched into the actual millennial age and found that it is between 22-37 which is a section of our target audience which is good as the majority of my marketing on social media and on the street will be aimed at that age group. The group before this, 16-22 will be easier to target on social media platforms which I have been consistently doing throughout pre-production and production.&nbsp;</span>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-83632326140479119652019-02-22T20:57:00.000+00:002019-05-09T22:59:36.694+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Shoot Day 5 & 6<b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">SHOOT DAY 5 - Tess's house</span></b><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">SCENE 1</span></b><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Cast</span></b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim Stewart - <i>Ed Allenby</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tess Connolly <i>- Skevy Stylia</i></span><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Crew</span></b><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Producer - Melissa&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director - Alex</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">DoP - Katie</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Runner - Aidan Robinson-Jones</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sound assistant - Alix Mottershead</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On-set dresser - Harriet Gadd</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Props</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Photos of Skevy</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Frames</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Printer</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Diploma</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- UBS stick</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Macbook</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Doctors bag</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We decided to have some photos of Skevy for Tim to pick up as if he was thinking about his successful older sister. We needed to get the photos from Skevy so she sent them over to us before the shoot&nbsp;day and we put them in frames, ready for Harriet to&nbsp;place them in the living room of the house&nbsp;wherever Alex wants them. In the script read through I asked Skevy if she had any impressive photos and gave the example of being on top of a mountain.&nbsp;Funnily enough, Skevy actually had a photo on top of a mountain from when she was abroad,&nbsp;and fortunately enough for us she allowed us to use it in the film, along with a graduation photo and another one in another country. Once the shoot day was complete we gave her the photos as we&nbsp;wouldn't use them again, and&nbsp;because they're of her it make&nbsp;sense to return them.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We need a printer for Tim to print his fake diploma off, the printer doesn't have to work as we will add in sound effects for the&nbsp;believability of the scene. Alex had a wireless&nbsp;printer so he brought it with him and we sat the&nbsp;laptop on top of it.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The fake diploma was an idea from the beginning of the&nbsp;project, then it got faded out&nbsp;before Alex brought it back again in the most&nbsp;recent script. I had created the fake&nbsp;diploma at the&nbsp;beginning and&nbsp;fortunately kept it so we were able to&nbsp;use the same one. I just had to change some&nbsp;features on it which have developed over the course of the project (blog post&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Props and Costume Shopping List</i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">). The diploma looked really effective as it was a good copy of a real one, apart from the big spelling mistake - VETT. I had one&nbsp;of these&nbsp;printed ready for the&nbsp;shoot day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Costume</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This shoot date consisted of us filming the first scene of the story, which means it will be the first time the audience see the characters and their costumes. Tim is wearing the scrubs and hoodie as he hasn't got any blood stains on them yet, this comes later in the story. Tess is wearing her smart clothing as she is getting ready ready for work. This includes the same clothes she was wearing at the pub, but without the coat as we were filming inside. We were fortunate enough to have all normal costumes for the characters as I'm sure they appreciated that in the cold weather.</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-B0Ac-I9Zk1c/XHL8WPF2ZTI/AAAAAAAADHo/NKPSf53zCtYKc4dxTRNSr3IfNaZP6CEFwCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_3939.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-B0Ac-I9Zk1c/XHL8WPF2ZTI/AAAAAAAADHo/NKPSf53zCtYKc4dxTRNSr3IfNaZP6CEFwCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_3939.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Location</b><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Initially in the pre-production unit, we&nbsp;weren't sure if we able to use this house due to an ongoing extension. In the photos in our pre-production package, the room is full of boxes and not suitable for filming. However, I was confident that the room we wanted to use would be empty by the time we came to the production period, and I was correct. This meant that I&nbsp;didn't have to find an alternative&nbsp;location as this house was ideal for our film. In previous script drafts, the&nbsp;idea was for Tim to look as if he had just&nbsp;jumped through the window, which is why we wanted a living room with a large window like this one. However, on the shoot day he just crept through the living room doors on the right side of the photo below. This was easier to film, but it did mean that waiting for this house to be ready wasn't essential. Nevertheless, it is well-kept and tidy which fits with Tess' character, as I&nbsp;explained in the&nbsp;pre-production package.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the house in Margate, it was ideal to film and eat at the same place. Cooking food for the cast and crew meant that we&nbsp;didn't&nbsp;have to spend more money on the budget, and it was just as good as eating out.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RZ4PAXmgrXo/XHL8VAkgrpI/AAAAAAAADHk/r9qRIOuV3GgELG0HhUERYVL6XuxR-SA8gCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_2562.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RZ4PAXmgrXo/XHL8VAkgrpI/AAAAAAAADHk/r9qRIOuV3GgELG0HhUERYVL6XuxR-SA8gCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_2562.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Creative control</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the previous shoot days, I had a copy of the simplified shot list to tick off each shot. By doing this I was able to make sure we stayed on track with the shot list that Katie had created prior to filming. I did this to make sure the original vision for the film was carried through, and on top of this we managed to capture some more coverage as well. I initially found this out in previous research into the creative role of producer on set, and I believe it has helped me fulfil the requirement of my job role well. We had a successful shoot day for scene 1 which was down to me putting my research into practice.</span><br /><div style="-webkit-text-stroke-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial; font-family: Arial; font-size: 12px; font-stretch: normal; line-height: normal; min-height: 14px;"><span style="font-kerning: none;"></span></div><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-x0vcFY-NBa8/XMLqnVUr1MI/AAAAAAAADnw/prRaYmilUr8tgF2IHamOxJfv5zxuwCI2gCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_6687.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-x0vcFY-NBa8/XMLqnVUr1MI/AAAAAAAADnw/prRaYmilUr8tgF2IHamOxJfv5zxuwCI2gCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_6687.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for scene 1</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; margin-left: 1em; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JZiCJrNkwgA/XMLtHU9jdBI/AAAAAAAADoU/dLtnnTFgwEgZaKYIxg7ejOz3mNH2sAcngCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-26%2Bat%2B12.35.36.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="846" data-original-width="440" height="640" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JZiCJrNkwgA/XMLtHU9jdBI/AAAAAAAADoU/dLtnnTFgwEgZaKYIxg7ejOz3mNH2sAcngCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-26%2Bat%2B12.35.36.png" width="331" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Production schedule for shoot day 5</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In terms of checking we were on&nbsp;schedule, we only had the one scene to shoot. This was the first day throughout production that we only had just the one scene. This made it easier to control and keep track of,&nbsp;because instead of making sure we shot all the scenes scheduled for the day, I just had to make sure we wrapped on time at 16:00. This seemed achievable with just the one scene, however, we may have taken our time&nbsp;knowing we only had the one scene and then overrun. As a result of this, monitoring the day and time was still necessary, even if checking the&nbsp;specific scenes wasn't.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; text-align: center;">What went well</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- This was the shoot where we needed to break the vase. As detailed in the risk assessment we broke one vase separately and safely for individual pieces of china to be placed on the floor. This went well and we managed to get big fragments of china which will be easier to see on the camera, rather than small parts. This was also safer as bigger fragments were seen easier by the cast and crew when we shot the broken china.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- To shoot the actual vase falling off the table, we softened the blow by placing cushions underneath it. This way Tim was actually able to knock the vase off the table like it was explained in the script, rather than try to capture loads of shots from different angles to make it look like it was knocked off.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We only had the one scene to shoot so it would have been difficult to not be on schedule, however, we started and finished on time, so in that sense we were on schedule throughout the day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- At the beginning of the scene, Tim is in the dark while going through Tess' living room drawers, before she enters the room and puts the light on. At one point during another take, we accidentally left the light on when we were starting the scene from the beginning. Alix pointed this out and if it wasn't for her we might not have realised until Tess came in and tried to switch the light on, and then we would have wasted a take and time. Another point Alix picked up on was the way the flowers were positions in the vase each time we picked the vase up from the floor and repeated the take. Again, if she wasn't there we may not have noticed this until the edit, compromising the quality of the scene.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What&nbsp;didn't go so well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We hadn't practised breaking the vase prior to this shoot day, or how we were going to shoot it. This means that we spent a little bit of time deciding how to knock the vase off, where it's going to land and softening the blow. If I had considered this beforehand, we could have practised different methods in which to safely knock the vase off, saving time on the shoot day.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Prior to the shoot day, I only printed out one diploma. When we were in the middle of doing all the takes and getting our coverage, I realised how creased the diploma was getting from the amount of times Tim was taking it out of the printer, and then Tess was snatching it from him. I hadn't considered the amount of takes we were obviously going to do at the time of printing the diploma out. Reflecting on the day has made me realise that I should have printed more than one, and then we could have rehearsed with one and then got a new one for the real takes, and Harriet could have then changed over to a new diploma every now and then.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- In order to soften the blow of the vase falling off the table, we put cushions down on the floor for the vase to land on. This worked really well, however after this we realised that the cushions were in the previous shots and we had just moved them out of place for the vase. To work around this, we had to look back at the takes to see which order the cushions were originally placed. Although this was solved in the end, it was a hinderance and took some more time away from us to film.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What did I learn</b></span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I have learnt to consider the amount of takes we will be capturing in case I need more than one item. I will now need to&nbsp;play around with this in the edit to show the diploma less often to make the creases less&nbsp;visible. An idea that&nbsp;comes to mind is cutting down the shot of Tim&nbsp;retrieving the diploma from the printer so we only see him snatch it out, rather than watch the creased diploma sat in the printer. The quicker I can make the scene the better, and in&nbsp;addition to&nbsp;this, both Tim and Tess are being quite rough with the paper anyway, as Tim snatches it from the printer and Tess snatches it from Tim's hands. As a&nbsp;result of this, you would expect to see a couple of creases on it. It would be a bigger problem if they were being&nbsp;extremely careful with the paper, and&nbsp;then when the audience saw it is was really creased. I will play around with this in the edit.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- As mentioned previously, Alix brought up a couple of ideas which improved the continuity of the scene. Apart from the obvious reason that crew are there to help create a film, I learnt that they are also a good way of bringing ideas into the production. Apart from Katie, Alex and myself, the other members of crew were new to our project and they brought a fresh mind into the production. We were concentrating on getting the shots filmed and if we didn't have Alix there we may not have noticed the light switch or positioning of the flowers.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">SHOOT DAY 6 - Road &amp; drive</span></b><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">SCENE 2</span></b><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 2 consists of Tim meeting Luke and the van for the first time. This was a relatively easy shoot, being just the one scene we needed to film that day. However as we were on the road, I followed my risk assessment carefully and we had a runner watching for traffic.</span><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Cast&nbsp;</span></b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim Stewart - <i>Ed Allenby</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Luke Lucas - <i>Daniel Hemsley</i></span><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Crew</span></b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Producer - Melissa&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director - Alex</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">DoP - Katie</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Runner - Aidan Robinson-Jones</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sound assistant - Alix Mottershead</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On-set dresser - Harriet Gadd</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Photographer - Gina Riley</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Props&nbsp;</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Vet Van &amp; keys</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Fake drugs for glove compartment (paracetamol, oregano)</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The van is a very important part of the production period as it is featured in the majority of the scenes. Alex will be driving it to the shoot day so there is no risk of not having it with us. In the script, Tim finds drugs in the glove compartment which leads onto an ongoing joke about Luke's uncle, Pete. To create these, we brought paracetamol and used washing powder for the white substance, and used oregano for the fake green substances. I previously researched into different herbs to see which one would give the most believable look, and oregano was the one that matched the most.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Costume</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we are filming the second scene, we are still at the beginning of the story of VET-MAN. Therefore, the costume is the same as shoot day 5. Scrubs and hoodie for Tim, and grey hoodie, green top and jeans for Luke.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-NVBJug_Hp24/XHL8wHV1OEI/AAAAAAAADH0/yblBlurAtqQZW4vjZLR3GoMaTHqphcEmwCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0712.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-NVBJug_Hp24/XHL8wHV1OEI/AAAAAAAADH0/yblBlurAtqQZW4vjZLR3GoMaTHqphcEmwCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_0712.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Location</b></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The location that I picked in the pre-production package was ideal, purely&nbsp;because of the open drive that we could park the car on. We also had full access to the drive for the day up until the actual shoot day. The&nbsp;owners informed us of a&nbsp;maintenance man arriving at some point to fix their back gate. This was located behind the van parked on the drive.&nbsp;Initially, this seemed like an&nbsp;inconvenience,&nbsp;however, we soon realised that the owners and the&nbsp;maintenance man would be quite flexible and they were still happy with us to use the drive. When the&nbsp;maintenance main arrived, we were almost finished with the take we were currently shooting, and he was happy to wait for us to finish.&nbsp;Unfortunately, he needed the drive to get closer to the broken gate. This&nbsp;was a good&nbsp;opportunity for us to have our lunch break and then when we returned we hoped he was finished.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">He wasn't finished when we returned, however, fortunately we had finished shooting the shots that were set outside the van and we only had the inside shots left to do. This required a similar background behind the characters, due to this we&nbsp;received permission to park the van on another drive which had a similar surrounding to the first drive.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The runner stood on the&nbsp;opposite side of the road, as shown in my risk assessment, giving&nbsp;himself the best view of the whole road. Similarly to the previous shoot&nbsp;days, he informed us when a&nbsp;vehicle was&nbsp;moving down the road, and we paused filming. We&nbsp;reconvened when the vehicle had stopped or left the road.</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QgvrTDNQF1g/XHL8wn2O45I/AAAAAAAADH4/20mgDXwJF4otxiUy57Ne84N5thtjbv_vACLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_6473.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QgvrTDNQF1g/XHL8wn2O45I/AAAAAAAADH4/20mgDXwJF4otxiUy57Ne84N5thtjbv_vACLcBGAs/s640/IMG_6473.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Creative control</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once again, I prepared myself with a copy of the shot list to ensure we captured all the shots we needed, along with a copy of the production schedule to make sure we didn't overrun. I made sure that the original vision for the project was properly realised, and that we had a smooth production throughout the day, as suggested by Levinson in my previous research. I was successful within my role of checking off shots as we had a successful shoot day with more than enough coverage for me to work with in the edit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Throughout all shoot days including this one, I have essentially taken on the "role of ringleader, seeing to it that all the elements come together as planned (Martin, 2013). As we managed to capture all shots needed throughout the filming period, I believe I have followed this research through in my creative producing on each day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-q5FxdGV0QX8/XMLr16mT7bI/AAAAAAAADoE/vm5bRQ07zIkzz7Ii4GUzt_fEw790i1h_gCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_2969.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="972" data-original-width="1600" height="388" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-q5FxdGV0QX8/XMLr16mT7bI/AAAAAAAADoE/vm5bRQ07zIkzz7Ii4GUzt_fEw790i1h_gCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_2969.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for scene 2</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; margin-left: 1em; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-o8DY65PRQjs/XMSPGMGQwxI/AAAAAAAADpc/mP-YcqOb0LYPwG5zsngQXcMhkBGtMyq7gCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-27%2Bat%2B18.18.58.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1050" data-original-width="554" height="640" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-o8DY65PRQjs/XMSPGMGQwxI/AAAAAAAADpc/mP-YcqOb0LYPwG5zsngQXcMhkBGtMyq7gCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-27%2Bat%2B18.18.58.png" width="336" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Production schedule for shoot day 6</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to shoot day 5, we only had the one scene to shoot on this day - scene 2. Again, it was relatively easy to stay on schedule with only shooting the one scene. If we finished earlier than 16:00 (which was likely as scene 2 is quite short) we wanted to return to the house we met at to take photos for the poster. However, if we were running later or even on time I would have needed to re-schedule a day solely for the photos as I wouldn't want to make the cast stay later than they expected.</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This has its advantages and disadvantages. Advantages would include having a whole day scheduled for poster photos so we could take our time and get the exact photos we wanted.&nbsp;However, disadvantages would include having to spend more money on the budget getting the cast back to the Maidstone area.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Fortunately, on the shoot day we finished earlier than scheduled and had&nbsp;enough time to take the photos for the poster. We wrapped early enough to take our time with the photos which was unexpected and idea. I think this was caused by going for a lunch break&nbsp;earlier due to the&nbsp;maintenance man arriving, and when we returned we&nbsp;only had the inside van shots to get.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What went well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- &nbsp;We finished this shoot day earlier than scheduled, after this we returned to the house we met at and took some photos for the poster. As explained previously, this was an ideal time to do this as we had the two main characters who we wanted on the poster and because we finished filming early we also didn't overrun on the schedule.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The shoot went well in general, the weather stayed bright and sunny for us as I&nbsp;predicted in blog post&nbsp;<i>Preparation&nbsp;for Shoot Week (18th-22nd)</i>.&nbsp;Although we had a few members of public around while filming, they&nbsp;didn't&nbsp;interrupt us which I was thankful for as would have added to the&nbsp;reason as to why we finished earlier than scheduled and were able to take the poster photos.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- All in all, the shoot was&nbsp;relatively&nbsp;quick and simple&nbsp;which was a good way to wrap up filming for VET-MAN.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I believe I kept to the risk assessment well and kept crew and cast safe at all times.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What&nbsp;didn't go so well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- When we changed the positioning of the van to the second drive, we had a few lighting issues as we were in a different path of the sun. Nevertheless, we reviewed the footage from the first drive and found that the sunlight didn't look too different which meant it was an ideal location to finish our filming.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- As we were filming outside we had the odd car drive past us, however this is inevitable when filming in a public place.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What did I learn</b></span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Although we weren't informed about the maintenance man until the day, the owners would have known about the gate being fixed a couple of days before the shoot day at least. As a result of this, I have learnt that it may be worth contacting the locations the day before we are due to film to cover for scenarios like this one. The only locations I had to contact for this project was The Kent Owl Academy, The Bell Inn and the homeowners to this drive. The other locations came from myself and Katie, or were public spaces. I had contacted all three locations prior to filming, however, this wasn't the day before, only a couple of days before. This has taught me that next time it may be beneficial to contact the locations the day before.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">If I had done this, ideally the homeowners would have known about the gate and could have warned me. Subsequently, I then could have tweaked the filming day slightly so we started filming earlier or later to work around the time in which the maintenance man was due. I will keep this in mind for any time in the future when I may have to contact locations.</span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-81047098841957984972019-02-21T23:10:00.000+00:002019-05-09T22:59:17.692+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: BTS Photos for Shoot Day's 3 & 4<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we had our photographer on&nbsp;board on these shoot days, she got a selection of behind the scenes photos for us.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>A selection of behind the scenes:</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-784AA-U3gzs/XIWaqfiQQyI/AAAAAAAADOY/Vu6-OHXXv1QlhH-904Ui3on3_QRVc__9ACLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0407.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-784AA-U3gzs/XIWaqfiQQyI/AAAAAAAADOY/Vu6-OHXXv1QlhH-904Ui3on3_QRVc__9ACLcBGAs/s640/IMG_0407.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Ff0NIQPyEcA/XIWayQQW5VI/AAAAAAAADOc/74993j2ab2E1PKcOM1LCOA6Jlu8O5L7FQCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0420.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Ff0NIQPyEcA/XIWayQQW5VI/AAAAAAAADOc/74993j2ab2E1PKcOM1LCOA6Jlu8O5L7FQCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_0420.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-pQap0wfSkzA/XIWbAITfq0I/AAAAAAAADOo/cfDiT7dVNfkPWynZTkBRZMhFZesEftVlwCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0462.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-pQap0wfSkzA/XIWbAITfq0I/AAAAAAAADOo/cfDiT7dVNfkPWynZTkBRZMhFZesEftVlwCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_0462.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-4FS5XU3fIdo/XIWbASKQy4I/AAAAAAAADOs/JsbHXLktlCoUvsjhAZKpjVexpjdlA99gQCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0465.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-4FS5XU3fIdo/XIWbASKQy4I/AAAAAAAADOs/JsbHXLktlCoUvsjhAZKpjVexpjdlA99gQCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_0465.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><br />Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-39746802704085404032019-02-20T20:57:00.001+00:002019-05-09T22:59:08.996+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Shoot Day 3 & 4<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>SHOOT DAY 3 - Sheila's house (Scenes in order 5, 4, 3, 6)</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Cast</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim Stewart - <i>Ed Allenby</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Luke Lucas - <i>Daniel Hemsley</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sheila Hodges - <i>Susan Baskerville&nbsp;</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to this shoot being in my home town, I was able to prepare the morning for shooting rather than travelling to a further afield location. Similar to the previous two shoot days, we had a full cast, however a few days prior to the shoot day one of our characters said that she had to leave early due to a short notice appointment. I was grateful that she was willing to come to Margate for a few hours and then leave shortly after, so we agreed to get all her shots done first and then concentrate on the other shots after lunch.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Crew</span></b><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Producer - Melissa&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director - Alex</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">DoP - Katie</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Runner - Aidan Robinson-Jones</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sound assistant - Alix Mottershead</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Make-up artist - Bethany Ashby</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On-set dresser - Harriet Gadd</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Photographer - Gina Riley</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We had a full crew on this shoot day, including our make-up artist. This was the first shoot she had attended for us, but I met up with her previously to practice the red / black eye and blood splatter and so she would have one friendly face with her on the shoot day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>SCENE 5</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props for this scene:&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Bin bag and carpet</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 5 was the first scene we shot on this shoot day. It consisted of Luke arriving at Sheila's house with the dog in the bin bag. This was shot in the house in Margate.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The house I picked for&nbsp;Sheila's house was ideal and worked really well. The drive in&nbsp;front of the house was empty which gave us plenty of room for the crew to be based. The road was also quite as we only had a handful of cars drive past while we were&nbsp;filming.&nbsp;Having access to the house was also beneficial&nbsp;because Ed wasn't needed for&nbsp;this scene so he was&nbsp;able to make himself comfortable until we&nbsp;needed him. Teas and coffees and drinks in general were also easy to make for the cast and crew. When it came&nbsp;to lunch time, again&nbsp;being in a house was very helpful. Everyone sat round the table and I gave them two choices of food - beef&nbsp;lasagne or jacket potato. This was a good warmth break as well,&nbsp;because although it was sunny, it was quite a cold day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/--QbIIyX10ZQ/XMmJRaNwVEI/AAAAAAAADtw/el_zlfJai_UfFNjRRvcSF2tjwaHBZf64wCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B12.55.01.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="936" data-original-width="1506" height="396" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/--QbIIyX10ZQ/XMmJRaNwVEI/AAAAAAAADtw/el_zlfJai_UfFNjRRvcSF2tjwaHBZf64wCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B12.55.01.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 5</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As shown in my risk assessment diagram in the previous blog post, all crew are on the empty drive throughout the duration of&nbsp;scene 5. There is the one&nbsp;establishing&nbsp;shot where Katie is across the other side of the road, however she is wearing a high-vis jacket and is&nbsp;stood with a runner&nbsp;watching the traffic. Once she gets the establishing shot, the rest of the scene is shot from the drive and&nbsp;inside the house. We had enough crew on the day, allowing me to concentrate purely on producing and checking off the shot list as we went through the different shots.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This scene was straightforward and didn't take&nbsp;long to capture.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>SCENE 4</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props for this scene:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Doctors bag</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Fake blood</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Vet Van</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Screwdrivers</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Stethoscope</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Gloves</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Syringe and scalpel</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 4 was next on the production schedule and this was a more complex scene including the surgery scene and blood splatter.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The main prop for this&nbsp;scene was the blood as it's such a big part of the film. Alex&nbsp;brought his fake&nbsp;blood that we used for the Transitions unit,&nbsp;however, this had gone off slightly and wasn't the colour red&nbsp;anymore. I did check with Alex, prior to the shoot day, that he definitely had the blood prepared in case I had to buy another one,&nbsp;however, Alex hadn't noticed the colour change so we had to use Beth's fake blood which she was fine with. As this was our problem and not hers, I reimbursed her the price of the blood so she could buy another bottle for her own work.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OrM-nMJ0VEk/XMmOWirEIZI/AAAAAAAADt8/uvc4TW7otD0msctxC6JgnVaF_Cr4zaIUwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B13.16.46.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="718" data-original-width="1526" height="300" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OrM-nMJ0VEk/XMmOWirEIZI/AAAAAAAADt8/uvc4TW7otD0msctxC6JgnVaF_Cr4zaIUwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B13.16.46.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 4</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We ended up having two fake cats to decide from as the first one which was the most ideal, was late being&nbsp;delivered and it ended up arriving the date before the shoot day. I&nbsp;didn't want a&nbsp;repeat of the&nbsp;doctors bag so I ordered another one which had next day delivery&nbsp;available&nbsp;on it. Fortunately, fake cats are more common than second hand&nbsp;briefcases so I was able to find another one online. As I&nbsp;discussed in</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Shoot Day 1 &amp; 2&nbsp;</i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">blog post, this was not possible for the doctors bag, as there weren't any others suitable enough. Due to this, I had to hold out on the one we had ordered in advance&nbsp;which didn't arrive in the end. The second cat I had ordered had a hard texture to it,&nbsp;whereas, the first one was soft and&nbsp;fluffy. As explained in my research&nbsp;in the pre-production unit, ideally I&nbsp;wanted a fluffy cat for it to look more&nbsp;believable as a real cat as we are planning on zooming in on the cat. If we used the hard textured one, it may have looked like a garden ornament rather than a real fluffy cat. As a result of this, the first cat I had ordered was ideal and the&nbsp;second one was a back up. Fortunately, the first cat arrived&nbsp;just in time, I asked Alex which one he'd prefer, and he also said the fluffy one. This looked more authentic on camera when we zoomed in on the cat after Tim had driven off.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the previous scene, the runner stood on the other side of the road and watched out for traffic. To follow my risk assessment, he informed us of any vehicles entering the cul-de-sac and we paused filming. Once the vehicle had left the road or had&nbsp;pulled over, we continued with filming. Along with checking off shots and checking the production schedule, I looked out for traffic as&nbsp;well. This was&nbsp;beneficial with the side road leading to the church that I described&nbsp;in the risk assessment blog post.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Costume / make-up</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Ed and Dan brought the correct&nbsp;costumes for the shoot day. As each scene (3, 4, 5 &amp; 6) is before the owl academy visit Ed wore the scrubs and hoodie, and dan wore his black jeans, green top and grey hoodie.&nbsp;Due to arranging the&nbsp;majority of the scenes before the owl academy meant that we&nbsp;didn't need any costume changes on this day. Sue was free to wear anything as her costume didn't require anything in particular. I just explained that we would be buying her a long cardigan for the blood hand print so she could wear something that suited a cardigan on top.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Prior to this shoot day, I&nbsp;liaised with Alex about the make-up trial run and in particular, the&nbsp;results of the different spray bottles. I explained how we found the&nbsp;spray lid and the spray bottle and the different results they gave. Alex explained that he wanted a splatter similar to our previous VET-MAN project, as the actor became covered in blood and it was visually quite gory, which fitted with the tone of the film. As a result of this, we agreed to use the water gun as we did in the previous project for the initial splatter once he stabs the dog, and then our make-up&nbsp;artist can cover the face more with the spray afterwards. During the edit, I should be able to make the transition from water gun to spray bottle look realistic.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to a large part of this scene being based on the visual aspect of blood when Tim attempts to operate on the dog, I made sure I had our make-up artist on board for the whole day. The blood is an important part of the film, and we wanted it to look impressive, and our make-up artist was ideal to be in charge of this while we were left to work on our own job roles. She had different types of blood that we could use, a liquid blood or a more solid type of fake blood. For the blood on Tim's gloves he was able to pick out a bit of the solid blood and rub it in his hands, whereas on his face we used the liquid blood. Once we had the initial splatter from the water gun, we had Beth cover his face a bit more with the spray bottle, she also finished off the blood on his gloves with the spray bottle to keep it wet. Our make-up artist was a great asset to the group as we could leave her to be in charge of topping up the blood, which meant that was one less thing I had to worry about.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Beth sat in her car until she was needed, therefore, she didn't wear a high-vis jacket. She constantly worked on the pavement and wasn't needed in the road while filming.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dNLJVLxuqaY/XLt9pF2uxcI/AAAAAAAADho/Nyh6RISQXqYEr_fCep_z4j3VJbSstMPjACLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0421.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="426" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dNLJVLxuqaY/XLt9pF2uxcI/AAAAAAAADho/Nyh6RISQXqYEr_fCep_z4j3VJbSstMPjACLcBGAs/s640/IMG_0421.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Ed and our make-up artist</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The location worked well for us.&nbsp;Relating back to my&nbsp;research into the church timetable, we weren't&nbsp;interrupted too many times, only around the times I had expected due to the activities that were happening on the day. As we filmed on a cul-de-sac I expected cars to enter and turn around at the bottom and leave the road again, however,&nbsp;this&nbsp;wasn't very&nbsp;often which was&nbsp;beneficial for us. I had no emails from the residents down the road so they must have been fine with us filming there, and we had no&nbsp;interrupts along&nbsp;these lines either which led us to&nbsp;have a smooth shoot day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">There was only really one possible disadvantage to where we shot the scenes which was the fact that we were near to a bus stop, so every now and then a bus would drive past and they are louder than the average car. However, this wasn't too distracting as we only had to wait a few minutes and the bus would had driven off again.</span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>SCENE 3</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props for this scene:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Phone for maps</span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 3&nbsp;consisted of the action of actually 'hitting the dog'. We had planned to film this with the van stationary, due to the fact there are no back seats in the van. The idea after this was to put an&nbsp;effect on the clip which changes the light movement across the screen, this will make them look like&nbsp;they're driving along the road.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Although we have worked out the logistics of the dog hit, I brought the bin bag and carpet anyway, in case we decided against the emergency stop manoeuvre that we practiced previously.&nbsp;</span>As we found in the test shoot, the carpet is so soft that the bump&nbsp;won't damage the van, but it was also thick enough to&nbsp;establish the idea of them running over something. The van's weight would bring the carpet down&nbsp;because it's soft, but there was enough carpet there to&nbsp;still make an impact.&nbsp;<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the end, we&nbsp;continued with the&nbsp;idea of Tim braking hard&nbsp;in the van and both characters leaning forward and</span>&nbsp;then falling backwards after the impact of 'hitting the dog'. This added with a yelp from the dog (royalty free sound effects website) should look quite effective in the edit. To film them moving in the van we captured it when the van was stationary and then we will add a moving effect on the shot, which will change the light across their faces as if they are actually moving. This will be added in during the fine cut.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This was a relatively easy scene, similarly to scene 5. We shot the van a few times from the outside with Tim actually driving it. He then performed a few emergency stops to make it look like he had just hit something. When he did these,&nbsp;myself and the runner were stood on the opposite&nbsp;side of the road watching the&nbsp;traffic.&nbsp;Again, if vehicle entered the road the runner would inform us and we would pause filming until the&nbsp;vehicle had left or pulled over. This scene was more dangerous in terms of getting in the way of other cars, as we were&nbsp;driving the van and performing emergency stops, we were in the middle of our&nbsp;side of the road. Whereas, in scene 4 we had the van pulled up on the other side and we were just&nbsp;filming&nbsp;around it. Fortunately this was a short scene and it was completed quickly.&nbsp;</span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">SCENE 6</b><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props for the scene:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Fake cat</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 6 consisted of Luke running back from Sheila's house and telling Tim to drive off quickly. Where we were positioned, Luke had to run across the side road leading to the church car park. As he was concentrating on performing, I stood on the other side of the road so I had full view of the cul-de-sac and Aidan stood on the side road on the corner of where the church is. Standing here, he had a good view of cars coming out of the church car park. Having both of us positioned where we were meant that we had full view of the whole road, and side road minimising the risk of a car driving towards Luke's path.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">When they&nbsp;both got in the van, Tim quickly turned the engine, took the handbrake off and drove off as fast as he could. Again, the runner and I&nbsp;stood on the other side of the road, giving us full view of the front and back of the van. Tim was able to see for himself out of the front of the van anyway, but if a vehicle started moving behind him, we were able to inform Alex and he would cut filming.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Creative control</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the owl academy shoot days, I had a copy of Katie's shot list. Having this meant I was able to cross out the shots we captured keeping on top of the shots we still needed to shoot before the end of the day.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The shot lists below are in the order in which we filmed them. We started with scene 5, then 4, 6 and 3, as I had&nbsp;scheduled in the production schedule. By being responsible for checking that we had the correct shots, I was able to have a creative control over production. Like the previous shoot days, my priority was to make sure the original vision of the film was realised. I was able to do this by revising the shot list and knowing the story of VET-MAN well. Any additional shots or coverage was ideal, but as long as we had the original shots that we planned, which we did by the end of the day, then I knew I had done my job correctly as producer. As I attended the shoot day, I was available to help Alex with any suggestions I may have had. I was also there to inform him whether we had missed shots / scenes. This didn't happen but if I wasn't there then it could have so instead of taking that chance, it was my priority to attend the shoot days and make sure I was on hand for help and checking we had captured everything we needed.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-M2QY-zStKgg/XMLW1jeDTqI/AAAAAAAADnI/K57ytcggH2UupAoICCJPfRIloTF63PPegCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_5116.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-M2QY-zStKgg/XMLW1jeDTqI/AAAAAAAADnI/K57ytcggH2UupAoICCJPfRIloTF63PPegCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_5116.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for scene 3</span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YIEC86uWTDo/XMLVqLc2L3I/AAAAAAAADmw/72ONqa_ZSVAIeiW1sSswaS8DQ45DM4XzQCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0979.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="927" data-original-width="1600" height="370" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YIEC86uWTDo/XMLVqLc2L3I/AAAAAAAADmw/72ONqa_ZSVAIeiW1sSswaS8DQ45DM4XzQCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_0979.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for scene 4</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4FMASJvOtEo/XMLViC0qRsI/AAAAAAAADms/90BQq00haw8mL21h4wQrIVdbf-2FgxZ_gCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_6075.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4FMASJvOtEo/XMLViC0qRsI/AAAAAAAADms/90BQq00haw8mL21h4wQrIVdbf-2FgxZ_gCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_6075.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for scene 5</span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-UNL5863H3Cc/XMLVs9-SY3I/AAAAAAAADm0/VVr2Gzmu5Xclvrznr_pu4f7nOuddr-8ogCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_7757.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1093" data-original-width="1600" height="436" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-UNL5863H3Cc/XMLVs9-SY3I/AAAAAAAADm0/VVr2Gzmu5Xclvrznr_pu4f7nOuddr-8ogCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_7757.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for scene 6</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; margin-left: 1em; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-WeGsbFo8Svc/XMLp_qAV3VI/AAAAAAAADng/06bGYCSeiPIJBJKR4izMUB90SLuNTS0RQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-26%2Bat%2B12.20.50.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1056" data-original-width="554" height="640" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-WeGsbFo8Svc/XMLp_qAV3VI/AAAAAAAADng/06bGYCSeiPIJBJKR4izMUB90SLuNTS0RQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-26%2Bat%2B12.20.50.png" width="334" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Production schedule for shoot day 3</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As part of my creative role of producing, I had to ensure we had everything we needed by the end of the day. To check we were on schedule and to make sure we got all the scenes completed each day, I also took a copy of the production schedule. Again, I was able to cross of the scenes as we went through the shoot days so I could keep track of how we were doing compared with the production schedule.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On shoot day 3, we started with scene 5 at&nbsp;Sheila's house as we met everyone here at the beginning of the day.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This was quite a simple scene, where Luke walks up to Sheila's front door and knocks. Sheila answers the door and Luke breaks the news about the dog, Sheila then starts crying in Luke's arms and&nbsp;explains how Sooty was "such a good&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">cat&nbsp;</i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">". Due to this being a short scene, I had only&nbsp;scheduled the hour for this, and true to time we completed it in the hour. We quickly travelled round the corner to St. Mary's Avenue to continue with the other scenes.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 4 was the most complex scene of the day as this included the surgery scene on the dog. As a result of this, it required the longest amount of time spent on it. To fit in all four scenes I had to schedule 1 hour for scenes 5, 6 and 3 and as I said previously, scene 4 got the longest time for the most complex scene at 2 hours. I could have scheduled even less time for the shorter scenes at 30 - 45 minutes, however, I felt that an hour was a good amount of time to capture the scene and any extra shots / coverage that we need.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 3 was when the van actually hit the dog. As we had worked out how to shoot the dog hit previously (blog post <i>Working out the Logistics</i>), we knew how we wanted the scene shot, as a result of this it shouldn't have taken too long, which is why I only scheduled the hour for this section. Fortunately, I was correct and it didn't take long at all.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">What went well</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I knew looking at the church timetable would prove beneficial, however, I didn't realise how helpful it actually was until the shoot day. We were expecting public to be around on the times I stated from the timetable, so these were expected interruptions. Although, we expected the public around at these times, most of the time they weren't actually interrupting us. Some members of the public noticed we were filming and were quiet, and others would walk past talking but only for a few minutes and then we were able to continue. Dealing with members of the public is something that is inevitable whenever we film in a shared area because people are interested in what we are doing. In terms of how busy and loud it could have been, I believe we were very lucky in the sense of not being interrupted many times.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I believe&nbsp;minimising the risks / following the risk assessment went well. I constantly had my mind on the road and making sure Aidan was in the correct&nbsp;places to give him the best view of the road. I always waited for&nbsp;him to say it was clear before telling Alex to go ahead with&nbsp;filming, and if a&nbsp;vehicle&nbsp;entered the road we paused until it had left or stopped.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What&nbsp;didn't go so well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The blood splatter was one of the most vital parts of scene. However, due to the out-of-date blood, we only had a small amount from the make-up artist as that was all she had with her. This meant that there wasn't a lot of blood in the spray bottle, which subsequently meant that that initial splatter wasn't great. Nevertheless, we got a spray of blood on camera &nbsp;which went onto Tim's face. The blood that Beth put on Tim's hands looked good, and it left a successful hand print on both Sheila and Luke.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Unfortunately, we only had Sue for the morning due to a change in plans a couple of days before the shoot day. I was reluctant to rearrange the shoot day as all the cast and crew were available. As a result of this, Sue came for the morning and we shot both her scenes first. Due to this, we felt rushed on the shoot day. I was keeping an eye on the time so she could get back for a last minute appointment, and I think all the crew were trying to get through the scene so we could let Sue go. We managed to get Sue's takes complete on the day which was the main thing, but we could only get one take of each angle for her. For example, one close up, one mid shot etc. As we got the basic shots, I am confident that the sequence will look good in the edit, however, we might find that we lack slightly in coverage because we simply didn't have a good amount of time with her that morning. There is always the opportunity to re-shoot which is why I scheduled the main shoot week for the middle of February. We'll have time to review the footage in the edit, and we'll have time for a re-shoot if we feel that it's necessary.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What did I learn</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Sue having to leave early was only known a couple days before the shoot day so unfortunately, on my part I believe that this is not a case of learning to rearrange sooner as I physically didn't have the time to arrange another date. The other members of cast and crew were all set to come to Margate, some crew members had booked it off work and wouldn't have been able to book more time off so soon for a re-scheduled shoot day. On the other hand, this experience was a learning curve as&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I found out how quickly a change can have a knock-on effect to other aspects of production. For example,</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;if the crew&nbsp;weren't free due to their own work commitments then we may have had to film</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;quite a while later, which would mean booking out equipment again when everyone else is doing their filming.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>SHOOT DAY 4 - Inside and&nbsp;outside The Bell Inn (scenes 12 &amp;13)</b></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Cast</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim Stewart -&nbsp;<i>Ed Allenby</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Luke Lucas -&nbsp;<i>Daniel Hemsley</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tess Connolly -&nbsp;<i>Skevy Stylia&nbsp;</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sheila Hodges -&nbsp;<i>Susan Baskerville</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Mark Hodges -&nbsp;<i>Alan Sawyer</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Extras:</span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , sans-serif;">Anthony James<o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , sans-serif;">Yvonne James<o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , sans-serif;">Alice James<o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , sans-serif;">Jim Hargood<o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , sans-serif;">Sam Hargood</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Today's shoot day consisted of the largest group of cast, and therefore, my biggest challenge so far. As the producer, I am responsible for the cast, crew and contributors and their comfort on set. Throughout the shoot week I have been checking on each cast member, and checking each crew member is happy in their role. We also had extras on this location to occupy the pub setting. Again, I ensured each extra was happy with their role in the scene. The extras were made up of Alex's family so they were happy to be there to watch us in action. I set up a tab for the bar so people could get teas and coffees while they waited and during filming. I understand that this would be an added cost, but I wanted to make sure I kept my cast and extras happy for the duration of filming. We have also under spent so far on the lunches in the restaurants so I am hoping I have overestimated the price for todays food as well, meaning that extra money can go on the teas and coffees.</span><br /><b style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><b style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Crew</span></b><br /><div style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b></div><div style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Producer - Melissa&nbsp;</span></div><div style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Director - Alex</span></div><div style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">DoP - Katie</span></div><div style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Lighting assistant / runner - Katthaliya Cahalane&nbsp;</span></div><div style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sound assistant - Alix Mottershead</span></div><div style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Make-up artist - Bethany Ashby</span></div><div style="font-family: calibri, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On-set dresser - Harriet Gadd</span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Photographer - Gina Riley</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once Katie, and Alex and myself arrived, we started setting up. I was responsible for picking up Ed and Dan from the train station while Katie and Alex continued setting up. While I picked them up I also stopped into the studios to pick up our lighting equipment. By the time I had returned&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">our extras and Skevy, Sue and Al had arrived and we were ready to start.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The first thing to be completed was the black eye make-up on Ed. While we were finishing up the last of the set-up, I asked Beth to do the black eye that we did during the trial run. I had previously liaised with Alex about the black and red eye that we practised the other day. He was&nbsp;very happy with the make-up so I knew to&nbsp;tell Beth to create&nbsp;the same&nbsp;black eye as she did before.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Alix was on hand again as sound assistant and Katthaliya was our lighting assistant / runner. This location was the only one where we required&nbsp;artificial lighting as we proved in a test shoot during the pre-production unit. Due to this, we have only needed runners on the previous shoot days. However, today was different with the need for lights. I stepped in to be a runner if Alex or Katie needed&nbsp;anything, while Katthaliya was responsible for the lighting.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Costume</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As this pub scene was set at the end of the film, this happens after the&nbsp;visit to the owl academy which therefore, meant that Ed and Dan wore their second costumes - the blue&nbsp;hoodie, blue top and dark green&nbsp;trousers for Tim's character, and red hoodie, white top and light blue&nbsp;jeans for Luke's character. Skevy wore her smart clothing to give off her successful estate agent job, she wore a coat on top to keep her warm, and again, Sue and Al were free to wear whatever they wanted. We recommended Sue to wear&nbsp;something different to the previous shoot day in Margate to help represent a new day in the story. Alex wanted Al to be intimidating for Tim. As a result of this, we asked him to wear a leather jacket. Sometimes we can associate leather jackets with bikers, who can seem intimidating when in large groups. We thought this would be the easiest way to help show the reason for the intimidation. Similarly to Sue, the extras were also able to wear whatever they liked as they only need to wear everyday clothes.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>SCENE 12</b></span><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props for this scene:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Pint glasses &amp; drink</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Black eye make-up</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In order to save some of the budget, I thought ahead and brought two non-alcoholic drinks - a can of beer&nbsp;and a bottle of fruity cider - as&nbsp;their drinks were described in the script. I knew the land-lord would be around on the shoot day, however, I&nbsp;didn't want to bug him about using his drinks and we would have had to pay for them. Due to the amount of takes that were required&nbsp;according to the shot list, I knew that we would need to fill up the glasses a number of different times. In addition to this, in the script it explains that Tim only has a&nbsp;<i>small</i>&nbsp;amount of beer in his glass which he gulps at the end, and Luke only has a couple of sips of his cider.&nbsp;As a result of these, I felt that it would be cheaper to buy a can of beer and a bottle of fruity cider and get Harriet to be on hand to fill up the glasses to the required height in order to keep the continuity.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">When I first started talking to our&nbsp;make-up artist I asked what make-up to buy for the black eyes, but she&nbsp;insisted that we could use hers. As we had&nbsp;permission to&nbsp;use Beth's&nbsp;make-up I wasn't&nbsp;expected to reimburse the&nbsp;cost of it like I did on the shoot day in Margate.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-AOIE2FtCzxg/XG2JJSijNTI/AAAAAAAADGY/dj-WHzC2MzQwwsYo2ZgaM3QsBrPzD0lMgCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_9458.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-AOIE2FtCzxg/XG2JJSijNTI/AAAAAAAADGY/dj-WHzC2MzQwwsYo2ZgaM3QsBrPzD0lMgCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_9458.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The pub was a perfect setting for the end of our film. Fortunately, we were able to film before the pub opened so we had free rein of the area. This was ideal because along with all our cast, crew and extras we also had many equipment bags and peoples personal bags which were placed on tables around the pub. I don't think we would have had a successful shoot day if we had filmed when the pub was open to the public, so we were very fortunate for the opportunity from the landlord. Although I brought a couple of glasses and a couple of drinks, I didn't think of everyone - I only brought enough for Tim and Luke's takes, forgetting that Sheila and Mark would be sat on the opposite side. As a result of this, we had to ask the landlord for a couple of glasses with a tipple in them. Fortunately, the landlord was completely fine with this. Although we had extras in to make it sound busier than what it was, they were quite quiet. This was ideal though as we had no problems with recording the dialogue from the characters, and we will be able to put pub atmos in the background during the edit. It was understandable that the extras weren't very talkative because they wouldn't want to talk too loud around our sound assistant anyway. They looked effective in the background to join with the pub atmos that will be imported into the edit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>SCENE 13</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Props for this scene:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Bloody tissues</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Doctors bag</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Van</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fpsTgsI6PYI/XG2J-fOBioI/AAAAAAAADG4/T7zoZfwEsE4_kYHzVq9ysp2JxhnfJ_h4gCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-20%2Bat%2B17.09.30.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="617" data-original-width="1600" height="246" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fpsTgsI6PYI/XG2J-fOBioI/AAAAAAAADG4/T7zoZfwEsE4_kYHzVq9ysp2JxhnfJ_h4gCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-20%2Bat%2B17.09.30.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span> <br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The car park was also ideal to film in. As we filmed in the morning / middle&nbsp;of the day, it was quiet. This was one of the&nbsp;benefits from filming at this time of day that I discussed when picking the location and&nbsp;scheduling the filming times during the pre-production unit. Fortunately for us, I was correct in&nbsp;thinking that filming&nbsp;during this time of day would be quiet which led to a smooth shoot day. We had the odd car driving in and out of the car park, but compared to what the car park could be like in the&nbsp;evening, a car every now and then was fine&nbsp;with us.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">When we were filming outside the pub in their car park, the LEDs were not needed so I set&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Katthaliya to watch for any cars entering and leaving the car park. She would then let us know and we would pause filming until the car had left or was stationary. When it came to filming the final shot with the van driving through the car park and to the exit, Katthaliya and I went further down the car park by the gate that leads to the pub informing anyone exiting that we were filming a moving van through the cars. This worked well as we did come across a couple of people walking through the gate.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The make-up that Beth and I practiced prior to the shoot day looked good in the day light, however I won't be able to see it on the camera properly until it comes to the edit. I had faith in Katie to tell me whether the make-up looked realistic or not on the camera, but she didn't mention it so I believe that it looked believable on screen. When Beth had completed the make-up I checked with Alex if it looked believable and he was happy with it, so we kept this for the scene. Again, Beth was on hand to top up the blood coming from Tim's nose. This left Katie, Alex and myself free to concentrate on our own jobs.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-7aEboeRRn_Q/XG2JcZErmyI/AAAAAAAADG0/w-SyKVJ92JUnJSuDuertiRggOjuGubGGQCEwYBhgL/s1600/IMG_4150.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-7aEboeRRn_Q/XG2JcZErmyI/AAAAAAAADG0/w-SyKVJ92JUnJSuDuertiRggOjuGubGGQCEwYBhgL/s640/IMG_4150.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Creative control</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">S</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">imilarly to the previous shoot days, I had a copy of the shot list which I crossed off&nbsp;when we completed each shot. I did this to make sure we had captured the original vision for the film. Additional shots were ideal but as long as we had all the shots that we had planned, which we did, I knew I did my job correctly. I was also at the shoot day for support for Alex, if he had any problems or needed any advice then I was available to help. Fortunately, we had a successful shoot with no problems, we felt slightly rushed leaving the pub inside as the public were arriving for lunch, but I ensured we had every shot listed and on top of this we did capture some additional shots and coverage which I will be grateful for when it comes to the edit. Once outside and in the car park, we captured all the shots again that were listed so altogether we had a successful shoot day.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b></b></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Oo5JSKGKQ-c/XMRaSlP3xhI/AAAAAAAADpE/2-udOLymTXQYRz_qdSwDW1hrQ81nOsXgwCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_3672.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Oo5JSKGKQ-c/XMRaSlP3xhI/AAAAAAAADpE/2-udOLymTXQYRz_qdSwDW1hrQ81nOsXgwCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_3672.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for scene 12</span></td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CuStnQFcV10/XMLpNEb1liI/AAAAAAAADnY/gqWwoDhf8Mw5FtTbkm8ygKImLCE8iei1gCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_7060.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CuStnQFcV10/XMLpNEb1liI/AAAAAAAADnY/gqWwoDhf8Mw5FtTbkm8ygKImLCE8iei1gCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_7060.JPG" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Shot list for scene 13</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: right; margin-left: 1em; text-align: right;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-K9LRoGiJp8M/XMLqGmrwKnI/AAAAAAAADnk/NvClmxWg7ckHIcUjsD5wXm79_7SwF_jcgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-26%2Bat%2B12.22.10.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1058" data-original-width="676" height="640" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-K9LRoGiJp8M/XMLqGmrwKnI/AAAAAAAADnk/NvClmxWg7ckHIcUjsD5wXm79_7SwF_jcgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-26%2Bat%2B12.22.10.png" width="408" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Production schedule for shoot day 4</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I scheduled for everyone to meet at the normal time of 08:00 for crew, and 09:00 for cast. Fortunately, the landlord said we could come into the pub from 09:00 which was beneficial so we&nbsp;didn't waste any time waiting to go in. Everyone was also&nbsp;on time which allowed us to start the filming as scheduled at 10:00.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The shoot inside the pub took slightly longer than the outside shoot, as I imagined. We had more cast members involved in scene 12 so it look longer to talk to each person, explain the scene and what Alex wants from it. We finished the inside shoot not long after the pub opened for the public, which means we were ahead of schedule slightly. We invited everyone for lunch at the pub, before prepping the car park for scene 13. Due to finishing earlier in the inside shoot, we ate earlier, however, as we were on time we took longer for lunch and started filming scene 13 at 13:00.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the previous shoot days, I was able to cross off the scenes as we went along, ensuring everything scheduled was captured and recorded. The shoot day would&nbsp;have been a waste if we did the whole day&nbsp;and forgot one or two shots or takes that we had written down so it was very&nbsp;beneficial for me to cross them off as we went along. I helped ensure a successful shoot day, which ultimately went well under control of the director.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What went well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We managed to get all the coverage we needed in a shortish period of time inside the pub. Towards the end we could tell that the landlord wanted us to finished filming for his punters. Fortunately, we got all the shots that were listed.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- As I said previously, we were fortunate enough to film before the pub opened, as we wouldn't have been so successful if we couldn't film until the pub had the public inside. Due to this, I am very thankful towards the landlord for allowing us to film early.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- We started ahead of schedule after finishing scene 12 before 13:00, however, we still ended up finishing on time at 16:00. This was beneficial for the cast and crew to leave when I said they would. The extras were free to leave after lunch so they were out earlier than expected as well.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Similarly to the previous shoot day, I believe that I dealt with the health and safety aspect of production well. When we&nbsp;were&nbsp;in the car park, I made sure Katthaliya knew to inform us when a car entered the car park so we could pause filming. We would wait until the vehicle stopped or left the car park before carrying on. All&nbsp;equipment and personal bags were kept in the crew cars during filming so it&nbsp;wasn't in the way of traffic. We also followed the van and stood at the other side of&nbsp;the car park&nbsp;informing customers leaving the pub to get into&nbsp;their cars.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>What&nbsp;didn't go so well</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- The sun kept going in and out of clouds therefore we struggled with the continuity of the shots. To work around this, we tried to shoot scene 13 once when the clouds were out and covering the sun, and we tried to shoot it again when the sun was shining in front of the clouds. This seemed like a good idea at the time, but I was crossing off the shots only the once, and not twice. Reflecting on the day now, I should have made a note on the list of what shots we had captured with and without the sun so we knew which ones we still needed. As I am taking on the rough cut, I will try my best to work round the sun and light differences in the shots. Like I said about shoot day 3, I purposefully scheduled the shoot week early (3 months before the deadline) to give time for re-shoots if they're needed. My next task surrounding this will be to start the edit with a fresh mind next week, and see what I can do about the light changes in the scene.</span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">What did I learn</b><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- To be more patient when filming. We knew we had the problem with the sun shining through the clouds but we had nearly competed the scene when we realised the change in light. As a result of this, I feel that we rushed the second group of shots trying to get two full sequences. The quality of the film is more important than getting the shots completed quickly, so I have learnt from this.&nbsp;</span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-46116885529037212052019-02-17T15:02:00.000+00:002019-05-09T22:58:45.406+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Testing Make-Up & Fake Blood<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We aim to create a splatter of fake blood during VET-MAN, similarly to our Transitions unit. This happens once our characters, Tim and Luke, have run over a dog in the Vet Van. Tim is trying to save the dog and he hears Sheila's voice, this causes him to slip with a scalpel and butcher the dog instead. We&nbsp;attempted the blood splatter with different methods during our previous project, however, this was quite difficult and the end result which was used in the final video&nbsp;wasn't the best it could&nbsp;have been. By&nbsp;using the fake blood in the same way for this project gives me the opportunity to test more methods in which we could create the splatter. I felt as if the previous blood&nbsp;splatter could have been done better and more realistic, which is what led me to want to conduct further tests.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During this project, I managed to get an experienced make-up artist to join us on the shoot days which include the blood and black eye make-up. Getting Beth on board meant that I was able to ask her opinion on how we could conduct the blood splatter in the most realistic way. Due to her experience in blood make-up and prosthetics, I felt confident in going with what she suggested and I believe that she will give us a realistic look for our sitcom.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">For the trial run, I got someone to stand in as our model who has facial hair. As our main character has facial hair I felt that it made sense to get a model with the same features. The make-up testing wouldn't be fair if we practised on a female with a smooth face. Although, Beth is only testing the black eyes, the make-up will most likely be spread out over the face in order to blend it in and make it look more realistic. Therefore, it may get into the beard and it'll be better for Beth to practice on someone with facial hair, similarly to our main character. Also, in terms of the blood spatter, it'll be interesting to see how much it shows up on a beard. The hair may hide the blood or facial hair may simply just not work well with the blood. Our character may be wearing a surgical mask at the time of the splatter, however, it'll be beneficial to see how it&nbsp;reacts on a beard incase this looks better.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I met up with Beth for a trial run with the blood splatter and black eye make-up so we could go through the sort of look that we wanted. By meeting her in advice will save shooting time on the filming day. Beth asked a lot of questions about the story so she could decide on which type of black eye would be best. She explained to me that when someone gets punched in the face, it is usually their cheekbone which gets hit and bruised rather than the actual eye. This is because the cheekbone sticks out more than the eye and is the first part of the face which comes into contact with the hand during a punch. Beth asked about how many days the story of VET-MAN goes on for, as this can determine how dark the black eye will be. She explained that if Tim gets punched at the beginning of the story and the story concludes a few days later, the bruise may be made up of dark blues, reds and yellows around the whole eye, however, if we see Tim straight after the punch then it would be quite red just on the cheekbone. I explained that in the story Tim gets punched twice - one by Mollie after he kills the owl, and another once Sheila and Mark see Tim and Luke in the pub. The punch from Mollie is first in the story and this happens in the morning, and then Tim and Luke are seen in the pub in the afternoon, therefore, there will only be a short amount of time in between the punch and when we see Tim. Relating back to what Beth said about the change in colour and shape of a black eye over time, we agreed that this black eye should be slightly darker and have a bit more colour in it compared with the second black eye Tim receives. However, as it has only been a couple of hours it, the eye wouldn't be made up of yellows and dark blues just yet. To complete this black eye, Beth used a mixture of reds and blacks to create the eye in the photo below:</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-aZDXCStwC4Q/XGnTQadLn_I/AAAAAAAADFo/2bHqSkp_ixE5sSkvUhfkBVoi8oi_o3oYwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-17%2Bat%2B21.31.39.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="574" data-original-width="1504" height="244" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-aZDXCStwC4Q/XGnTQadLn_I/AAAAAAAADFo/2bHqSkp_ixE5sSkvUhfkBVoi8oi_o3oYwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-17%2Bat%2B21.31.39.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">First black eye in the story</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div style="text-align: center;"><div style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I was very pleased with the make-up, as it looked realistic and had the right colouring and shape to it as if it happened a few hours before. As a result of the timing of the punch, I didn't want the make-up too dark which I think Beth understood as well. After this Beth started with the second black eye. I&nbsp;explained to her that we see Tim approach Mark inside a pub, and then we see Tim outside with a bloody nose and second black eye. As the audience will be able to see that the black eye has just happened, we agreed on just colouring the cheekbone in a shade of red. This supports what Beth told me at the beginning of the trial - when&nbsp;someone is punched it is the cheekbone which takes the&nbsp;majority of the impact and therefore, this is the section of the face which needed to have make-up on. Having both eyes a different shade can help bring the realism into the sitcom. I believe it will add to the timing of the story, with the first punch being hours prior to the second, this can be seen in the different colours of the eyes.&nbsp;</span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/--m0y-6YO5dU/XGnTQ5hQdnI/AAAAAAAADFs/DucqSI4YDCA1L5Y5yW_GJ5xWsnDXZJJSwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-17%2Bat%2B21.31.51.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="650" data-original-width="1504" height="276" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/--m0y-6YO5dU/XGnTQ5hQdnI/AAAAAAAADFs/DucqSI4YDCA1L5Y5yW_GJ5xWsnDXZJJSwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-17%2Bat%2B21.31.51.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Second black eye in the story</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">There will be one scene when we see both eyes together - the final scene when Tim and Luke drive the van out of the car park. As a result&nbsp;of this, I told beth to keep one black eye on while she created the second so we could see what they look like together. After seeing both eyes together, I think&nbsp;that we made the right decision on the colouring as they look different to each other and you can tell that detail has been put into the make-up in order to give a realistic look to the film. Additionally, the colours can distinguish which black eye was made when during the story.</span><br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-W5XjpYpafhc/XHfN0euCrWI/AAAAAAAADMs/eq-lFz9oweAUsP9zqKfQBUiupT6SV1-bgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-28%2Bat%2B12.01.58.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="446" data-original-width="1278" height="222" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-W5XjpYpafhc/XHfN0euCrWI/AAAAAAAADMs/eq-lFz9oweAUsP9zqKfQBUiupT6SV1-bgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-28%2Bat%2B12.01.58.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Both black eyes</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Blood splatter:</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We were ready to test the blood splatter on the same person we&nbsp;trialled the black eye on, however, we&nbsp;didn't do this in the end. This test turned out to be more about which method gives the best splatter, and we could see this by spraying the blood into the air rather than on a face. During the Pre-Production unit, I asked Beth on her&nbsp;opinion of the blood splatter and what we could use to make the splatter look more realistic. Beth suggested a spray bottle filled with fake blood. This seems so simple, yet none of us thought of using a spray bottle in the previous unit. As a&nbsp;result of this, I made sure I brought one before the trial run to test out.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">When we were talking about the blood splatter, Beth suggested a Lucozade bottle which surprisingly enough we tested in the Transitions unit. Beth was confident this would work and was&nbsp;shocked when I explained and showed her my footage of when we tested the blood splatter in the Lucozade bottle previously, and how it&nbsp;didn't actually work very well.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I brought some fake blood for this trial run and as Alex said that he was able to source fake blood from our previous project, I only&nbsp;brought a small bottle. The fake blood&nbsp;bottle that I&nbsp;bought had a spray lid. In&nbsp;addition to the spray bottle, I felt that this was worth a test incase this spray lid worked with the blood better than the bottle. This was&nbsp;possible due to the spray lid coming with the bottle of fake blood - the tube which pumps the blood up towards the spray must be the correct size to cater for the fake blood. However, the spray bottle tube may be too thin and the thickness of the fake&nbsp;blood may be too much for it. Once we&nbsp;started spraying the blood out of the spray lid it came with we realised how thick it was. It&nbsp;didn't spray very well and just dropped onto the floor instead. Beth suggested mixing the blood with water, we tried this and it worked better. We tried this in the spray bottle and it worked well and actually sprayed the fake blood.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Prior to the trial Alex said that he would bring his water gun and we would use this like we did in the Transitions unit. I told Beth that this was another option, and showed her the footage from our tests with the gun as a blood splatter method. She said&nbsp;that it depends on what type of splatter we want, as this will determine whether we should use the water gun or the spray bottle. As this would be Alex's call as the director, I&nbsp;made a note to ask him what sort of spray he wanted before the shoot day so I&nbsp;could then inform Beth,&nbsp;preparing her for the type of spray we want her to create. Reading the script, Tim stabs the dog once which&nbsp;leads him to be covered in blood. In our Transitions unit, the vet was operating on the dog in surgery so he&nbsp;constantly stabbed the dog which led to multiple splatters. The difference between our Transitions film and this sitcom is that in this film, he&nbsp;accidentally stabs the dog once, meaning that there should only be the one splatter. With this in mind, the water gun may be the best option for the single splatter, however, the spray bottle may be&nbsp;beneficial for the look of the splatter after he has been hit with the water gun.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We ended the trial run with the knowledge of how well the spray bottle and spray lid works. Beth and I will be able to inform Alex of the result of both sprays and we&nbsp;already know how the water gun&nbsp;works, therefore, we should be fully prepared to work with the fake blood on the shoot day.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-NfS_sLdtPvk/XHR2S9OgHCI/AAAAAAAADMg/uEdjULQQ7O4mmXzZV8IwebtcopGuWMDRQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-25%2Bat%2B23.11.56.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="386" data-original-width="1296" height="190" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-NfS_sLdtPvk/XHR2S9OgHCI/AAAAAAAADMg/uEdjULQQ7O4mmXzZV8IwebtcopGuWMDRQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-25%2Bat%2B23.11.56.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Water gun Vs spray bottle</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Taking to Beth and getting her to practice beforehand was very beneficial for both of us. I learnt that the colour of black eyes change over a period of time. This seems obvious now but I hadn't thought of it prior to the trial run. If I&nbsp;didn't get an experienced make-up artist on board I would&nbsp;probably had to create the&nbsp;black eye myself and I would have just put black make-up around the eye, rather than thinking&nbsp;about the colours and how dark it would be in terms of where we are in the story.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Meeting Beth beforehand was an opportunity for me to get to know her as this was the first time I had met her. On the two shoot days that we need her for, she won't know any of the crew or cast, which may be a bit daunting for her. Therefore, I was eager to meet her and hopefully make her feel comfortable around me and then if she has any problems during the shoot days, she can come to me.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Beth said that getting someone&nbsp;with a similar amount of facial hair to our character was&nbsp;beneficial as the make-up blends outwards, rather than just being&nbsp;around the eye. Seeing the black eye on someone with a beard made it easier to picture on Tim. As a result of this, I was pleased with myself for thinking ahead and considering the facial hair.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Getting Beth involved before the shoot day was helpful&nbsp;because we were&nbsp;able to test a couple of methods for the blood splatter, this will save time on the shoot day as we have&nbsp;practiced it before. Beth also has a fresh mind into the project, and will be able to give us new ideas.&nbsp;</span>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-41639101167075670962019-02-13T17:15:00.000+00:002019-05-09T22:58:37.124+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Risk Assessments for Shoot Week (18th-22nd)<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I created risk assessments for each shoot day during the Pre-Production unit, so&nbsp;hypothetically we were ready to start filming from the end of that project. However, due to now knowing more detail about the filming days and what Alex is expecting to do on each day, I have updated the risk assessments accordingly. These now explain each and every hazard that is possible in each location and the methods we will carry out in order to control these hazards. I performed a location recce in the pre-production unit, and I visited St. Mary's Avenue in this unit, so the risk assessments are very accurate to the area. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Along with each risk assessment, I have created diagrams which highlight how we will control the hazards in a visual way. I have only made diagrams for the outside shoots because these hold the higher amount of risks. I felt the need to outline where people will be in according to the road in each outside location, and where the runner watching the traffic will be placed. I will also highlight where each crew and cast member will be standing and I will ensure they stay in their place and are not standing in the road throughout the shoot.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Monday 18th February - Sheila's house (Margate)</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Written risk assessment:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vSaBYapOFYXV7F8G_V3424IaOrgYCY2gNtqPsbi919zGB_b3XeUU5bwCYfjSa_4dvQ486RsEWfiTa6b/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />Visual risk assessment:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-LnexERSzvk4/XJFdAqJNIsI/AAAAAAAADWk/ot8JmLmbS_U71aVlac83O2cG510-SnnSwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.19.37.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="506" data-original-width="1440" height="140" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-LnexERSzvk4/XJFdAqJNIsI/AAAAAAAADWk/ot8JmLmbS_U71aVlac83O2cG510-SnnSwCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.19.37.png" width="400" /></a></div><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We are filming this scene on the drive of a house. The drive is big enough to fit two cars on so we have plenty of room once these cars are moved. However, we will want to get a wide shot of the house for the establishing shot. As a result of this, the camera will need to be positioned on the opposite side of the road. We will be on the path for this, and once the shot is complete, Katie will walk across the road and will be on the path on the same side as the house. Therefore, we will not be filming in the road for this scene, just on the pavements either side.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">When the DoP is getting the establishing shot from the other side of the road, myself and the runner will be watching the road. It is a quiet road, however, it can get busy&nbsp;during the day. As a&nbsp;result of this, I&nbsp;feel that two people should watch the traffic during the establishing shot. The runner will stand by Katie on the opposite side of the road, as shown in the diagram below, and I will stand on the other side of the road, on the path. Having me on this side of the road means that I will be on hand for anything that Alex or the cast and crew need. Having the runner stood on the opposite side of the road with Katie means that they will have a full view of the road and will be able to inform Katie of oncoming vehicles which could ruin the shot.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Looking at the shot list for VET-MAN, it seems as if this is the only shot which needs to be filmed from that distance from the house. As a result of this, the other shots will be able to be filmed from the safety of the drive.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hW6h6a-a4hY/XJEBw4iIaeI/AAAAAAAADT4/S7VeQjvuMB4AW2qBb5z7tL476ycV39WOwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B14.50.22.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="812" data-original-width="1266" height="410" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hW6h6a-a4hY/XJEBw4iIaeI/AAAAAAAADT4/S7VeQjvuMB4AW2qBb5z7tL476ycV39WOwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B14.50.22.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">When the cast and crew are filming on the drive towards the house, all cast and crew will be able to stand on the drive. The other shots we want to get are close ups of Luke and Sheila and these will be shot from the steps leading up to the front door, and from inside the house looking outside. I will place the runner at the back of the crew, nearest the path, so they can look for any members of the public walking up and down and who possibly look as if they want to ask what we are doing. As a result of this, the risks on this location are very low due to no one needing to stand in the road.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KYoYExT4l0U/XJEB61aZUCI/AAAAAAAADT8/511ZO87z51I6eLv0yZgXRENSY0LikxDhgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B14.51.07.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="738" data-original-width="1242" height="380" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KYoYExT4l0U/XJEB61aZUCI/AAAAAAAADT8/511ZO87z51I6eLv0yZgXRENSY0LikxDhgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B14.51.07.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Monday 18th February - St Mary's Avenue (Margate)</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Written risk assessment:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vRJdncuYewU0vLcJ_wG9Y-zaAVPd-GZ73uT0inQCh3RzoPfJ4W7pdnWcVEww18MDeMp1irbUBnpYCtj/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Visual risk assessment:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QGhjvurRwho/XJFeGN_qRII/AAAAAAAADWw/rOlL9bFg7k4oFmSp-g3plx2ogjs8MbhcwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.23.46.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="576" data-original-width="1424" height="161" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QGhjvurRwho/XJFeGN_qRII/AAAAAAAADWw/rOlL9bFg7k4oFmSp-g3plx2ogjs8MbhcwCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.23.46.png" width="400" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This is the scene when Tim and Luke run over the dog. We will be based outside on a quiet cul de sac road. This road also has an additional road leading off towards a small church car park. I have shown and explained the surroundings of the road to Alex and he wants to film on the right side of the road next to the grass, as shown in the diagram below. Due to the side in which the slogan is on, they will be driving on the left side of the road and will be pulling over to the left side of the road.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tim will be on the road side when getting out of the van. I will inform him to check his mirrors, while staying in character, as he would usually&nbsp;when getting out of a&nbsp;vehicle. I imagine this will be simple to follow due to the fact he drives a car&nbsp;regularly, therefore, he will be used to checking mirrors when being in control of his car. St Mary's Avenue is a quiet road and as we are filming in the middle of the day on a Monday,&nbsp;the majority of residents down the road&nbsp;should be at work. As I live around the corner from this road, each time I pass it I have checked the amount of cars that are down there. The&nbsp;amount is significantly less during the day than it is in the evening, therefore, I can be sure&nbsp;that there will be a small amount of active cars entering and&nbsp;leaving the road during our shoot day.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As well as asking Tim to check his&nbsp;mirrors, I will also inform our runner to look out for traffic entering and leaving the road. When they see a car coming&nbsp;towards us, they will shout for the director and cast to stop filming until the car has&nbsp;passed. As&nbsp;shown in the diagram below, our runner (R) is positioned on the opposite side of the road. I feel that this is the best position for them to be in, so they are in view of the whole road and are close enough to be able to talk over the road to the rest of&nbsp;the cast and crew. The direction in which I will ask them to look is highlighted with the two dotted lines. If I am not needed during the scene which is being shot as the time, I may stand with the runner, increasing the&nbsp;safety of our cast and crew. I have positioned the runner in that spot in the diagram below because they will have full view of the road which the van is on, but also the side road leading to the church. Ideally, any car that tries to enter the road either from the main road or from the side road will be seen by the runner and the rest of the crew and cast will be made aware. Like I said before, if I am unneeded at the time, I will stand with the runner to give an extra pair of eyes.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Every member of crew will also be wearing high-vis jackets. The cast and crew&nbsp;members who&nbsp;aren't in the shot at the time will be stood on the side of&nbsp;the road, away from filming and from the road.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3FrFH7eZq9o/XJETGUsq2-I/AAAAAAAADWQ/mfPf_8qygiAGGnDXJI-LaM77DrD2V8G5gCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B16.04.24.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="921" data-original-width="1600" height="368" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3FrFH7eZq9o/XJETGUsq2-I/AAAAAAAADWQ/mfPf_8qygiAGGnDXJI-LaM77DrD2V8G5gCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B16.04.24.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Once Tim has hit the dog, we see Tim and Luke standing over the dog on the side of the road (as shown in the diagram above). Our cast members will be standing on the grass side of the road, therefore, they will be in a safe position. However, if they are looking down into the road, our DoP and sound assistant will need to be in the road in order to be facing the dialogue and action (shown in the photo above). As we will be filming in the road here, the safety of our DoP and sound assistant is most&nbsp;important. Again, I will&nbsp;make sure the runner is standing on the opposite side of the road, and is in view of the whole road. If a car is&nbsp;approaching, they&nbsp;will call over to the director, DoP and sound assistant who will step out of the road until it is clear again.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to before, I may stand with the runner and help watch for traffic if I am not needed elsewhere. As</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;our DoP and sound assistant will be bent down in front&nbsp;of the van&nbsp;looking up to the cast in action, it may be safer for two pairs of eyes watching the road and the side road leading to the church. We need the camera in the position that the dog would be in for Tim&nbsp;and Luke to look down on. If the runner stays positioned as the diagram shows above, I can stand behind the DoP and sound assistant on the path on the&nbsp;opposite side of the road. T</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">hey will be concentrating&nbsp;with their&nbsp;backs to the road so the runner and I will have the whole road in view and we can act as their eyes. I will call over&nbsp;when a car enters the&nbsp;cul de sac, so they&nbsp;know when to stop filming and move to the grass.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we will be filming at the side of the road, there will be a big enough area&nbsp;next to the van where other&nbsp;cars will be able to drive around.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-7qoQ9DLlvmg/XJEDtCZBuvI/AAAAAAAADUU/azMkJ2uM284eIucUFIH7iZrLddHLL1FDQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B14.58.41.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="868" data-original-width="1524" height="364" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-7qoQ9DLlvmg/XJEDtCZBuvI/AAAAAAAADUU/azMkJ2uM284eIucUFIH7iZrLddHLL1FDQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B14.58.41.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Sheila will be approaching the van in the scene from the road which leads to the church car park. This is another quiet road, therefore, we shouldn't have a lot of trouble with cars driving by. However, walking across a road still poses a safety risk, therefore, it must be controlled. Due to not being in the main road anymore, I&nbsp;will tell&nbsp;the runner to stand by the side road, rather than across the road like they were in the other diagrams. They will stand as pictured below, on the edge of the grass, therefore, they will able to see both ends of the main road, and the side road. When Sheila crosses the road, the runner will be watching out for cars and will inform Sheila not to cross the road if a car approaches. Even if a car enters the&nbsp;cul de sac or a stationary car starts moving, we will stop filming until it is parked or has left the road. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The rest of the scene will be shot on the grass side, therefore, we will not be in the way of the road. The runner and I will only be on the opposite side of the road when needed, when the rest of the scene is being&nbsp;shot on the side of&nbsp;the road, we will be on hand with any problems that may arise.&nbsp;</span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-O3mdCcG31zI/XJFe1W9YwUI/AAAAAAAADW8/JUEl4h7xcCM-9z5uuHE8CCMW9ScmC1bWACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.27.24.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="691" data-original-width="1600" height="276" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-O3mdCcG31zI/XJFe1W9YwUI/AAAAAAAADW8/JUEl4h7xcCM-9z5uuHE8CCMW9ScmC1bWACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.27.24.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Scene 6 consists of Luke running back from Sheila's house and similarly to Sheila, his path is across the side road leading to the car park. I will have the runner stand in a similar place to watch for traffic along the main road and side road. The runner will be positioned as below, because if they stay where they are, they will be seen on camera.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-nCKnegEOQIs/XMm4Z9vk30I/AAAAAAAADuI/aGMdm_sWKn0PxK-hO5zhF3PkfHqLU1hoACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.16.02.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="766" data-original-width="1258" height="388" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-nCKnegEOQIs/XMm4Z9vk30I/AAAAAAAADuI/aGMdm_sWKn0PxK-hO5zhF3PkfHqLU1hoACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-05-01%2Bat%2B16.16.02.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Tuesday 19th February - The Bell Inn - Inside (Bearsted)</b><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we will be situated inside the&nbsp;pub, I&nbsp;didn't make a visual risk assessment for this scene.&nbsp;</span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b> <iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vSAZjhDUyQ08K2tR6VZK5hmcxgy776OSmHNklM1g8BK60bQbFLRr4ulOVEC7zurChKlYz6pmD-z-S1c/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Tuesday 19th February - The Bell Inn - Outside (Bearsted)</b><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Written risk assessment:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vSYfzSTS0vEV5yMScKXRTQQp64J0-fv97K2tvJ9aykazZgDI7nLnVrEHg0VmoWT6LFEielXxhOgXF6m/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Visual risk assessment:</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1HUNd5m_4_o/XJFfQhotEVI/AAAAAAAADXI/EYmLrQPh0pYj_UAdIG2XiblOB0UfHBLjQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.29.21.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="576" data-original-width="1426" height="161" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1HUNd5m_4_o/XJFfQhotEVI/AAAAAAAADXI/EYmLrQPh0pYj_UAdIG2XiblOB0UfHBLjQCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.29.21.png" width="400" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We have planned to use the back four car park spaces in at The Bell Inn, as pictured below (one space isn't drawn to make room for the crews positions). I have scheduled the crew call time for 8am and the cast call time for 9am, and the pub doesn't open until 11:30am so we have a good chance of getting these spaces as the public won't be visiting the pub at the time we will be getting there. I will be driving, along with Alex bringing the Vet Van, and our cast member for Tess is also driving. As we will all be there earlier than the punters, we can park in the back spaces and then we can move our cars when we want to film. This will allow us to save the spaces until we need them later on in the day, after the inside shoot.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The runner will be stood at the back of the van separating the filming area to the rest of the car park, as they will be watching for other cars. All crew members will be wearing high-vis jackets to be seen clearly by cars entering and exiting the car park.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-NVFcY-9hsM0/XJEFwHxdE-I/AAAAAAAADU0/qXwRMeQWncQ-V41YPhg6Oe-YPi4eNaaIwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B15.07.24.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="665" data-original-width="1600" height="264" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-NVFcY-9hsM0/XJEFwHxdE-I/AAAAAAAADU0/qXwRMeQWncQ-V41YPhg6Oe-YPi4eNaaIwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B15.07.24.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Towards the end of the scene, the Vet Van will reverse out from the space and towards the exit of the car park. However, the van will not be going onto the main road, it&nbsp;will stop before it gets to the exit. We need the van to be pulled into the space at&nbsp;the beginning due to&nbsp;the side in which the slogan is on, therefore, it has to reverse out. To stay on one side of the car park, the van will reverse out to the right, as shown below, and will drive pass the gate connecting the pub to the car park. Tim will be&nbsp;driving and I will inform him to check his mirrors when he conducts the reverse manoeuvre. Before the van reverses, I will tell the runner to move towards the gate connecting the pub to the car park, so we can easily inform Alex when a car enters the car park, and we will be able to tell punters who exit&nbsp;the pub through the gate to be careful as we are filming a moving vehicle through the car park.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1SYFwab9uME/XJEE_CLrykI/AAAAAAAADUk/a5AYAXoT5DYtZ1NMZQtTPbSr5tgA6RGCwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B15.04.00.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="663" data-original-width="1600" height="264" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1SYFwab9uME/XJEE_CLrykI/AAAAAAAADUk/a5AYAXoT5DYtZ1NMZQtTPbSr5tgA6RGCwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B15.04.00.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Thursday 21st February - Tess's house (Longfield)</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we are situated inside a house, I didn't make a visual assessment for this scene.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Written risk assessment:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vQCpuPilvUD_3THDFqmRGlg2LwTAbZmzX9InGkAO78Drp1db-LULQktukhY7TNp-7baIwOBK4eoljQy/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Friday 22nd February - House and Drive (Longfield)</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Written risk assessment:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <iframe height="500" src="https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vRDiHOje33qdlt3eTeiS979X1q8BVNQfbEXuf9clC2rHtE0YUdvm2utz2dW13exQ_TqhVwRsQIbi25h/pub?embedded=true" width="750"></iframe> <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Visual risk assessment:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-n7RhNzZvDQk/XJFf1DjvB4I/AAAAAAAADXU/xDArdI5BFkAbMFW4ENOZo52-0gdT2M60wCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.31.39.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="492" data-original-width="1450" height="135" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-n7RhNzZvDQk/XJFf1DjvB4I/AAAAAAAADXU/xDArdI5BFkAbMFW4ENOZo52-0gdT2M60wCLcBGAs/s400/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B21.31.39.png" width="400" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Similarly to the house in Margate, we will have the safety of a drive protecting the cast and crew, rather than standing on the road. There will be one take of the whole scene on a wide shot, and after that the remaining shots will be captured on the drive. As it can be seen below, the crew will only need to be stood on the opposite side of the road for the wide shot. I will position the runner opposite Tim so he will be close enough to inform him about any cars approaching. I understand that Tim will be concentrating on performing which is why I will position the runner as shown.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-EkrLF5w05y0/XJELCW00ARI/AAAAAAAADVE/aq3GIMzbip82C6bHk4S-bJOLYVeqMWeywCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B15.30.00.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="824" data-original-width="1600" height="328" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-EkrLF5w05y0/XJELCW00ARI/AAAAAAAADVE/aq3GIMzbip82C6bHk4S-bJOLYVeqMWeywCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B15.30.00.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I said previously, the remaining shots will be captured on the drive as shown below. I have previously visited the house and drive and there is a grass patch around the drive so we will be able to stand a with a bit of space rather than all squeezing on the drive. As everyone will be focusing on their crew and cast roles, I will position the runner just off centre to watch the area. They can help any members of public who have any questions instead of interrupting us.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-1UBGNL_Llus/XJEK15XJINI/AAAAAAAADVA/S9Z2-ppma3caEeCaaS8SRi2arMF80sFowCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B15.29.07.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="540" data-original-width="1042" height="330" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-1UBGNL_Llus/XJEK15XJINI/AAAAAAAADVA/S9Z2-ppma3caEeCaaS8SRi2arMF80sFowCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-03-19%2Bat%2B15.29.07.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I am confident that I will be able to carry these risk assessments and control methods into the shoot week, with the aim of keeping all cast, crew, public and contributors safe throughout production.&nbsp;</span></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-8926958299718359462019-02-13T09:49:00.001+00:002019-05-09T22:58:21.438+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Preparation for Shoot Week (18th-22nd)<b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Costume</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In terms of costume, I had to ensure each cast member brought the correct clothes for each shoot day. For the characters for Tess and Sheila, as we haven't filmed with them yet, it was a case of simply reminding them of what clothes they needed to bring. For Tess, this was smart clothing which she said she had and was happy to wear for us. Tess is in two scenes, however, for her clothing the only change is that she will be wearing a coat at the pub over her smart clothing. Therefore, her clothing was relatively easy. Sheila's clothing was also easy, we told her to bring anything she wanted that she would wear on a regular day. I informed her that I would be buying her a light pink cardigan as this will get fake blood on it, and obviously we don't want to get her own clothes dirty. Sheila is also in two scenes, similar to Tess, however, we simply just need her to change into another set of clothes she may wear on a regular day. The pink cardigan is just for the day when Luke visits her house in Margate (Monday 18th)</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The characters for Tim and Luke were more&nbsp;difficult as we have already filmed them. As I&nbsp;didn't schedule the shoot days in order, which is quite&nbsp;normal for real film productions, I had to sit down and work out which costumes they&nbsp;would need,&nbsp;in terms of the clothing they had worn in the previous scenes at the Owl Academy. I worked out&nbsp;their costume schedule as:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />Monday <br />Tim - scrubs and black hoodie</span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Luke - g</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">rey hoodie, g</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">reen top, green coat, black jeans &amp; black vans (same as 7th Feb shoot day)</span></div><div><br /></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Tuesday<br />Tim - green/grey t</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">rousers, blue top, blue hoodie (same as 6th Feb shoot day)</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Luke - l</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">ight blue jeans, red hoodie &amp; white top (same as 6th Feb shoot day)</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />Thursday<br />Tim - scrubs, black hoodie, mask<br /><br />Friday <br />Tim - black hoodie and scrubs<br />Luke - g</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">rey hoodie, g</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">reen top, green coat, black jeans &amp; black vans (same as 7th Feb shoot day)</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I brought two of each pieces of clothing we were providing so we had a clean item and an item ready to get dirty, for rehearsal and reshoot purposes. Therefore, Tim has two black zipped hoodies, Luke has two light grey hoodies and Sheila has two light pink cardigans.</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Props</b></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">To ensure I had all the correct props organised I made an updated list of the props needed from the final script (Draft 8). I made an initial list in the Pre-Production unit, however, as the scripts have changed so have the props. The props below are being provided by me and Alex and a couple have been brought with our budget.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />Scene 1 - Tess’s house (Thursday 21st)<br />- scrubs <br />- mask<br />- photos of skevy<br />- frames<br />- printer<br />- diploma<br />- usb stick<br />- bring mac<br />- smart bag<br />- doctors bag<br /><br />Scene 2 - House with the drive (Friday 22nd)<br />- doctors bag<br />- van<br />- van keys<br />- fake drugs for glove compartment <br /><br />Scene 4 - Road in Margate (Monday 18th)<br />- screwdrivers (philips &amp; flathead)<br />- vet van<br />- stethoscope<br />- latex gloves<br />- syringe<br />- scalpel<br />- fake blood<br />- fake cat</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- something to run over</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />Scene 5 - Sheila’s house (Monday 18th)<br />- bin bag and carpet<br />- tissues<br /><br />Scene 6 - driving away from Sheila’s house (Monday 18th)<br />- fake cat<br />- vet van<br /><br />Scene 12 - inside the Bell Inn (Tuesday 19th)<br />- pint glasses of drink<br />- bloody tissues<br />- fake blood<br />- black eye makeup<br />- doctors bag<br />- vet van</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Food</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />As a result of the cold weather and the fact that we are filming outside on the 18th February (shoot day 3), 19th February (shoot day 4) and 22nd February (shoot day 6), I felt that it was best to organise warm cooked meals. Due to not being near any cooking facilities at the Kent Owl Academy, we had to eat at the local Beefeater for both days. As a result of this, I don't want to take the cast and crew out for many more meals due to wanting to give them healthy choices.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On Tuesday 19th February, we are filming at the Bell Inn pub where I have budgeted and arranged us to eat lunch there. However, the other three shoot days, we are filming at houses which means that we can cook food. Especially as our two main characters, Tim and Luke are with us for the majority of these days, I didn't want to take them out everyday as this can become&nbsp;very unhealthy and we want them energetic for our shoot days, and their food will play a part in this. It would also cost us a lot more on the budget to take everyone out every day, therefore, I only sorted the meals out for days when we had no other choice.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">From the audition forms that the cast filled out when we first met them I found out about&nbsp;specific&nbsp;dietary requirements. The&nbsp;only one that was stated was&nbsp;vegetarian which made the meal&nbsp;plans&nbsp;slightly easier. I also contacted the&nbsp;additional crew to find out if they had any&nbsp;specific&nbsp;dietary&nbsp;requirements so I could cater for each person appropriately.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I set out a meal plan and sent it on to the cast and crew to give them an idea on what I was thinking for food for&nbsp;the following week, then I was able to&nbsp;make any amendments and update everyone on the food situation.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Meal plan:</span><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ysYwR9qgRkI/XG7wQVGZSeI/AAAAAAAADHE/4Hkcf0WCZMMoKifklvPyjyBzTQzryt5lwCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-21%2Bat%2B18.37.47.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1102" data-original-width="754" height="640" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ysYwR9qgRkI/XG7wQVGZSeI/AAAAAAAADHE/4Hkcf0WCZMMoKifklvPyjyBzTQzryt5lwCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-21%2Bat%2B18.37.47.png" width="436" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Meal plan for shoot week</td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I roughly calculated the time in which it would take to cook the food on the Monday, Thursday and Friday so I could check that it would fit in for when I scheduled our lunch breaks on the shooting schedule. As Katie, Alex and I need to keep to our job roles throughout the whole of production, we cannot spend time preparing the meals. As a result of this, on the Monday I asked my mum to help out with the food. This works well as we are eating at my house, she knows the kitchen and I wouldn't need to get someone who didn't know where everything was. This could also prevent a cooking hazard as the person who is cooking the food knows what they are doing in their own house. The beef lasagne wouldn't take long to cook, but the jacket potato would take slightly longer. In order to keep to the schedule and to eat at 13:00, I have arranged with my mum to put the jacket potatoes in for 11:00. This is slightly longer than what they need but these can be kept warm in the oven at the end if we have finished earlier or later than we expect.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We had a slight change with one of our cast members the weekend before our shoot week. She was only available for the Monday morning rather than all day due to an important appointment. This still suited us rather than changing the shoot day due to the amount of people helping us on our shoot. We just have to make sure we get all her scenes done first as well as we can. When I was arranging this with our cast member, I realised that she would need to leave before we break for lunch. Due to her getting the train straight to London from Margate for the appointment, I decided to ask her if she wanted me to get her a sandwich, crisps and other bits of food for her train journey. I apologised that it wouldn't be a hot meal but it was something. She was so grateful for me thinking of her even though she was only going to be with us for a short amount of time and she told me what type of lunch she would prefer. I will be able to keep it fresh in the fridge rather than if she had brought it herself to the shoot, so it made sense for me to get it ready for her. We are very grateful for her coming to Margate for the short period of time, so it's the least I could do, but I appreciated the gratification she showed.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On the Thursday we are filming at Katie's house so I let her buy the food that she wanted cooked at hers. On this filming day, one of our cast members is vegetarian, along with Katie but apart from these two, every other cast and crew member are meat eaters. As a result of the vegetarian cast member, I reminded Katie of this dietary requirement so she catered more than herself being vegetarian. Katie decided to do pizzas, one meat and one veggie, and as an alternative, a vegetable pasta bake which was actually vegan. We had a runner cooking the food so myself, Katie and Alex and the other crew members could focus on our own job roles.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On the Friday we have Katie's mum to help us out, and again as we are filming at her house she will know what she is doing in her own kitchen. As a result of this, Katie, Alex and I are able to concentrate on our own job roles rather than worrying about preparing the meals. I explained to her that we are thinking of getting a take away as it is the last day of filming. Katie's mum explained to me that the choices we have in Longfield are pizza, Chinese, Indian or fish and chips. Due to having pizza on the day before, and I felt as if Chinese and Indian weren't quite appropriate for the situation, I decided to go for fish and chips. The fish and chip shop does a variety of foods, such as sausages, burgers and of course, fish. If people just fancy chips instead, then they can just have them. Due to the shop being a 3 minute drive from Katie's, I felt that this was easiest due to time. As it's not far, we can eat quicker and get back to filming quicker.</span><br /><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Letter for residents</b><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to the&nbsp;nature of the dog hit scene, I wanted to inform the residents of St Mary's Avenue&nbsp;about what we were doing. I have already&nbsp;informed the house in which we will ideally be filming in front of, but I&nbsp;wanted to&nbsp;inform the rest of the road as we will be using fake blood and we may be on the road for whole morning and possibly into early afternoon. To do this I created a letter to post through each door on the road, informing the residents on what we would be doing. I left my personal email for them to&nbsp;contact if they had any questions. I&nbsp;posted this&nbsp;letter through the&nbsp;door the week before the shoot day, giving them time to contact me.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span> <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-cOAMsd-B4-s/XLzhohdxCeI/AAAAAAAADjE/rjTaa6WjuS0z1kniOcBFNotd4V6-d4qNQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-21%2Bat%2B22.32.36.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="960" data-original-width="1278" height="480" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-cOAMsd-B4-s/XLzhohdxCeI/AAAAAAAADjE/rjTaa6WjuS0z1kniOcBFNotd4V6-d4qNQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-04-21%2Bat%2B22.32.36.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Letter for residents</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Extra's&nbsp;consent form</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to filming at The Bell Inn before it opens / just as it's opened, we run&nbsp;the risk of not having anyone in the background. As a&nbsp;result of the pub scene being set in the afternoon, it&nbsp;would be inevitable that there would be people in the pub enjoying their evening. Due to this, we have invited friends and family to be extras in the pub. We&nbsp;thought that this is easier than hiring professional actors as the extras just need to sit in the pub and&nbsp;talk to each other. These roles&nbsp;aren't&nbsp;speaking roles, therefore, we felt this was best in terms of practicality and ease. As the extras are friends and family, they will be more likely to want to help us out, and be willing to transport themselves to the location. Even if they just want to see what&nbsp;we've been up to.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Although, the extras are&nbsp;friends and family, I have created a extra's consent form for them to sign. This can be used for security for the shots for our film&nbsp;because "</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">actor who doesn’t sign a release might later ask you not to use the footage" (Maggie, 2013) if they don't like the way they're portrayed or decide that they&nbsp;don't like the nature of the film they are involved in. As a&nbsp;result of having the extra's sign the consent form&nbsp;means that they have signed and agreed for us to use the shots with them featured in, even if they change their mind.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I researched further into&nbsp;consent forms and how to act when facing the extra's with the forms:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br />"First and foremost, you must HAVE all the necessary forms.&nbsp;You also must BRING them to every shoot.&nbsp;You must ask nicely for people to sign!&nbsp;Last but not least… always try to get forms signed up front!" (Maggie, 2013)</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I will take this advice on&nbsp;during the shoot day at the Bell Inn. I&nbsp;will ensure that every extra signs the forms when they arrive, and I will make sure I am polite when asking. We will only need the extra's for the one day so I&nbsp;shouldn't need to bring the forms to any other shoot days,&nbsp;however I will keep them in my car on each shoot day so I have them on me just in&nbsp;case.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1FGHV5ftTbI/XGfjcxhILjI/AAAAAAAADE8/u6gJXGvGjx0djjLGtVXpZ3d-s4ZuEwX9ACLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-16%2Bat%2B10.17.59.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1052" data-original-width="758" height="640" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1FGHV5ftTbI/XGfjcxhILjI/AAAAAAAADE8/u6gJXGvGjx0djjLGtVXpZ3d-s4ZuEwX9ACLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-16%2Bat%2B10.17.59.png" width="459" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Extra's consent form</span></td></tr></tbody></table><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I will bring additional forms for extra&nbsp;members of public who may enter the pub while we are still filming. Therefore, if they agree to be in the background of our film, I can get their signature on the form and then we will be able to use the footage no matter what.&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">While conducting my research, I found out about a filming notice. A filming notice "allows you to skip all the paperwork when you're in a public place" (Maggie, 2013), such as in a supermarket or coffee shop. By placing a filming notice on a wall in the public location, it essentially states that filming is being conducted here and if&nbsp;someone walks into frame they are agreeing to be in the film. A filming notice may also be&nbsp;beneficial for when we film at The Bell Inn. I could place one on each door that allows the public to enter the pub. Therefore, it is somewhere where it'll be seen and it's subsequently easier than getting people to sign extra's consent forms. However, I&nbsp;must remember that these forms are only applicable for people who are&nbsp;solely seen in the film by passing in the&nbsp;background. If we want a particular person in shot, they'll need to sign an extra's consent form or an artist contract.</span></div><div><br /></div><div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-UFI4dukfaBc/XGfkDXqnsiI/AAAAAAAADFI/BNxktKb1T5wZVHS6TfZxUIpfia0jd6wkgCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-16%2Bat%2B10.20.37.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1084" data-original-width="804" height="640" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-UFI4dukfaBc/XGfkDXqnsiI/AAAAAAAADFI/BNxktKb1T5wZVHS6TfZxUIpfia0jd6wkgCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-16%2Bat%2B10.20.37.png" width="474" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Filming notice</span></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I made sure to make the heading of this form big and bold for the public to see. By stating 'Important - PLEASE READ', should&nbsp;persuade people to take a note of the letter. I also stated what to do if a member of the public doesn't want to be seen on the camera - notifying a crew or staff member and then we can do our best to not get them seen on the camera. We want to cater for everyone while we are&nbsp;there and not become an&nbsp;inconvenience to anyone,&nbsp;especially within the pub that the landlord has willingly let us use for our film. We want to make sure his customers are happy while we are there.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Location release form</b></span></div><div><br /></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Location release forms can be beneficial if you want to film on location and "you need to get permission to shoot from the owner" (Rocket Lawyer, n/d). These can help "secure the site"&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">(Rocket Lawyer, n/d)</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;so that filming is allowed to happen at the particular location.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The owner of a private location may seem like they are happy to participate in the production of a film, however "without the proper legal documents, you have no power when it comes to release and usage"&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">(Motion Arrary, 2015). This may become very difficult if after everything is shot, the location owner decides they&nbsp;don't want to be a part of the film.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I have already contacted The Bell Inn, and we have conducted a test shoot there as well. The pub&nbsp;landlord seems really keen and I&nbsp;can't imagine that he will change his mind after we've visited a few times and even for a&nbsp;test shoot. However, this&nbsp;isn't certain. As a&nbsp;result of this, I felt that I should create a&nbsp;location release form in which the landlord can sign to agree that we can use his premise in our film. Sometimes, the location may drop out due to the nature of the film. They may decide that they don't want their premises to be a part of a film that they don't agree with. As we will be representing the idea of someone getting punched at the pub, they may decide that they don't want that particular activity being portrayed on their site, even though we won't actually being seeing the punch. We will just see Tim outside with a black eye and bloody nose. Everything must be taken into consideration.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I didn't give one of these to the staff at The Kent Owl Academy because Alex knows the owner and we were guaranteed the access to film wherever we wanted on site. Due to the owner being close with Alex's family, I felt comfortable knowing that they wouldn't go back on their word. However, I don't know the Bell Inn landlord, I have only approached him for this project, therefore, he may be more likely to go change his mind due to the reason as to why I have created this form. As they've had film crews at the pub before, this shouldn't be a new experience for them, however, signing a release form is the safest option for our project as nothing is certain.</span></div><div><br /></div><div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-V8_jN3SgxwU/XGfjEx1RwRI/AAAAAAAADEw/ujqPvQj-zmYBVLyR-t5GCN8pZHbZVK68gCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-16%2Bat%2B10.16.28.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1092" data-original-width="868" height="640" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-V8_jN3SgxwU/XGfjEx1RwRI/AAAAAAAADEw/ujqPvQj-zmYBVLyR-t5GCN8pZHbZVK68gCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-16%2Bat%2B10.16.28.png" width="508" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Location release form</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div></div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Weather</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Thinking ahead to the weather, I checked the&nbsp;forecast for the next week. Our shoot week starts in 3 days, therefore, I feel that this is the best day to check and it will be more accurate than if I checked a few weeks ago. Weather is an&nbsp;important factor which could impact on our filming if it's bad. It would also mean that I may have to reschedule shoot days if it does rain. Due to the&nbsp;importance of the weather, I looked at the Met Office, which I believe is the most accurate weather forecast. From past experiences, I&nbsp;have found the Met Office to be more up-to-date than the BBC and ITV weather channels. Additionally, my brother works as a window cleaner, therefore, his career depends on the weather each day. He uses the Met Office to plan his jobs, as a&nbsp;result of this, I believe that I am using the most accurate weather&nbsp;website to&nbsp;predict the weather for our shoot days.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I will keep checking the weather over the next 3 days in case it changes, but as we have had good weather over this past week, I like to think it will&nbsp;continue&nbsp;into the next week.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Looking at the Met Office, my thoughts are confirmed and the weather is looking very good for our shoot days.&nbsp;Surprisingly good as we are only in February. It is still looking quite cold, even though it's sunny on most days. As a result of this, I will remind the cast and crew to bring coats and warm clothes for filming outside.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-vuQNjHKWTX4/XGfTyt--pdI/AAAAAAAADEg/QJE07BturvcgdmHhmPHnWPMn4syRic_wQCLcBGAs/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-16%2Bat%2B09.11.01.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="444" data-original-width="1600" height="177" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-vuQNjHKWTX4/XGfTyt--pdI/AAAAAAAADEg/QJE07BturvcgdmHhmPHnWPMn4syRic_wQCLcBGAs/s640/Screen%2BShot%2B2019-02-16%2Bat%2B09.11.01.png" width="640" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Weather forecast for 18th-22nd</span></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Reflection</span></b><br /><b><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></b>- <span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I found that noting down each&nbsp;aspect of our shoot days to make sure I have thought of everything very&nbsp;beneficial.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I believe that each one of the forms I have created will help us in production. I want to treat everyone equally, even members of public&nbsp;who are around the pub on the 19th Feb. It&nbsp;wouldn't be fair to let them walk in if they&nbsp;didn't want to be shown on camera. In addition to this, it&nbsp;wouldn't be fair to&nbsp;film down St. Mary's&nbsp;Avenue without&nbsp;the residents&nbsp;knowing about it. Due to this, I can imagine that the forms will come in really helpful.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Making a meal plan prior to&nbsp;filming will allow the cast and crew to see what we are planning on&nbsp;doing for food. By doing this, they will be able to contact me if they aren't sure on some of the meals, or have a&nbsp;dietary requirement that they&nbsp;forgot to write about on the&nbsp;audition form when we initially met them.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I am&nbsp;hopeful that the weather will stay as predicted and that we will have a successful shoot week. I have printed the shot list and production&nbsp;schedule, ready to revise for the shoot days to ensure we get all the footage we need.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>References:</i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-style: italic;">-&nbsp;</span><span style="font-style: italic; text-align: -webkit-center;">Maggie. (2013).&nbsp;</span><span style="font-style: italic; text-align: -webkit-center;">Why Do Release Forms Matter?</span><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;"><i>&nbsp;Available: http://stillmotionblog.com/why-release-form/. Last accessed 13th Feb 2019.</i></span></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;"><i><br /></i></span></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><span style="text-align: -webkit-center;">-&nbsp;</span>Rocket Lawyer. (n/d).&nbsp;Location Release basics.&nbsp;Available: https://www.rocketlawyer.com/document/location-release.rl#/. Last accessed 13th Feb 2019.</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">-&nbsp;</span>Motion Array. (2015).&nbsp;Talent &amp; Location Releases: When &amp; What Do You Need?.&nbsp;Available: https://motionarray.com/blog/talent-location-releases-when-what-do-you-need. Last accessed 13th Feb 2019.</i></span></div></div>Melissa Moore Television Journalhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01830434643264581227noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-337959305892608759.post-90062425702247821252019-02-12T16:57:00.000+00:002019-05-09T22:58:09.639+01:00MAJOR PROJECT: Initial Editing Research<span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>The rough cut is the first stage in which the film begins to resemble its final product.</i></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Katie and I are sharing the editing role in&nbsp;the project. Katie, as director of photography, will be in charge of the colour grade and&nbsp;because of this, we felt&nbsp;that it would make sense for her to&nbsp;complete the fine cut for the film. This left me with&nbsp;the rough cut which I was happy to do. As we are working together and I will be passing the edit onto her when I feel it is best to, I wanted to carry out some research in order to find out exactly how far I need to take&nbsp;the rough cut before&nbsp;passing it over. I&nbsp;wouldn't want to do too little and then Katie have to pick up something&nbsp;which should have been&nbsp;completed in the&nbsp;rough cut. To work together successfully I want to completely finish my role in&nbsp;the rough cut before passing it over. In&nbsp;addition to this, as I was initially the producer of the&nbsp;project,&nbsp;completing the rough cut will allow me to make creative choices&nbsp;within the edit which I may not have been able to access if I was just the producer and not a producer / editor.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Throughout my research I discovered a video with Jason Tomaric, an Emmy-winning director/cinematographer, Brad Schwartz, an Emmy-winning editor for&nbsp;<i>Top Chef</i>, and Barry Zetlin,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Emmy-winning television and film editor&nbsp;explaining the requirements for a rough cut. They continue to explain that the assem</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">bly cut is first and then next is the rough cut.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Stages of the&nbsp;rough cut include:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Logging</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Syncing audio</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Assembly cut&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Rough cut&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Directors cut</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Logging&nbsp;</b>is the very first stage of post-production. It involves sorting all the dailies (raw, unedited footage) so they are properly labelled. Organising all the footage will allow the editor to work more efficiently to make a cut. In a big post-production house, there will be edit assistants who do the logging for the main editor. However, as we are only a small production group, I will be logging and organising the footage as part of my rough cut role. The edit assistants, directors and cinematographers will also leave notes on takes to help give context to the editor as it's likely to be the first time the editor would have seen the film footage. I was at each shoot day, I knew the plan of shots and the structure of the story from being the script editor. As a result of this, I already knew about the film and what shots I expected to receive. Therefore, when I am logging the footage and audio, I shouldn't need to make any notes.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Jason and Brad&nbsp;didn't mention&nbsp;<b>syncing audio</b>&nbsp;so I looked further into what this consisted of. From the transitions unit, I know why I need sync the audio as we filmed the sound separately to the footage and the mouths need to match with the dialogue, however, I felt that if I researched further into this technique, I may learn something new or gain advice to keep in mind when syncing the audio. I found a video by editor, Corey Machado, and he suggested&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">using a clapperboard or just simply clapping with hands while&nbsp;filming a take is ideal to peak the&nbsp;audio ready for the edit. It makes "it easy to see and hear the sync mark" (Machado, 2016). Fortunately, we used the clapperboard in the majority of scenes, apart from the&nbsp;surgery scene of the dog in the van and the night scene. As the rest of the&nbsp;audio should be able to be&nbsp;synced relatively easy with the clapperboard, these may be the only times when I may struggle.&nbsp;Machado also explained that the "video needs scratch audio&nbsp;recorded otherwise&nbsp;they'll be no reference to the sync mark" (Machado, 2016). The scratch audio is essentially the quieter audio track that comes from the camera. We should have this on each footage clip, and along with the clapperboard, it will help me in trying to&nbsp;match up the audio to the footage. The&nbsp;clapperboard is&nbsp;beneficial to have as&nbsp;I will able to see the footage of the board and the scene and take number, and I can hear the clap and the scene and take&nbsp;number from the audio. However, ideally I&nbsp;will be able to match up the scratch&nbsp;audio to the main audio in order to&nbsp;successfully sync the&nbsp;audio. In addition to&nbsp;this, I will be able to check the footage of the clapperboard to&nbsp;make sure it matches the sound of the clap, rather than&nbsp;solely relying on matching the&nbsp;audio levels. This is how I synced the&nbsp;audio in the Transitions Unit and it worked well.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The&nbsp;<b>assembly cut</b>&nbsp;is "editing the movie to the script" (Tomaric, n/d). This is the first draft of the movie edit in which the director has the opportunity to see the movie for the first time. This stage of the edit can be time-consuming,&nbsp;challenging and stressful, a well-crafted assembly cut lays the foundation of the film, ready for the rough cut. I imagine that I will be able to create the assembly cut after I have synced the audio and I have one complete cut of the film on the timeline.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The&nbsp;<b>rough cut&nbsp;</b>occurs after the assembly cut. By now there should be one cut of the film on the timeline and if there is, Jason next explains that this is the time in which you can start "changing scenes, shortening / lengthening parts of the&nbsp;story, addressing pacing issues, strengthening characters and&nbsp;improving the emotional intensity of the&nbsp;story" (Tomaric, n/d). As we are creating a comedy, the pacing&nbsp;will be very important to the humour. Quick fast-paced cuts will add to the humour whereas slower cuts and shots will prevent the humour from&nbsp;occurring. As a result of this, I will deal with the timing of the film in the rough cut. To do this, I will be shortening parts of the&nbsp;story. As comedy comes from quick cuts, I imagine that I will be shortening scenes rather than lengthening them.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As well as pacing, the characters will be a big part of the rough cut. I will need to ensure their personalities come through in the edit. VET-MAN is&nbsp;inspired by&nbsp;<i>The&nbsp;Thick Of It&nbsp;</i>which is why we have shot the scenes handheld and have included many zooms in the takes. The zooms will help build the characters as we have mainly used this technique when Tim and Luke say something&nbsp;stupid or comedic. In&nbsp;order to bring out Tim's arrogant and over-confident personality and Luke's naive and impressionable personality, I will make sure I include many zooms&nbsp;from the takes rather than cutting around them. By including the zooms I will be able to strengthen the characters for the audience to understand their different personalities.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Continuing in my&nbsp;research, Brad Schwartz advises asking questions&nbsp;while editing the film, "</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">how can I enhance the story? Can I move scenes around? Can I restructure the elements that I&nbsp;already have to make this a more powerful story?" (Schwartz, n/d). These questions&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">will be&nbsp;helpful to keep in mind and answer while I am creating the rough cut. Just&nbsp;because Alex has&nbsp;written the script in a certain way, doesn't mean parts of the story may look better and make more sense being moved around. I also&nbsp;need to keep any eye out for the structure of the story similarly to the writer of the project, for example, making sure it "move[s] from point A, to point B, to point C. Does it have a logical beginning, middle and end?" (Schwartz, n/d). Just because the script made sense and had a good structure doesn't mean the edit will look the same. With Alex, we can review the rough cut of the film to make sure the story flows as well as the script did. An early rough cut, after the assembly cut is finished, is an opportunity to</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;view the movie on its own - divorced from the script.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Here we can cut and move parts of the story around if it needs it.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Finally, the rough cut is about "smoothing it out and making it more presentable" (Zetlin, n/d), it should also start to look like the final project, in terms of footage. The sound effects&nbsp;will come in later in the fine cut, so this stage is&nbsp;primarily about the footage and how the film will look at the end. I imagine that the film will start looking like the final product by the time it's a few rough cuts in. As I found out previously, the first draft will be the&nbsp;assembly cut and will simply be putting the footage on the timeline with minimal tweaks, the second rough cut will include any&nbsp;input from Alex as the director, and by the time I am on the third draft, we should have had some viewings from our tutors. As a result of the film going through these stages, it will slowly start to resemble the final film towards the end of my part of the edit. I will aim to get it looking like the final product before I pass it onto Katie so I can be sure that the rough cut is complete.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The&nbsp;<b>directors cut&nbsp;</b>is when the&nbsp;director focuses "entirely on working with the editor to refine the cut of the film" (New York Film&nbsp;Academy, 2017) and&nbsp;helps the editor reorder, remove and change scenes and shots with extreme attention to detail. This is also a good opportunity to discover plot holes and missing shots that may require re-shoots. In my post-production schedule I have highlighted different days when I will sit down with Alex and watch through the edit so far. My aim is to get a full cut of the film ready for Alex to look at, he will then take notes and I will complete these by the next time he is scheduled to see it.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Editing comedy</b></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I am the p</span></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">roducer of VET-MAN as well as being co-editor. The producers main role occurs during pre-production, and as a result of that, I wanted a more important role during post-production. I aim to create the rough cut of VET-MAN, and once I have passed it onto Katie I will return to my producer role and concentrate on the marketing of VET-MAN for the rest of the Major Project Unit.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to being the editor of our VET-MAN mockumentary, I have previously conducted research into editing comedy. Nevertheless, we changed the&nbsp;genre of VET-MAN to a sitcom, rather than a mockumentary, and as my previous research was focused on editing mockumentaries,&nbsp;now is a good opportunity to&nbsp;research into&nbsp;sitcom editing. During my mockumentary research, I found out that as we are shooting it in a documentary style I had to include the fly-on-the-wall type shots in the edit, however, now I am editing a&nbsp;sitcom my initial thoughts are that I will be able to use more close ups in&nbsp;order to follow the action and comedy.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As we changed the genre, I now need to look into editing a sitcom. One of Alex's&nbsp;inspirations for VET-MAN was&nbsp;<i>The Thick Of It&nbsp;</i>and I knew he wanted it shot and&nbsp;edited in a similar way to this show. To start my research, I felt it was best to look into the editors of&nbsp;<i>The Thick Of It&nbsp;</i>as it's the same&nbsp;style that we want to follow. Initially, I found Anthony Boys,&nbsp;editor of&nbsp;<i>Veep, Fresh Meat, </i>as well as<i>&nbsp;The Thick Of It.&nbsp;</i>He had conducted an&nbsp;interview with Dublin Editors and he answered some of the questions I had already noted down to ask an editor if I was to&nbsp;contact one. Before I did this, I looked into this interview first as it may hold the answers to my questions and give&nbsp;additional&nbsp;advice into editing comedy.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Boys explains that he&nbsp;didn't always work with comedy, he started working in entertainment TV for the first five years of his television career, and he worked on shows such as&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">The Salon&nbsp;</i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">and&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Cash In The Attic.&nbsp;</i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">He then had his big break in comedy with Armando Iannucci, who was making a show called&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Time Trumpet. </i><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Boys</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;was supposed to do two weeks with Iannucci, but stayed for three months and ended up cutting two&nbsp;episodes of&nbsp;</span><i style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Time Trumpet.&nbsp;</i><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Boys continues by&nbsp;answering the question:<i>&nbsp;"You obviously love what you’re doing; what do you love most about your job? And what do you love least about your job?"&nbsp;</i>I was interested by this question to see if I can relate to his answer. In order to edit our sitcom well, I&nbsp;believe&nbsp;that I need to be in the same mindset of an editor, otherwise it&nbsp;won't be successful. Boys says that he "loves making people laugh" (Boys, n/d). He is addicted to seeing people giggling behind their hand, combined with the 'you're not supposed to say that on television" sort of reaction. I&nbsp;believe that I need to be enjoying my work,&nbsp;especially the end product when showing someone. I want them to have the same reaction as&nbsp;Boys as he likes people to laugh when looking at his work - the 'I can't believe you've just done that on television'. I have learnt that if I&nbsp;don't get that reaction then maybe I am creating the wrong sequences.<br /><br />I took on some advice from the interview with Boys - "watch every single frame, especially in comedy" (Boys, n/d). Boys explains that while editing there is rarely one best take, there are usually three or four options which enhance the comedy of the scene in a particular way. As a result of this, it's beneficial to know all the takes because once you start changing the scene around, those takes will change.&nbsp;Also, with the amount of times that you can steal a look or a reaction from a completely different part of the scene to put somewhere else for comic effect you have to know where those are, they have to be stuck in your mind somewhere. Otherwise you can’t make the best scene possible, because of this Boys advices to watch every single second. I was&nbsp;able to put this piece of&nbsp;advice into practice quite early on into the edit as Katie put together the first two days of footage we got&nbsp;from the Owl Academy. She did this to&nbsp;determine whether or not we would need to re-shoot.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">On these shoot days, I had Katie's shot list and made sure we had each shot that was listed, however, by editing it together Katie was able to see whether they needed other shots entirely that Alex and herself hadn't thought about while creating the shot lists, storyboards and blocking. I sat with Katie during the majority of the time she was creating the rough cut for just this set of footage. As I will be taking on the rest of the rough cut, I wanted to see what takes we had from the Owl Academy, as Boys advised previously, in order to know which take was better than the others - I need to know each take really well. If I revised the takes now before I take on the&nbsp;rough cut, then I am a step ahead than looking over the footage that has&nbsp;already been put into the edit timeline. In addition to this, I will be working around Katie's edit to save time for myself than re-doing what is already done. I was very happy with what Katie put together, therefore, it would have been silly to re-do it. As I will be&nbsp;working around&nbsp;this sequence, I will need to know each take from the Owl Academy well in order to develop what Katie has already edited together.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I also felt it was best to&nbsp;see how she edited, so I could use the same method. This is&nbsp;because after the rough cut I will be passing the edit back to Katie, therefore, I want her to be able to understand it from what she gave to me. Furthermore,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I wanted to be reminded about syncing the audio because apart from researching into the technique earlier in this blog post, I haven't actually put it into practice since the Transition Unit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">During the initial syncing of the audio, we came across a couple of problems and I made a few notes:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Katie didn't have the sound on the camera while filming so the footage and the scratch audio was silent.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Having the sound on the camera would have helped sync the audio as Katie, and myself when I come to edit it, would have been able to match up the audio peaks on the timeline from the scratch&nbsp;audio and main audio. As we&nbsp;didn't realise that the sound wasn't coming through the camera as well as the boom, she said that it was difficult to sync the audio with just the clapperboard, making this a longer process than it should be.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- In relation to the clapperboard, during this initial edit I realised how important it was to use the board at the beginning of each take. Matching the scratch and main audio would have been ideal but as we didn't have this, the clapperboard was the next option, which was easier than matching people's mouths to the dialogue would have been.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Using the clapperboard meant that we were able to write the scene and take number on it to be shown on each footage clip, however, I found that this was pointless if the number wasn't said out loud as well. Unfortunately,&nbsp;none of us realised this until the initial edit.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">There were a couple of times during the first shoot day where I had to use the clapperboard, I asked Alex if I had to call out the scene and take number and he said I didn't have to, so I didn't. While Katie was editing the first set of footage, we realised actually how important it was to read out the scene and take number. By doing this in the upcoming shoot week when it comes to creating the rough cut, I will be able to listen to the scene and take number, while looking for the same numbers on the footage. This will allow me to know which footage clip matches which audio clip. Not having the numbers spoken aloud, meant that Katie had to match the dialogue to the correct footage, and due to the lack of sound on the camera, it was difficult to do this.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I discovered a continuity error of the colour of Ed's vest changing over the two shoot days. I agreed the costume with the actors at the end of the first shoot day at the Owl Academy, however, I didn't realise the finer detail of parts of the clothing, such as his vest until I saw the change of colour in the edit. As the vest is barely noticeable, I believe that it won't be obvious and we'll be able to get away with it. I liaised with Alex about this and he agreed and said it wasn't worth a re-shoot.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Continuing with Boys' advice when editing comedy, he says that the comic timing is "100% instinctive" (Boys, n/d). When editing comedy, the timing&nbsp;should just&nbsp;come naturally,&nbsp;within the humour you&nbsp;should know when to cut the take. For example, if there is a reaction shot to something comedic, it is&nbsp;obvious that the&nbsp;reaction shot should be held to give the audience have time to laugh at the reaction, however, it will be instinctive to know how long for, this will be easier when focusing on the film and into the swing of the tone of the film. A possible way in which to do this well could be to hold it for as long as I think it&nbsp;should be and then ask someone else, either the director or someone with a fresh mind to see when they think it has&nbsp;been held&nbsp;enough for the&nbsp;comedy to come across.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">It is&nbsp;possible that not all the scenes or performances are going to work well once it comes to the edit, even if they sound&nbsp;funny in the script or during filming. Boys advises that if a scene&nbsp;isn't working well to have a look at it and if it's not obvious as to why it's not working then ask if it's needed. If it's an essential part of the story then it needs work done to it. If it wasn't quite right during the script, and filming and it's still not right in the edit, then maybe&nbsp;the scene is not meant to be in the film. I&nbsp;cannot be afraid to cut something if it's not working in the story. If it has to be there to help the story flow, moving the lines around slightly or reassembling it may work. Boys advises to start again on&nbsp;the scene that doesn't work, but to not re-use lines and takes that you've already tried, try to use new lines to see if that works or if it at least gives a spark of&nbsp;inspiration of how to fix it. This piece of&nbsp;advice may come in handy&nbsp;in the edit. As we are creating a comedy, it has to work to be funny for the audience, and&nbsp;because of this, there is a chance of it not working. I will keep this in mind when taking&nbsp;on the rough cut. The script has gone well and the&nbsp;filming we have&nbsp;already done has gone well, but this doesn't mean it will all work together in the edit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As <i>The Thick Of It </i>is our main inspiration, I watched a couple of&nbsp;episodes to focus on the editing. I have seen&nbsp;the show before due to VET-MAN being based on it, but I haven't&nbsp;looked at it in terms of the editing. I made a few notes that may help me when I start the post-production process:</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Emphasise the zooms and pans</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Uses&nbsp;shaky handheld footage to it's advantage</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Hold the shots for a&nbsp;certain amount of time before zooming, although this isn't massively obvious&nbsp;because of the shaky footage</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Not all quick and&nbsp;choppy shots, if something interesting is happening or sat&nbsp;on a reaction, they hold it for however long it needs</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I have taken these points&nbsp;away with me and I will aim to use them in the edit. As I am creating the&nbsp;rough cut, the visuals are my&nbsp;responsibility and I&nbsp;would like them&nbsp;complete by the time I pass the edit onto Katie. This means they need to look how Alex has visioned the film,&nbsp;which is in the same style as <i>The Thick Of It.</i></span><br /><div><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Relationship with the director</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Continuing with Anthony's interview, I wanted to learn about the relationship between an editor and director. As I am the producer of VET-MAN as well as co-editor, I felt it made most sense to separate the roles as throughout my research I found that producer/editors aren't common job roles, producers are simply likely to just take on a bit of the edit.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In the interview by Dublin Editors, Boys was asked if he gets&nbsp;involved in the production process with the director, he first explains that "getting involved during the production side entirely depends on the job" (Boys, n/d). Fortunately for me, as I am primarily the producer of the project, I have been able to be very involved in the production side as I have been organising it all and&nbsp;helping Alex during the shoot days with additional ideas. As a result&nbsp;of this, according to Boys I have had more access than an editor would usually get. He continues by saying especially when it comes to comedy and when the production is more reliant on the script, it's difficult for him to come in and say that he knows better than the production team. However, he has had&nbsp;input into the&nbsp;production side on many films that he's been involved with. Boys believes that this is "one of </span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">the areas where films differ from TV" (Boys, n/d), they like to get editors in and ask them on ways to save money, especially on films which are trying to bring the budget down. When this happens, he is able to give his advice and say</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;‘well if you shot it like this, then you don’t need that, you don’t need to build 2 walls of the set, so that will save you cash’. He continues by saying&nbsp;that the production team are really looking for you to help save the budget, which you then make sure they put into editing to give you more time.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As I am in charge of the budget, I am constantly&nbsp;thinking of ways to bring the outgoings down. Reading Boys' examples made me realise the benefit I have of being&nbsp;both producer and editor of the project. If I was primarily the editor then I would have had&nbsp;less creative input into the production of the project, it would mainly be down to the&nbsp;directors say.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In addition to this, being&nbsp;involved with the production throughout all stages means that I have been able to work with Alex throughout the whole project, building a good work relationship with him.&nbsp;This will be beneficial in the edit as I will be more likely to want to take his advice on and make the edit fulfil his vision. I aim to follow Alex's advice anyway, but it is possible that if we&nbsp;didn't have a good work relationship that I might have wanted to create the edit to my own vision rather&nbsp;than his.&nbsp;Fortunately,&nbsp;we have had a good relationship&nbsp;throughout the&nbsp;project, and I am&nbsp;ready to carry the relationship on into the edit stage.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Having a good&nbsp;work&nbsp;relationship with Alex&nbsp;leads onto Boys' next piece of advice, he explains that "you need to&nbsp;establish trust right away" (Boys, n/d).&nbsp;Reassurance&nbsp;is ideal in making sure the director trusts what you're&nbsp;going to do with the edit. Alex and I have&nbsp;already worked together in terms of director and editor in the Transitions Unit and that went well. Alex trusted that I would do my best to bring his vision to the screen, and I believe I did this successfully. I have also scheduled a variety of viewings with Alex in the post-production schedule, which shows that I want Alex to be a big part of the edit, rather than me editing it all and not letting him see it. I want Alex's input into the edit from the start so I can bring his vision across appropriately the&nbsp;first time, rather than editing the whole film for Alex to dislike it. Boys&nbsp;advises to make people&nbsp;laugh, the editor sits with the director for the next few months of the edit, so becoming friends with them is a good way to build trust. As I have known Alex for the past 3 years at&nbsp;University, I can say we have a good friendship. As I said previously, we have worked together before so we have already experienced a&nbsp;successful working relationship. Boys&nbsp;advises to be open&nbsp;with the director, the editor may have an idea but if they think it's not going to work, the&nbsp;director may be able&nbsp;to add to the idea to&nbsp;make it work. Even though it's the editor running the room, ensure that the&nbsp;director feels as if it's their room and their show. As the&nbsp;producer of the project, I should have&nbsp;some creative input into the edit, however, as it is Alex's vision I will allow him to make the last&nbsp;decision as long as it's something that we have both discussed.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Another question Boys was asked was about how to work with different editors on the same show, as they&nbsp;would all inevitably have different styles and edit methods. This piece of&nbsp;advice will be&nbsp;beneficial for me as I am sharing the editing role with Katie, and we need to make sure the piece flows smoothly between us. Boys explains that they had conversations about it at the&nbsp;beginning but once they started working&nbsp;together they were very "aware of what the house style is" (Boys, n/d), it comes to you&nbsp;quickly, sometimes it just takes on scene and then you understand the tone and style they're expecting. My initial thought was that as I am starting the edit, it will be Katie who would have to follow my&nbsp;style, however, as she edited together a section of the first two days filming and I said previously that I am going to continue on top off and develop her work, it will be me who needs to make sure I am following the style of her editing. When sitting with her to start the edit for the first two shoot days, I could understand where she was holding reaction shots and when she was combining the camera zooms into the edit to build the comedy. We are shooting the film with the intention to show camera&nbsp;movements as we are filming handheld instead of obtaining static shots. Katie did her&nbsp;research into the camera style and from that could possibly understand how the edit was going to look. As I&nbsp;didn't take part in this section of research, I&nbsp;didn't quite have that visual look towards the edit, until I watched the shoot days and re-watched the footage she had captured. As a result of this, I found it beneficial to watch Katie's style when editing together the first two shoot&nbsp;days, as I would be continuing the edit on the same timeline as this, it&nbsp;would&nbsp;need to flow smoothly together.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Katie only put&nbsp;together the footage from these days to see if we needed to re-shoot, however,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I&nbsp;didn't want to waste time in re-doing what Katie had already done and as it currently fits with our tone and the style we want VET-MAN to have, there was no need to re-do it.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Due to this, I aim to take on her style to the film and&nbsp;continue this. Subsequently, once I pass the film back to her for the fine cut she should&nbsp;follow the tone and style of the edit as a whole. By doing this, the edit should run smoothly even though it would have been passed back and&nbsp;fourth 3 times.&nbsp;</span></div><div><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></b><b style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Creativity</b><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b><br /></b></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Relating back to the article by&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Maria Johnsen in&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">blog post <i>Preparation for Shoot Day 1 &amp; 2</i>, in her opinion,</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;"to produce is to create" (Johnsen, 2018). Obviously, the producers responsibility includes controlling the budget, planning and organising, but Maria believes that the producer must also be "willing to give creative input to get the final result that is desired" (Johnsen, 2018). This creative input could be from many things such as casting, writing or re-writing scripts and editing. Individually, to produce means to make or generate, while to create means to put into existence, therefore, I have interpreted Maria's opinion as I needed to make the shoot happen to gain the footage, in order to put the film into existence. I believe I worked well within the organisational side of producing to make the shoot happen, and because of this I will be able to put the film into existence by creating the rough cut.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">In post-production, editing is my way of being a bigger part of the creative side to making a film. As a result of this, editing was highlighted to me the most when I read this part of the article. As I have said previously, I have been involved with casting by organising and attending the auditions and script read through, and I have been involved with the script, not by writing or re-writing, but by becoming the script editor and suggesting changes and improvements. However, editing the film will be the only part I will able to do on my own. Both casting and script editing meant that I was relying on Alex, however, I will be able to take charge of the edit as part of the creative side of producing.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><b>Reflection</b></span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- For the remaining shoot week, I will ensure that the camera is recording sound to make syncing the audio an easier task. By recording sound I will be able to follow my research and sync the audio with the same method that Machado advised, on top of double checking this by watching the clapperboard footage to make sure the audio is successfully synced.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- Sitting with Katie while she roughly put together the footage of the first two shoot days was beneficial because I was able to see the style in which she edited, which will help me when it comes to creating the rough cut.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- I am eager to put my creative side forward during the edit. Although I am responsible for other creative aspects of production, such as making sure the props and costumes were correct before shooting, I think after production I would have come to a stop on what to do next to benefit the film. I will aim to regularly update Alex on the edit and I hope to bring&nbsp;across new ideas. If we need to re-shoot I will think in the mind set of a editor in order to improve the initial shots for the edit.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">- As Alex and I have had a good work relationship I have all confidence that the rough cut will be successful and I will aim to take on his advice in order to get his vision across on the screen.</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;h